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1.
Am J Otolaryngol ; 43(4): 103473, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1889184

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Lateral nasal wall insufficiency has previously been a surgical challenge. In 2018, the Alar Nasal Valve Stent (Medtronic) was taken into use at Helsinki University Hospital. The alar cartilages are repositioned and locked into position with the Alar Nasal Valve Stent on the mucosa. The stent gives support and widens the alar valve while cartilages scar into their new position presumably facilitating breathing after removal of the stent. The aim of this prospective, observational study was to investigate whether the Alar Nasal Valve Stent has an effect on nasal breathing in patients with lateral nasal wall insufficiency. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Symptom questionnaires (Sino-Nasal Outcome Test-22, Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation, five-step symptom score) were analyzed preoperatively and at 3, 6, and 12 months postoperatively. Acoustic rhinometry, rhinomanometry, and peak nasal inspiratory flow were analyzed preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively. The patients performed a stress ergometry preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively, with their noses being photographed and filmed. RESULTS: In a series of 18 patients, a significant positive difference was seen in subjective symptom scores preoperatively versus postoperatively. The difference remained stable throughout the follow-up. No difference in objective symptom measurements was observed. CONCLUSIONS: Patients suffering from lateral nasal wall insufficiency experience a significant subjective improvement in nasal breathing after Alar Nasal Valve Stent surgery.


Subject(s)
Nasal Obstruction , Rhinoplasty , Humans , Nasal Cartilages/surgery , Nasal Obstruction/diagnosis , Nasal Obstruction/etiology , Nasal Obstruction/surgery , Nose/surgery , Prospective Studies , Stents
2.
Australas J Dermatol ; 63(3): e218-e221, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868570

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic led to a decrease in the number of operating rooms available. Single-stage islanded forehead flaps have emerged as a good alternative to the classic frontal flap helping to diminish the surgical waiting list. We present our case series of 6 patients reconstructed with islanded forehead flaps between February and July 2020.The purpose of this report is to assess the advantages and disadvantages of this technique in order to inform which subgroup of patients may benefit from the one-stage flap, now the pandemic is better controlled.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Rhinoplasty , Forehead , Humans , Nose/surgery , Pandemics , Rhinoplasty/methods
3.
World Neurosurg ; 152: 114-120, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Cerebrospinal fistulas of the clivus region often result from previous surgical intervention at the skull base. The localization and size of the fistula determine the appropriate treatment strategy. When flap closure is not possible, the microsuture technique with autograft placement provides a favorable outcome. METHODS: We present a technical report on the application of the microsuture technique for clivus region cerebrospinal fluid fistula closure in a patient with previous chordoma treatment and nonspecific coronavirus disease 2019 complications. RESULTS: The application of the microsuture technique resulted in stable remission of the fistula and complete regression of the clinical manifestations. CONCLUSIONS: The microsuture technique for clivus region fistula closure is a potentially valuable alternative to vascularized flap closure.


Subject(s)
Cerebellar Vermis/surgery , Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea/surgery , Cranial Fossa, Posterior/surgery , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Adult , Cerebrospinal Fluid Rhinorrhea/diagnosis , Cranial Fossa, Posterior/diagnostic imaging , Female , Humans , Nose/surgery , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures , Skull Base/surgery , Surgical Flaps/surgery
5.
J Otolaryngol Head Neck Surg ; 49(1): 81, 2020 Dec 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-992570

ABSTRACT

Healthcare services in many countries have been partially or completely disrupted by the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic since its onset in the end of 2019. Amongst the most impacted are the elective medical and surgical services in order to conserve resources to care for COVID-19 patients. As the number of infected patients decrease across Canada, elective surgeries are being restarted in a staged manner. Since Otolaryngologists - Head & Neck Surgeons manage surgical diseases of the upper aerodigestive tract where the highest viral load reside, it is imperative that these surgeries resume in a safe manner. The aim of this document is to compile the current best evidence available and provide expert consensus on the safe restart of rhinologic and skull base surgeries while discussing the pre-operative, intra-operative, and post-operative care and tips. Risk assessment, patient selection, case triage, and pre-operative COVID-19 testing will be analyzed and discussed. These guidelines will also consider the optimal use of personal protective equipment for specific cases, general and specific operative room precautions, and practical tips of intra-operative maneuvers to optimize patient and provider safety. Given that the literature surrounding COVID-19 is rapidly evolving, these recommendations will serve to start our specialty back into elective rhinologic surgeries over the next months and they may change as we learn more about this disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , COVID-19 , Nose/surgery , Otolaryngology/standards , Otorhinolaryngologic Surgical Procedures/standards , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Preoperative Care/standards , Skull Base/surgery , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Humans , Otolaryngology/methods , Otorhinolaryngologic Diseases/surgery , Postoperative Care/standards , Preoperative Care/methods
6.
Am J Rhinol Allergy ; 35(4): 441-448, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-818030

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The pandemic caused by the novel coronavirus virus has altered all facets of clinical practice in the United States. The goal of this study is to better understand the impact of COVID-19 on rhinologic ambulatory and operative practice. METHODS: A 27-item survey to assess these objectives was created and approved by the Division of Rhinology faculty at Rush University Medical Center in April 2020. The survey was then distributed to rhinologists in a web based format via www.surveymonkey.com from April 10 through April 23, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 277 U.S based rhinologists responded to the survey (23.04%). The most common practice types were single specialty private (44.9%) and academic (24.6%). 90.2% practice in a state under a shelter in place order. Comparing pre-COVID baseline to during-COVID, there was statistically significant reduction in the number of patients of seen daily in clinic (p < 0.001). The number of nasal endoscopies in the office and surgical procedures fell dramatically. Overall, 5 respondent rhinologists have been infected with COVID-19 and 27 have been furloughed. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 has drastically affected rhinologic practice. There is a dramatic reduction of in person care in the office setting and surgical management of sinonasal and skull base disease. Enhanced PPE is being used in only half of potentially aerosolizing procedures which represents an area of further education. Novel approaches such as use of virtual encounters and point of care testing should be considered as options to facilitate care.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/methods , COVID-19 , Nose/surgery , Operating Rooms/methods , Pandemics , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Aerosols , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Paranasal Sinuses/surgery , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
7.
J Laryngol Otol ; 134(8): 735-738, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-678491

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 is an international pandemic. One of the cardinal features is acute respiratory distress syndrome, and proning has been identified as beneficial for a subset of patients. However, proning is associated with pressure-related side effects, including injury to the nose and face. METHOD: This paper describes a pressure-relieving technique using surgical scrub sponges. This technique was derived based on previous methods used in patients following rhinectomy. CONCLUSION: The increased use of prone ventilation has resulted in a number of referrals to the ENT team with concerns regarding nasal pressure damage. The described technique, which is straightforward and uses readily available materials, has proven effective in relieving pressure in a small number of patients.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pressure/adverse effects , Prone Position/physiology , Respiration, Artificial/methods , Surgical Sponges/standards , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Equipment Design/methods , Facial Injuries/prevention & control , Humans , Nose/injuries , Nose/surgery , Patient Positioning/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Endocrinol Invest ; 44(3): 635-636, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-639909

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the Covid-19 pandemic every hospital has had to change its internal organization. Different institutions have highlighted the risks connected with endoscopic endonasal surgery. The goal of this paper is to illustrate the feasibility of pituitary region surgery during the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. METHODS: After two negative Covid tests were obtained, three patients with macro GH-secreting tumors, and two patients with micro ACTH-secreting tumors resistant to medical treatment underwent surgery during the pandemic. During the surgery, every patient was treated as if they were positive. RESULTS: Neither operator, nor patient have developed Covid symptoms. The two neurosurgeons performing the operations underwent two Covid swab, which resulted negative. CONCLUSIONS: Pituitary surgery is a high risk non-urgent surgery. However, the method described has so far been effective and is safe for both patients and healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
ACTH-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma/surgery , Adenoma/surgery , COVID-19 , Growth Hormone-Secreting Pituitary Adenoma/surgery , Infection Control , Neurosurgical Procedures/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Testing/standards , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Endoscopy/methods , Endoscopy/standards , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Italy/epidemiology , Neurosurgical Procedures/standards , Nose/surgery , Pandemics , Patient Safety/standards , Patient Selection , Protective Clothing , Protective Devices , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology
9.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 135: 110092, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-197689

ABSTRACT

While children, particularly infants, are susceptible to severe and critical COVID-19 disease, over 55% of pediatric cases are present in asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic children. Aerosolized SARS-CoV-2 viral particles remain viable for up to 3 hours, raising concern about risk to healthcare workers during aerosol generating procedures (APGs) in the airway and nasopharynx. Herein we describe the first case of a nasal foreign body in an asymptomatic child with SARS-CoV-2 infection. We discuss management of this child and highlight the importance of considering asymptomatic infection and preoperative testing when planning procedures of the airway in the COVID-19 era.


Subject(s)
Asymptomatic Infections , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections , Endoscopy/methods , Foreign Bodies/surgery , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Nose/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Betacoronavirus/genetics , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Child, Preschool , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Nose/surgery , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Preoperative Care , Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction , SARS-CoV-2
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