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2.
Nucleic Acids Res ; 50(15): 8700-8718, 2022 08 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1973223

ABSTRACT

FACT (FAcilitates Chromatin Transcription) is a heterodimeric protein complex composed of SUPT16H and SSRP1, and a histone chaperone participating in chromatin remodeling during gene transcription. FACT complex is profoundly regulated, and contributes to both gene activation and suppression. Here we reported that SUPT16H, a subunit of FACT, is acetylated in both epithelial and natural killer (NK) cells. The histone acetyltransferase TIP60 contributes to the acetylation of SUPT16H middle domain (MD) at lysine 674 (K674). Such acetylation of SUPT16H is recognized by bromodomain protein BRD4, which promotes protein stability of SUPT16H in both epithelial and NK cells. We further demonstrated that SUPT16H-BRD4 associates with histone modification enzymes (HDAC1, EZH2), and further regulates their activation status and/or promoter association as well as affects the relevant histone marks (H3ac, H3K9me3 and H3K27me3). BRD4 is known to profoundly regulate interferon (IFN) signaling, while such function of SUPT16H has never been explored. Surprisingly, our results revealed that SUPT16H genetic knockdown via RNAi or pharmacological inhibition by using its inhibitor, curaxin 137 (CBL0137), results in the induction of IFNs and interferon-stimulated genes (ISGs). Through this mechanism, depletion or inhibition of SUPT16H is shown to efficiently inhibit infection of multiple viruses, including Zika, influenza, and SARS-CoV-2. Furthermore, we demonstrated that depletion or inhibition of SUPT16H also causes the remarkable activation of IFN signaling in NK cells, which promotes the NK-mediated killing of virus-infected cells in a co-culture system using human primary NK cells. Overall, our studies unraveled the previously un-appreciated role of FACT complex in coordinating with BRD4 and regulating IFN signaling in both epithelial and NK cells, and also proposed the novel application of the FACT inhibitor CBL0137 to treat viral infections.


Subject(s)
Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Interferons/metabolism , Killer Cells, Natural/metabolism , Signal Transduction , Transcription Factors/metabolism , COVID-19 , DNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Epithelial Cells/immunology , High Mobility Group Proteins/genetics , Humans , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Transcriptional Elongation Factors/genetics , Zika Virus/metabolism , Zika Virus Infection
3.
Cancer Rep (Hoboken) ; 5(5): e1512, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1913776

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mulibrey-Nanism (Muscle-liver-brain-eye Nanism = dwarfism; MUL) is a rare genetic syndrome. The underlying TRIM37 mutation predisposes these children to develop tumors frequently. In the largest published series of MUL, 8% patients were reported to develop Wilms tumor (WT). The published literature lacks data regarding the best treatment protocol and outcome of this cohort of children with WT and MUL. We report here a 2-year-old boy with WT and MUL and present a review of literature on WT in MUL. CASE: Our patient had associated cardiac problems of atrial septal defect, atrial flutter and an episode of sudden cardiac arrest. We managed him successfully with chemotherapy, surgery and multi-speciality care. He is alive and in remission at follow-up of 6 months. CONCLUSION: A total of 14 cases (including present case) of WT have been reported in MUL and treatment details were available for six cases. They were managed primarily with surgery, chemotherapy with/without radiotherapy, and all achieved remission. The outcome data is available only for two cases, one has been followed up till 15 years post treatment for WT and other is our patient.


Subject(s)
Kidney Neoplasms , Mulibrey Nanism , Wilms Tumor , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Kidney Neoplasms/diagnosis , Kidney Neoplasms/therapy , Male , Mulibrey Nanism/complications , Mulibrey Nanism/genetics , Mulibrey Nanism/pathology , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Tripartite Motif Proteins , Ubiquitin-Protein Ligases , Wilms Tumor/complications , Wilms Tumor/diagnosis , Wilms Tumor/therapy
4.
Biomed Pharmacother ; 152: 113230, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881709

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Bromodomain and extraterminal proteins (BETs) are more than just epigenetic regulators of transcription. Here we highlight a new role for the BET protein BRD4 in the maintenance of higher order chromatin structure at Topologically Associating Domain Boundaries (TADBs). BD2-selective and pan (non-selective) BET inhibitors (BETi) differentially support chromatin structure, selectively affecting transcription and cell viability. METHODS: Using RNA-seq and BRD4 ChIP-seq, the differential effect of BETi treatment on the transcriptome and BRD4 chromatin occupancy of human aortic endothelial cells from diabetic patients (dHAECs) stimulated with TNFα was evaluated. Chromatin decondensation and DNA fragmentation was assessed by immunofluorescence imaging and quantification. Key dHAEC findings were verified in proliferating monocyte-like THP-1 cells using real time-PCR, BRD4 co-immunoprecipitation studies, western blots, proliferation and apoptosis assays. FINDINGS: We discovered that 1) BRD4 co-localizes with Ying-Yang 1 (YY1) at TADBs, critical chromatin structure complexes proximal to many DNA repair genes. 2) BD2-selective BETi enrich BRD4/YY1 associations, while pan-BETi do not. 3) Failure to support chromatin structures through BRD4/YY1 enrichment inhibits DNA repair gene transcription, which induces DNA damage responses, and causes widespread chromatin decondensation, DNA fragmentation, and apoptosis. 4) BD2-selective BETi maintain high order chromatin structure and cell viability, while reducing deleterious pro-inflammatory transcription. INTERPRETATION: BRD4 plays a previously unrecognized role at TADBs. BETi differentially impact TADB stability. Our results provide translational insight for the development of BETi as therapeutics for a range of diseases including CVD, chronic kidney disease, cancer, and COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Transcription Factors , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Chromatin , Endothelial Cells/metabolism , Epigenesis, Genetic , Humans , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Transcription Factors/metabolism
5.
Epigenomics ; 14(3): 153-162, 2022 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622527

ABSTRACT

Smoking could predispose individuals to a more severe COVID-19 by upregulating a particular gene known as mdig, which is mediated through a number of well-known histone modifications. Smoking might regulate the transcription-activating H3K4me3 mark, along with the transcription-repressing H3K9me3 and H3K27me3 marks, in a way to favor SARS-CoV-2 entry by enhancing the expression of ACE2, NRP1 and NRP2, AT1R, CTSD and CTSL, PGE2 receptors 2-4, SLC6A20 and IL-6, all of which interact either directly or indirectly with important receptors, facilitating viral entry in COVID-19.


Lay abstract The role of smoking in development of several respiratory diseases has been clearly established. A significant proportion of these deleterious effects is mediated through epigenetic mechanisms, particularly histone modifications. Recent evidence indicates that smoking induces the expression of a mediator known as mdig, which in turn alters the transcription of several key proteins that have been implicated in development of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Dioxygenases/genetics , Epigenesis, Genetic , Histone Demethylases/genetics , Histones/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Protein Processing, Post-Translational , Smoking/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/genetics , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Cathepsin D/genetics , Cathepsin D/metabolism , Cathepsin L/genetics , Cathepsin L/metabolism , Dioxygenases/metabolism , Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Interleukin-6/genetics , Interleukin-6/metabolism , Membrane Transport Proteins/genetics , Membrane Transport Proteins/metabolism , Methylation , Neuropilin-1/genetics , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Neuropilin-2/genetics , Neuropilin-2/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Protein Isoforms/genetics , Protein Isoforms/metabolism , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/genetics , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 1/metabolism , Receptors, Prostaglandin E/genetics , Receptors, Prostaglandin E/metabolism , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/growth & development , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Smoking/metabolism , Smoking/pathology , Virus Internalization
6.
Nat Commun ; 12(1): 4918, 2021 08 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1397870

ABSTRACT

Ribosomal RNA genes (rDNA) are highly unstable and susceptible to rearrangement due to their repetitive nature and active transcriptional status. Sequestration of rDNA in the nucleolus suppresses uncontrolled recombination. However, broken repeats must be first released to the nucleoplasm to allow repair by homologous recombination. Nucleolar release of broken rDNA repeats is conserved from yeast to humans, but the underlying molecular mechanisms are currently unknown. Here we show that DNA damage induces phosphorylation of the CLIP-cohibin complex, releasing membrane-tethered rDNA from the nucleolus in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Downstream of phosphorylation, SUMOylation of CLIP-cohibin is recognized by Ufd1 via its SUMO-interacting motif, which targets the complex for disassembly through the Cdc48/p97 chaperone. Consistent with a conserved mechanism, UFD1L depletion in human cells impairs rDNA release. The dynamic and regulated assembly and disassembly of the rDNA-tethering complex is therefore a key determinant of nucleolar rDNA release and genome integrity.


Subject(s)
Cell Nucleolus/genetics , DNA Repair , DNA, Ribosomal/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/genetics , Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/genetics , Valosin Containing Protein/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cell Nucleolus/metabolism , DNA Damage , DNA, Ribosomal/metabolism , Humans , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Mutation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Phosphorylation , Protein Binding , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/genetics , Saccharomyces cerevisiae/metabolism , Saccharomyces cerevisiae Proteins/metabolism , Small Ubiquitin-Related Modifier Proteins/metabolism , Sumoylation , Two-Hybrid System Techniques , Valosin Containing Protein/metabolism
7.
Int J Mol Sci ; 22(3)2021 Jan 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1389387

ABSTRACT

In this review, we discuss the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA), which is the master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. CIITA is the founding member of the mammalian nucleotide-binding and leucine-rich-repeat (NLR) protein family but stood apart for a long time as the only transcriptional regulator. More recently, it was found that its closest homolog, NLRC5 (NLR protein caspase activation and recruitment domain (CARD)-containing 5), is a regulator of MHC-I gene expression. Both act as non-DNA-binding activators through multiple protein-protein interactions with an MHC enhanceosome complex that binds cooperatively to a highly conserved combinatorial cis-acting module. Thus, the regulation of MHC-II expression is regulated largely through the differential expression of CIITA. In addition to the well-defined role of CIITA in MHC-II GENE regulation, we will discuss several other aspects of CIITA functions, such as its role in cancer, its role as a viral restriction element contributing to intrinsic immunity, and lastly, its very recently discovered role as an inhibitor of Ebola and SARS-Cov-2 virus replication. We will briefly touch upon the recently discovered role of NLRP3 as a transcriptional regulator, which suggests that transcriptional regulation is, after all, not such an unusual feature for NLR proteins.


Subject(s)
Genes, MHC Class II , NLR Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Trans-Activators/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/genetics , COVID-19/metabolism , Ebolavirus/physiology , Gene Expression Regulation , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/genetics , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/metabolism , Humans , NLR Proteins/genetics , Neoplasms/genetics , Neoplasms/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Protein Interaction Maps , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Trans-Activators/genetics , Virus Replication
8.
Theranostics ; 11(16): 7970-7983, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337804

ABSTRACT

The novel ß-coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, the causative agent of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), has infected more than 177 million people and resulted in 3.84 million death worldwide. Recent epidemiological studies suggested that some environmental factors, such as air pollution, might be the important contributors to the mortality of COVID-19. However, how environmental exposure enhances the severity of COVID-19 remains to be fully understood. In the present report, we provided evidence showing that mdig, a previously reported environmentally-induced oncogene that antagonizes repressive trimethylation of histone proteins, is an important regulator for SARS-CoV-2 receptors neuropilin-1 (NRP1) and NRP2, cathepsins, glycan metabolism and inflammation, key determinants for viral infection and cytokine storm of the patients. Depletion of mdig in bronchial epithelial cells by CRISPR-Cas-9 gene editing resulted in a decreased expression of NRP1, NRP2, cathepsins, and genes involved in protein glycosylation and inflammation, largely due to a substantial enrichment of lysine 9 and/or lysine 27 trimethylation of histone H3 (H3K9me3/H3K27me3) on these genes as determined by ChIP-seq. Meanwhile, we also validated that environmental factor arsenic is able to induce mdig, NRP1 and NRP2, and genetic disruption of mdig lowered expression of NRP1 and NRP2. Furthermore, mdig may coordinate with the Neanderthal variants linked to an elevated mortality of COVID-19. These data, thus, suggest that mdig is a key mediator for the severity of COVID-19 in response to environmental exposure and targeting mdig may be the one of the effective strategies in ameliorating the symptom and reducing the mortality of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/metabolism , COVID-19/virology , Dioxygenases/metabolism , Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Neuropilin-1/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Polysaccharides/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2/metabolism , Alveolar Epithelial Cells/metabolism , Animals , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cathepsins/metabolism , Cell Line , Cells, Cultured , Dioxygenases/biosynthesis , Dioxygenases/genetics , Environmental Exposure , Histone Demethylases/biosynthesis , Histone Demethylases/genetics , Histones/metabolism , Humans , Nuclear Proteins/biosynthesis , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Rats , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spike Glycoprotein, Coronavirus/metabolism
9.
Eur J Med Res ; 26(1): 75, 2021 Jul 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309928

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of four up/down-regulated inflammatory miRNAs and their mRNA targets in the serum samples of COVID-19 patients with different grades. Also, we investigated the relative expression of these miRNAs and mRNAs during hospitalization. METHODS: In this cross-sectional study, 5 mL of blood sample were taken from COVID-19 patients with different grades and during hospitalization from several health centers of Yazd, Tehran, and Zahedan province of Iran from December 20, 2020 to March 2, 2021. The relative expression of miRNAs and mRNAs was evaluated by q-PCR. RESULTS: We found that the relative expression of hsa-miR-31-3p, hsa-miR-29a-3p, and hsa-miR-126-3p was significantly decreased and the relative expression of their mRNA targets (ZMYM5, COL5A3, and CAMSAP1) was significantly increased with the increase of disease grade. Conversely, the relative expression of hsa-miR-17-3p was significantly increased and its mRNA target (DICER1) was significantly decreased with the increase of disease grade. This pattern was exactly seen during hospitalization of COVID-19 patients who did not respond to treatment. In COVID-19 patients who responded to treatment, the expression of selected miRNAs and their mRNA targets returned to the normal level. A negative significant correlation was seen between (1) the expression of hsa-miR-31-3p and ZMYM5, (2) hsa-miR-29a-3p and COL5A3, (3) hsa-miR-126-3p and CAMSAP1, and (4) hsa-miR-17-3p and DICER1 in COVID-19 patients with any grade (P < 0.05) and during hospitalization. CONCLUSIONS: In this study, we gained a more accurate understanding of the expression of up/down-regulated inflammatory miRNAs in the blood of COVID-19 patients. The obtained data may help us in the diagnosis and prognosis of COVID-19. TRIAL REGISTRATION: The ethics committee of Zahedan University of Medical Sciences, Zahedan, Iran. (Ethical Code: IR.ZAUMS.REC.1399.316) was registered for this project.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling , MicroRNAs/genetics , RNA, Messenger/genetics , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/virology , Carrier Proteins/genetics , Collagen/genetics , Cross-Sectional Studies , DEAD-box RNA Helicases/genetics , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Iran , Microtubule-Associated Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Ribonuclease III/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Severity of Illness Index
10.
Sci Rep ; 11(1): 9905, 2021 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1223111

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected African American populations disproportionately with respect to prevalence, and mortality. Expression profiles represent snapshots of combined genetic, socio-environmental (including socioeconomic and environmental factors), and physiological effects on the molecular phenotype. As such, they have potential to improve biological understanding of differences among populations, and provide therapeutic biomarkers and environmental mitigation strategies. Here, we undertook a large-scale assessment of patterns of gene expression between African Americans and European Americans, mining RNA-Seq data from 25 non-diseased and diseased (tumor) tissue-types. We observed the widespread enrichment of pathways implicated in COVID-19 and integral to inflammation and reactive oxygen stress. Chemokine CCL3L3 expression is up-regulated in African Americans. GSTM1, encoding a glutathione S-transferase that metabolizes reactive oxygen species and xenobiotics, is upregulated. The little-studied F8A2 gene is up to 40-fold more highly expressed in African Americans; F8A2 encodes HAP40 protein, which mediates endosome movement, potentially altering the cellular response to SARS-CoV-2. African American expression signatures, superimposed on single cell-RNA reference data, reveal increased number or activity of esophageal glandular cells and lung ACE2-positive basal keratinocytes. Our findings establish basal prognostic signatures that can be used to refine approaches to minimize risk of severe infection and improve precision treatment of COVID-19 for African Americans. To enable dissection of causes of divergent molecular phenotypes, we advocate routine inclusion of metadata on genomic and socio-environmental factors for human RNA-sequencing studies.


Subject(s)
African Americans/genetics , COVID-19/genetics , Gene Expression Profiling/methods , Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic , Neoplasms/genetics , /genetics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Chemokine CCL3/genetics , Gene Regulatory Networks , Glutathione Transferase/genetics , Humans , Neoplasms/classification , Neoplasms/ethnology , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Prognosis , RNA-Seq/methods , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Socioeconomic Factors , United States/epidemiology
11.
Head Neck Pathol ; 15(4): 1409-1414, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122819

ABSTRACT

NUT carcinoma (NUT-C) is a relatively new malignancy that was recently listed in the 4th edition of the WHO Classification of Head and Neck Tumors in 2017. NUT carcinoma is a rare, aggressive, poorly differentiated carcinoma genetically defined by chromosomal rearrangement of the nuclear protein in testis (NUTM1) gene. The prognosis is extremely poor, with a mean survival < 1 year. Recent publications suggest a multimodality treatment approach. In the existing literature, only a few reports of sinonasal NUT-C have been reported. Sinonasal NUT-C is considered a very rare entity, but because of its recent inclusion as a head and neck malignancy, its true prevalence is unknown. We report the case of a 56-year-old woman with NUT-C of the sinonasal cavities. In the case reported, the coexistence of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19)-related nasal congestion delayed the diagnosis of NUT-C. Clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment modalities are discussed together with a review of the literature.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Delayed Diagnosis , Neoplasm Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Mutation , Pandemics , Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms/diagnosis , Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms/genetics , Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms/pathology , Paranasal Sinus Neoplasms/therapy , Prognosis , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/diagnosis , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/genetics , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/pathology , Squamous Cell Carcinoma of Head and Neck/therapy
13.
Viruses ; 12(11)2020 11 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-940255

ABSTRACT

The zinc finger proteins make up a significant part of the proteome and perform a huge variety of functions in the cell. The CCCH-type zinc finger proteins have gained attention due to their unusual ability to interact with RNA and thereby control different steps of RNA metabolism. Since virus infections interfere with RNA metabolism, dynamic changes in the CCCH-type zinc finger proteins and virus replication are expected to happen. In the present review, we will discuss how three CCCH-type zinc finger proteins, ZC3H11A, MKRN1, and U2AF1, interfere with human adenovirus replication. We will summarize the functions of these three cellular proteins and focus on their potential pro- or anti-viral activities during a lytic human adenovirus infection.


Subject(s)
Adenoviridae/physiology , Adenovirus Infections, Human/virology , Host Microbial Interactions , RNA-Binding Proteins/genetics , Zinc Fingers/genetics , Humans , Nerve Tissue Proteins/genetics , Nerve Tissue Proteins/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , RNA-Binding Proteins/metabolism , Ribonucleoproteins/genetics , Ribonucleoproteins/metabolism , Splicing Factor U2AF/genetics , Splicing Factor U2AF/metabolism , Virus Replication
14.
Science ; 370(6513): 241-247, 2020 10 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-733186

ABSTRACT

Recent outbreaks of Ebola virus (EBOV) and severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) have exposed our limited therapeutic options for such diseases and our poor understanding of the cellular mechanisms that block viral infections. Using a transposon-mediated gene-activation screen in human cells, we identify that the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II transactivator (CIITA) has antiviral activity against EBOV. CIITA induces resistance by activating expression of the p41 isoform of invariant chain CD74, which inhibits viral entry by blocking cathepsin-mediated processing of the Ebola glycoprotein. We further show that CD74 p41 can block the endosomal entry pathway of coronaviruses, including SARS-CoV-2. These data therefore implicate CIITA and CD74 in host defense against a range of viruses, and they identify an additional function of these proteins beyond their canonical roles in antigen presentation.


Subject(s)
Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte/physiology , Betacoronavirus/physiology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Ebolavirus/physiology , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/immunology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/physiology , Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology , Nuclear Proteins/physiology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Trans-Activators/physiology , Virus Internalization , Antigens, Differentiation, B-Lymphocyte/genetics , COVID-19 , Cell Line, Tumor , Coronavirus Infections/virology , DNA Transposable Elements , Endosomes/virology , Genetic Testing , Hemorrhagic Fever, Ebola/virology , Histocompatibility Antigens Class II/genetics , Host-Pathogen Interactions/genetics , Humans , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Trans-Activators/genetics , Transcription, Genetic
15.
PLoS One ; 15(7): e0235987, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690896

ABSTRACT

Development of novel approaches for regulating the expression of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) and transmembrane serine protease 2 (TMPRSS2) is becoming increasingly important within the context of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic since these enzymes play a crucial role in cell infection. In this work we searched for putative ACE2 and TMPRSS2 expression regulation networks mediated by various miRNA isoforms (isomiR) across different human organs using publicly available paired miRNA/mRNA-sequencing data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project. As a result, we identified several miRNA families targeting ACE2 and TMPRSS2 genes in multiple tissues. In particular, we found that lysine-specific demethylase 5B (JARID1B), encoded by the KDM5B gene, can indirectly affect ACE2 / TMPRSS2 expression by repressing transcription of hsa-let-7e / hsa-mir-125a and hsa-mir-141 / hsa-miR-200 miRNA families which are targeting these genes.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Gene Expression Regulation , MicroRNAs/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , RNA, Messenger/genetics , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , 3' Untranslated Regions , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Databases, Genetic , Gene Regulatory Networks , Humans , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics , MicroRNAs/metabolism , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , RNA Isoforms/genetics , RNA, Messenger/metabolism , RNA-Seq , Repressor Proteins/genetics , SARS-CoV-2 , Serine Endopeptidases/metabolism , Single-Cell Analysis
16.
Mol Cell Endocrinol ; 515: 110917, 2020 09 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-661768

ABSTRACT

Obesity patients are more susceptible to develop COVID-19 severe outcome due to the role of angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) in the viral infection. ACE2 is regulated in the human cells by different genes associated with increased (TLR3, HAT1, HDAC2, KDM5B, SIRT1, RAB1A, FURIN and ADAM10) or decreased (TRIB3) virus replication. RNA-seq data revealed 14857 genes expressed in human subcutaneous adipocytes, including genes mentioned above. Irisin treatment increased by 3-fold the levels of TRIB3 transcript and decreased the levels of other genes. The decrease in FURIN and ADAM10 expression enriched diverse biological processes, including extracellular structure organization. Our results, in human subcutaneous adipocytes cell culture, indicate a positive effect of irisin on the expression of multiple genes related to viral infection by SARS-CoV-2; furthermore, translatable for other tissues and organs targeted by the novel coronavirus and present, thus, promising approaches for the treatment of COVID-19 infection as therapeutic strategy to decrease ACE2 regulatory genes.


Subject(s)
Adipocytes/drug effects , Fibronectins/pharmacology , Gene Expression Regulation/drug effects , ADAM10 Protein/genetics , ADAM10 Protein/metabolism , Adipocytes/cytology , Adipocytes/metabolism , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/genetics , Amyloid Precursor Protein Secretases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2 , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/metabolism , COVID-19 , Cell Cycle Proteins/genetics , Cell Cycle Proteins/metabolism , Cells, Cultured , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Fibronectins/genetics , Fibronectins/metabolism , Furin/genetics , Furin/metabolism , Gene Ontology , Histone Acetyltransferases/genetics , Histone Acetyltransferases/metabolism , Histone Deacetylase 2/genetics , Histone Deacetylase 2/metabolism , Humans , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/genetics , Jumonji Domain-Containing Histone Demethylases/metabolism , Membrane Proteins/genetics , Membrane Proteins/metabolism , Models, Biological , Molecular Sequence Annotation , Nuclear Proteins/genetics , Nuclear Proteins/metabolism , Obesity/virology , Pandemics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/genetics , Peptidyl-Dipeptidase A/metabolism , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , /genetics , Repressor Proteins/genetics , Repressor Proteins/metabolism , SARS-CoV-2 , Signal Transduction , Sirtuin 1/genetics , Sirtuin 1/metabolism , Toll-Like Receptor 3/genetics , Toll-Like Receptor 3/metabolism , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/genetics , rab1 GTP-Binding Proteins/metabolism
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