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1.
Nurs Manage ; 53(4): 38-40, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1788534

ABSTRACT

The following manuscript is one of the runner-up entries submitted to Nursing Management for the Visionary Leader Award in recognition of Carol Grove, MSN, RN, NEA-BC, the associate CNO at Meritus Medical Center in Hagerstown, Md.


Subject(s)
Awards and Prizes , Nurse Administrators , Nursing Care , Humans , Leadership , Research Personnel
2.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(2): E8-E15, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722719

ABSTRACT

We conducted semistructured telephone interviews with 2 hospital-based nurse leaders who supervised nurses during the initial phases of the COVID-19 pandemic in northeastern region of the United States. These interviews are a subset of a larger study with 11 nurse executives who supervised nurses during both natural and human-made disasters in different regions of the United States. Qualitative data were analyzed using a grounded theory approach, followed by a content analysis of emerging themes. Participants shared several key concepts: deep commitment of nurses in an extensive range of roles and responsibilities during tragic events; an emphasis on educational needs to best prepare nurses for disaster response; the importance of organizational strategies and definitive policies for supporting nurses' response and recovery; and mental/emotional health support as essential for nurses to cope with the events. The nurse executive participants reported many opportunities to enhance nurses' knowledge and skill set to augment care in the hospital. A team-based approach that leverages the expertise of team members to strengthen the health care team is implemented and demonstrates positive patient outcomes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
3.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(2): 177-184, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722718

ABSTRACT

New York City (NYC) was in the eye of the COVID-19 pandemic storm in the spring of 2020. Since that time, the country has seen wave after wave of outbreaks and concurrent psychosocial crises. Clinical nurses and nurse leaders delivered extraordinary care with grit, innovation, agility, and resilience. When in the eye of the storm, staff have to feel safe and have a voice even in command-control, adaptive modes. Nurses and nurse leaders have been resilient, and organizations have to play their part in decreasing work burden and creating positive work environments. Non-value-added work as well as barriers to practice should be eliminated permanently. This article describes the many challenges including intensive care unit capacity, staffing, well-being, and lack of visitation, as well as leadership lessons such as the importance of presence, based on the NYC experience of a chief nursing officer in a large academic medical center. These lessons and their implications for our workforce, for public health, and for leadership development and competencies and have taught us how to lead into the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Nurse Administrators , Pandemics , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , New York City , Nurse Administrators/psychology
4.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(2): 125-136, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722717

ABSTRACT

Responding to and navigating the COVID-19 pandemic were demanding and all-consuming for executive nurse leaders. Long-term pandemic challenges will continue and therefore it is important for nurse leaders to develop their reflective practice to increase role competency, gain wisdom, and advance the profession. The complex postpandemic world requires nurse leaders to show up differently, stop ineffective practices, continue best practices, and implement new ideas to improve performance and outcomes. This article offers a framework for leadership reflection, through role negotiation technique, to identify lessons from the lived nurse executive experience of the COVID-19 pandemic. Specific focus is placed on communication, teamwork, professional governance, posttraumatic growth, gratitude, diversity/equity/inclusion, and social determinants of health. These concepts, along with specific tactics, will help leaders set priorities, aid nursing leadership practice, identify meaningful goals and desired outcomes, and effectively lead to advance the nursing profession postpandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
5.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(2): 101-102, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722721
6.
Nurs Open ; 9(2): 1294-1302, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707956

ABSTRACT

AIM: With the rise in frequency and severity of disasters in recent decades, it is essentially important that nurses must be adequately prepared to handle them. This study was aimed to evaluate the levels of disaster core competencies and preparedness of nurses in the emergency department. DESIGN: A cross-sectional survey design was used. METHODS: This cross-sectional research was conducted from August 2020 to December 2020 among 271 nurses in the emergency departments of six hospitals in Qazvin, Iran. The participants completed the "Nurses Perceptions of Disaster Core Competencies Scale" (NPDCC) (45 items) and the disaster preparedness (a single-item visual scale). Data were analysed by one-way analysis of variance, independent t-tests and multiple linear regression analysis. RESULTS: The mean scores of disaster preparedness and core competencies of nurses were 6.75 out of 10 (SD = 1.63) and 2.88 out of 5 (SD = 0.80), respectively. "Technical skills" (mean = 3.24, SD = 0.91) were the highest and "communication skills" (mean = 2.57, SD = 0.95) were the lowest across the subscales of the scale. A significant association was found between disaster core competencies and preparedness of nurses (p < .001). Regression analysis results indicated that nursing disaster core competencies were perceived betted by older nurses (B = -0.405) who had experience in the disaster stage (B = 0.228) and nurses with disaster response experience (B = 0.223) and lower professional experience (B = 0.309). Nurses with a postdiploma degree (B = -0.480) and bachelor's degree (B = -0.416) were perceived to have lower disaster core competency than nurses with a master's or PhD degree. CONCLUSION: There are still gaps in disaster preparedness and core competencies for emergency nurses that need to be addressed. Nursing managers must support an improvement in nursing disaster core competencies. This may be done by conducting sessions for routine disaster scenarios and providing formal disaster preparedness training.


Subject(s)
Disasters , Nurse Administrators , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Iran
7.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(3): 177-184, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1701385

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: A virtual mental well-being initiative was developed for nurse leaders to provide education about mental health and to teach self-care skills. BACKGROUND: Because of substantial demand placed on nurse leaders during the COVID-19 pandemic, organizations must address stress and burnout by providing a continuum of care to include education, support, and intervention. METHODS: All levels of nurse leaders at a multicampus healthcare system were invited to attend. Data were collected on coping, empowerment, burnout, and quality of life. Participant responses to discussion prompts were compiled and reviewed. RESULTS: Although the independent parallel comparison did not show significant improvements, scores on the coping, empowerment, burnout, and quality-of-life measures were maintained. Discussion prompts yielded valuable insights into nurse leader experiences and session effectiveness. CONCLUSIONS: This type of education, as well as psychological support, will continue to be needed after the pandemic due to burnout, moral injury, and primary or secondary trauma. Findings are applicable to future crisis situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance , Mental Health/education , Nurse Administrators/education , Decision Making , Humans , Morals , Resilience, Psychological , Self Care
8.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(3): 154-159, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1691742

ABSTRACT

This article explores crisis leadership, with the purpose of offering a series of leadership behaviors and strategies for nurse administrators to limit and reduce the harm of crises, specifically the COVID-19 pandemic, to healthcare professionals. Based on the assumption that generic or universal crisis management approaches are generally ineffective and efficacious crisis management must be tailored to a specific crisis, a study was conducted to identify the most serious COVID-based stressors. The results revealed 5 categories of COVID stressors which are, in ascending order: miscellaneous, administration, patients/patient family issues, inherent aspect of the job (nursing), and personal issues. Personal issues comprised more than half of the greatest COVID-specific stressors. Building on relevant crisis management literature and the identification of COVID-specific stressors, this article provides suggestions and proven tactics for nurse administrators to guide their crisis leadership efforts for the COVID-19 pandemic. The lessons of this article are applicable to other crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Leadership , Nurse Administrators , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , Communication , Empathy , Female , Humans , Male , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Nurs Health Sci ; 24(1): 304-311, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1666333

ABSTRACT

This study aimed to explore the experiences of nurses in Wuhan Hospital as front-line workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. A descriptive qualitative study of such nurses was conducted from a tertiary hospital in Wuhan. Semi-structured individual interviews were undertaken with 8 registered nurses who were front-line health workers in one of the COVID-19 wards and 3 nursing managers from the response team. Five discrete themes were identified from the narratives of nurses' experiences during the COVID-19 outbreak in Wuhan: "content of fundamental care," "teamwork," "reciprocity," "nurses' own worries," and "lifelong learning and insights." Nurses in the front line of care during the COVID-19 pandemic can contribute important information from their hands-on experience for providing a holistic response to an infectious outbreak like COVID-19. The concerns nurses raised at both personal and professional levels have implications for nursing education and clinical practice settings, particularly in the time of a pandemic when nurses' well-being requires attention, and at the same time for considering organizational factors that enable nurses to provide care to patients with confidence. Hospital policies and nursing management need to be ready and adhere to flexible work planning systems and approaches during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Nurses , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Nurs Open ; 9(2): 1164-1172, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1626656

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore and describe nurses' self-expression media image during COVID-19 pandemic in China. BACKGROUND: Nurses play an important role in COVID-19 pandemic. Although nurses were widely reported by the media, which included praise for nurses and nursing work, the researches on how nurses expressed their self-images were limited. DESIGN: Qualitative media analysis. METHODS: Qualitative media analysis was conducted from January to April 2020, the researchers collected images and texts of 16 Chinese nurses who take care of COVID-19 patients. These images and texts were published on WeChat Moments by themselves. After analysed each image and text, researchers identified the denotative and connotative elements in each image and summarized each image in narrative way. FINDINGS: This study analysed 219 pictures and 15 short videos of 16 nurses' self-expression in WeChat moments. In this study, the media image self-expression of nurses were mostly positive. The images expressed by nurses in this study included care image; hero image; soldier image; female image; hope image and team image. Nurses rarely showed negative images in the media; The negative nurses image were expressed in hidden way, which included exhausted nurses image and fragile nurses image. Moreover, the nurse self-expression media image emphasized the nursing professionalism, but less showed the nursing connotation. CONCLUSIONS: The positive media image self-expression of nurses should be encouraged. Nurse Managers should pay attention to the deficiency of nursing image expression and guide nurses to show the essence and connotation of nursing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communications Media , Nurse Administrators , Female , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 6-7, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594634

ABSTRACT

This month's column highlights health system priorities for advanced practice leaders and advanced practice infrastructure and support.


Subject(s)
Advanced Practice Nursing , Health Priorities , Leadership , Nurse Administrators , COVID-19 , Humans
12.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 537-540, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598846

ABSTRACT

Nurses and nurse leaders are working in unprecedented intense and demanding environments, and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to place strain on their mental well-being. If stressful work conditions remain at extraordinary high levels, nurses and leaders may ultimately leave their positions, creating even more uncertainty in the workforce. Enhancing individual resilience has become a superficial response in retaining nurses during a global nursing shortage. We argue that resilience is not solely an individual responsibility. Rather, resilience it is a mutual responsibility between the individual and the organization. In this article, we discuss how nurse leaders can foster organizational resilience while also enhancing their own individual resilience within the current pandemic environment, and as we transition to a post-COVID environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Nurse Administrators , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Global Health , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Mental Health , Nurse Administrators/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/psychology
13.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(6): 961-968, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586894

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this consensus paper was to convene leaders and scholars from eight Expert Panels of the American Academy of Nursing and provide recommendations to advance nursing's roles and responsibility to ensure universal access to palliative care. Part I of this consensus paper herein provides the rationale and background to support the policy, education, research, and clinical practice recommendations put forward in Part II. On behalf of the Academy, the evidence-based recommendations will guide nurses, policy makers, government representatives, professional associations, and interdisciplinary and community partners to integrate palliative nursing services across health and social care settings. The consensus paper's 43 authors represent eight countries (Australia, Canada, England, Kenya, Lebanon, Liberia, South Africa, United States of America) and extensive international health experience, thus providing a global context for the subject matter. The authors recommend greater investments in palliative nursing education and nurse-led research, nurse engagement in policy making, enhanced intersectoral partnerships with nursing, and an increased profile and visibility of palliative nurses worldwide. By enacting these recommendations, nurses working in all settings can assume leading roles in delivering high-quality palliative care globally, particularly for minoritized, marginalized, and other at-risk populations.


Subject(s)
Consensus , Expert Testimony , Hospice and Palliative Care Nursing , Palliative Care , Universal Health Care , Education, Nursing , Global Health , Healthcare Disparities , Humans , Nurse Administrators , Societies, Nursing
14.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(2): 384-392, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570888

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study is to explore the experiences of Jordanian first-line nurse managers during COVID-19. BACKGROUND: Nurses are exposed to life-threatening occupational risks during COVID-19. Exploring the first-line nurse managers' experiences will help in designing health policies to better deal with such emerging crises. METHODS: A descriptive phenomenological study was conducted. A purposive sample was used to recruit 16 first-line nurse managers from Jordanian hospitals. Semistructured interviews were conducted. Phenomenological data analysis method was used to analyse the data. RESULTS: Four major themes emerged: (a) unprecedented pressure (first-line nurse managers revealed their suffering with the unprecedented demanding situations during COVID-19 pandemic); (b) strengthening system and resilience (nurse managers employed several strategies to strengthen the health system and enhance resilience); (c) building a supportive team (the presence of a robust supportive system is vital to deal with the pandemic); and (d) maturity during the crisis (exposure to a new experience developed nurse managers management skills and self-awareness). CONCLUSIONS: The unprecedented pressure associated with COVID-19 drained first-line nurse managers physically and psychosocially. Providing adequately trained staff and medical equipment is important to better deal with crises. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Strengthening emergency training and improving emergency response plans of hospitals are essential.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(12): 595-596, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1553748

ABSTRACT

Mary Beth Kingston, PhD, RN, NEA-BC, FAAN, chief nurse executive of Advocate Aurora Health and past president of the American Organization for Nursing Leadership (AONL), interviews her mentor, Joanne Disch, PhD, RN, FAAN, who serves on the Advocate Aurora Health Board of Directors and was the inaugural chair. Dr Disch also serves as chair of the Chamberlain University Board of Trustees and is professor ad honorem at the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. This is an abridged version of the interview, which took place at the AONL Virtual Conference in 2020.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Leadership , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Risk , Adult , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , United States
16.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(2): 375-383, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1541775

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore the experiences of nurses' work stress related to COVID-19 regular epidemic prevention and control in China. BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 epidemic is still severe, and China's ongoing regular epidemic prevention and control still cannot be relaxed, which places demands on nurses. METHODS: Thirty nurses and eight nurse managers were interviewed using semistructured in-depth interviews, and the data were analysed by the Colaizzi seven-step analysis method. RESULTS: Four themes were extracted as follows: environmental factors, organizational factors, personal factors and positive factors in coping with stress. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing managers should pay attention to construction of the first-line departments of regular epidemic prevention and control. The shortage of nurses' human resources and the increase of nurse-patient conflicts are problems that need to be solved urgently. In addition, this research also emphasizes the importance of promoting nurses' stress-related growth and thinking about the possibility of reform. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: The construction of the hospital environment and increasing the resilience of nursing teams require attention. We should attach importance to the training of nurses' communication skills and provide sufficient organizational support and economic guarantees for nurses. Finally, perhaps we should also consider whether it is necessary to reform the relevant hospital systems and how to reform them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , China/epidemiology , Humans , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Am J Nurs ; 121(11): 10, 2021 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506395
19.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(1): 79-89, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504943

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore experiences of frontline nurse managers during COVID-19. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has complicated care provision and healthcare management around the world. Nurse managers have had to face the challenge of managing a crisis with precarious resources. Little research has been published about the experiences of nurse managers during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study of 10 frontline nurse managers at a highly specialized university hospital in Spain was carried out. Semi-structured interviews were conducted between June and September 2020. The Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research checklist was used for reporting. RESULTS: Six themes emerged: constant adaptation to change, participation in decision-making, management of uncertainty, prioritization of the biopsychosocial well-being of the staff, preservation of humanized care and 'one for all'. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides evidence for the experiences of nurse managers during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, analysing these experiences has helped identify some of the key competencies that these nurses must have to respond to a crisis and in their dual role as patient and nurse mediators. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Knowing about the experiences of frontline nurse managers during the pandemic can facilitate planning and preparing nurse managers for future health disasters, including subsequent waves of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurse Administrators , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 573-578, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504564

ABSTRACT

The ability to respond effectively and efficiently during times of crisis, including a pandemic, has emerged as a competency for nurse leaders. This article describes one institution's experience using the American Organization of Nurse Leaders Competencies for Nurse Executives in operationalizing the concept of surge capacity.


Subject(s)
Communication , Health Plan Implementation , Nurse Administrators/organization & administration , Professional Competence , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Chicago , Humans , United States
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