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2.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916172
3.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916171
4.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916170
5.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916169
6.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916168
7.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916167
8.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916166
9.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916165
10.
Intern Med J ; 52 Suppl 2: 5-55, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1916164
12.
Nucl Med Commun ; 43(5): 577-623, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1868446
13.
Hell J Nucl Med ; 25(1): 2-4, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1855187

ABSTRACT

It could be argued that the first medical historian in the Western Medical Tradition, is the author of the treatise On Ancient Medicine, included in the Hippocratic Corpus, in all probability, Hippocrates himself. In our time, the domain of the history of medicine is inhabited by two factions, often indifferent towards each other's contributions, if not occasionally confrontational. One faction is represented by medical practitioners who, usually upon retirement from clinical care, research and seek to understand the practice and evolution of their craft in the recent and distant past. They are the medical historians. The other, by academic historians with a background in humanities who view and research the history of medicine from a different perspective. Historiography, the philosophy of science, philological concerns, the provenance of manuscripts, textual scrutiny, the cultural and social parameters relevant to their historical subject, are the focus of the work of these historians of medicine. Rarely, researchers of the history of medicine combine optimally humanities with a medical background. Many will recognize Sir William Osler (1849-1919) as the best representative of this happy cohabitation. The opportunity now arises for a fruitful collaboration between medical historians and historians of medicine in recording the unprecedented times and the global challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Now is the time for truce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Historiography , Nuclear Medicine , History, 20th Century , Humans , Pandemics , Philosophy
14.
J Nucl Med ; 62(5): 593-595, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1817886

Subject(s)
Nuclear Medicine , Africa , Humans
15.
Jpn J Radiol ; 40(8): 847-856, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1763448

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To spotlight the trends and hot topics looming from the highly cited papers in the subject category of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging with bibliometric analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Based on the Essential Science Indicators, this study employed a bibliometric method to examine the highly cited papers in the subject category of Radiology, Nuclear Medicine & Medical Imaging in Web of Science (WoS) Categories, both quantitatively and qualitatively. In total, 1325 highly cited papers were retrieved and assessed spanning from the years of 2011 to 2021. In particular, the bibliometric information of the highly cited papers based on WoS database such as the main publication venues, the most productive countries, and the top cited publications was presented. An Abstract corpus was built to help identify the most frequently explored topics. VoSviewer was used to visualize the co-occurrence networks of author keywords. RESULTS: The top three active journals are Neuroimage, Radiology and IEEE T Med Imaging. The United States, Germany and England have the most influential publications. The top cited publications unrelated to COVID-19 can be grouped in three categories: recommendations or guidelines, processing software, and analysis methods. The top cited publications on COVID-19 are dominantly in China. The most frequently explored topics based on the Abstract corpus and the author keywords with the great link strengths overlap to a great extent. Specifically, phrases such as magnetic resonance imaging, deep learning, prostate cancer, chest CT, computed tomography, CT images, coronavirus disease, convolutional neural network(s) are among the most frequently mentioned. CONCLUSION: The bibliometric analysis of the highly cited papers provided the most updated trends and hot topics which may provide insights and research directions for medical researchers and healthcare practitioners in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nuclear Medicine , Bibliometrics , Diagnostic Imaging , Humans , Male , Publications
17.
J Nucl Med Technol ; 49(2): 164-169, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477743

ABSTRACT

In the latter half of 2019, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) began spreading worldwide. To prevent COVID-19 infection, all teaching at Suzuka University of Medical Sciences from April to June 2020 took place as remote lectures, not in the face-to-face format. This study analyzed postlecture questionnaire responses regarding face-to-face and remote teaching on the subject of nuclear medicine technology examinations. We examined the educational effect of using remote lectures. Methods: We conducted a questionnaire survey among students by means of a 5-point evaluation scale about satisfaction, comprehension, concentration, preparation, reviewing, and the question environment for face-to-face and remote lectures. Results: We present the results as means and SDs. Satisfaction results for face-to-face and remote lectures were 3.30 ± 0.72 and 3.36 ± 0.88, respectively. Comprehension results for face-to-face and remote lectures were 3.30 ± 0.71 and 3.30 ± 0.83, respectively. Concentration results for face-to-face and remote lectures were 3.50 ± 0.69 and 3.05 ± 0.90, respectively. The preparation results for face-to-face and remote lectures were 2.57 ± 0.88 and 2.67 ± 0.94, respectively. The reviewing results for face-to-face and remote lectures were 2.84 ± 0.85 and 3.39 ± 0.89, respectively. The question environment results for face-to-face and remote lectures lessons were 2.94 ± 0.90 and 3.43 ± 0.84, respectively. There were no significant differences between face-to-face and remote lectures in terms of satisfaction, comprehension, or preparation. There were significant differences between face-to-face and remote lectures in terms of concentration, reviewing, and the questioning environment (P < 0.001). Conclusion: This comparative analysis of the postlecture questionnaire responses for face-to-face and remote formats in nuclear medicine technology examinations showed that remote lectures have a strong educational effect. We believe that, in future, remote lectures should be considered a tool in student education.


Subject(s)
Education, Distance/methods , Nuclear Medicine/education , Curriculum , Education, Medical , Educational Measurement , Feedback , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Nucl Med Technol ; 50(1): 60-65, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444014

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread around the world. Its effects go far beyond health care: education has to be conducted so as to prevent infection among students and faculty. Accordingly, changes have occurred in Japan's educational institutions, including methods of preparing students for examinations for nuclear medicine. To assess the quality of training for radiologic technologists, we investigated the related changes undertaken at educational institutions. We investigated the lecture format for teaching nuclear medicine technology at Japanese institutions during COVID-19 and efforts to ensure the quality of conventional education. Methods: We sent a questionnaire to 19 Japanese institutions. It addressed the lecture format and initiatives in examinations for nuclear medicine technology in the first and second semesters of 2020. Results: We obtained responses from 17 institutions. In the first semester of 2020, the lecture format for nuclear medicine technology included remote, hybrid (combination of remote and face-to-face), and video-on-demand lectures. To reinforce the effect of the new teaching formats, institutions adopted various methods, such as enhancing the possibility of allowing students to ask questions, increasing the number of quizzes during lectures, delivering lectures to YouTube, and introducing an e-learning system. In the second semester of 2020, the lecture format included face-to-face, remote, hybrid, and video-on-demand lectures. In that second semester, the number of institutions providing face-to-face lectures while taking thorough measures against infection showed a marked increase. Conclusion: The institutions introduced various educational techniques and initiatives. They prioritized students' understanding of lecture content and applied what they considered the best teaching methods. Sharing information about the changes adopted at different institutions should help promote good radiologic technologists-even during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nuclear Medicine , Humans , Japan , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Technology
19.
Curr Med Imaging ; 18(7): 749-756, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), several journals have established a dedicated resource center for all the articles published on COVID-19. Our study compared the altmetric impact captured by articles published in journals having a COVID-19 resource center. METHODS: We used the Web of Science database to assess radiology journals publishing the most common articles on COVID-19. We used the dimensions database to assess citations received and altmetric attention score for each article. For each article, we extracted several citations received and altmetric attention scores. To account for the variation in strength and exposure between included journals, we adopted a normalization strategy and regression analysis in our statistical analysis. RESULTS: A total of 494 articles were included in the current assessment, including 334 (67.6%) articles published in journals with the dedicated COVID-19 resource center, including European radiology, American Journal of Roentgenology, Radiology, and Journal of the American college of radiology, while European Journal of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Academic Radiology did not have COVID-19 resource center. Journals with COVID-19 resource center had a mean normalized altmetric attention score of 0.38 higher (95% CI 0.25 to 0.50; p< 0.001) and a mean normalized citation count of 6.73 higher (95% CI 3.99 to 9.48; p< 0.001) than those without COVID-19 resource center. CONCLUSION: Radiology journals that provided COVID-19 articles in a dedicated resource center within its homepage had greater attention and higher citation for their COVID-19 articles than journals that did not have such a dedicated resource center.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nuclear Medicine , Periodicals as Topic , Databases, Factual , Humans , Journal Impact Factor
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