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1.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25924, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191010

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: At present, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains a significant challenge for health workers around the world. This survey aims to highlight the status of the implementation of occupational protection measures for nurses working on the front line against COVID-19, and to analyze the problems in the process of wearing protective equipment.This cross-sectional study was conducted among 165 nurses who worked in COVID-19-stricken areas in China in March 2020. The questionnaire covered 3 aspects, namely: general information, the current condition of protective equipment wearing, and the wearing experience of protective equipment.A total of 160 (96.97%) valid questionnaires were collected. The average time of wearing protective equipment for the nurses surveyed was 6.38 ±â€Š3.30 hours per working day. For first-line nurses with low risk of infection, repeated wear of protective equipment was as follows: medical protective mask 30.77%, double latex gloves 8.46%, goggles/protective mask 15.38%, protective suit 15.38%; less wear of protective equipment were as follows: work cap 7.69%, surgical mask 7.69%, single layer latex gloves 30.77%, goggles/protective mask 30.77%, and isolation gown 46.15%. For nurses who were at moderate risk of infection, repeated wear of protective equipment was as follows: surgical mask 62.22%, goggles/protective mask 68.89%, and isolation gown 65.56%; less wear: work cap 3.33%, medical protective mask 15.56%, latex gloves 15.56%, goggles/protective mask 5.56%, and protective suit 16.67%. For front-line nurses with high risk of infection, repeated wear of protective equipment was as follows: surgical mask 64.91%, more than double latex gloves 8.77%, goggles/protective mask 75.44%, isolation gown 75.44%; less wear: work cap 1.75%, medical protective mask 1.75%, latex gloves 26.32%, goggles/ protective mask 1.75%, protective suit 1.75%. The main discomforts of wearing protective equipment were poor vision due to fogging (81.88%), stuffiness (79.38%), poor mobility (74.38%), sweating (72.5%), and skin damage (61.25%).More detailed personal protection standards should be developed, and the work load of nurses should be reduced. Actions should be taken to ensure the scientific implementation of personal protective measures. To solve practical clinical problems, future protective equipment may focus on the research and development of protective equipment applicable for different risk levels, as well as the research on integrated design, fabric innovation, and reusability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto, Online) ; 32: e3234, 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2197535

ABSTRACT

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic evidenced a scenario of increased demands on health professionals that can lead to professional burnout. This study aimed to investigate Burnout Syndrome (BS) and associated factors in nursing professionals working in intensive care units (ICU) of the public service during the COVID-19 pandemic. 157 professionals were evaluated regarding sociodemographic, occupational and working conditions variables, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used. The prevalence of BS was 45.2%, with some professionals suffering from more than one factor of the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (28.7%), depersonalization (3.8%) and low professional fulfillment (24.8%). Logistic regression analysis in the final model showed that female gender, not having children, statutory bond, professionals who had COVID-19 and declared wanting to leave the ICU environment had a higher risk of BS. The results showed BS in nursing professionals and that new risk factors were added with the advent of the pandemic.


Resumo A pandemia de COVID-19 evidenciou um cenário de acréscimo de demandas aos profissionais de saúde que pode levar ao esgotamento profissional. Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar a Síndrome de Burnout (SB) e fatores associados em profissionais de enfermagem nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI) durante a pandemia de COVID-19. Foram avaliados 157 profissionais em relação às variáveis sociodemográficas, ocupacionais e condições de trabalho, e o Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) foi utilizado. A prevalência da SB foi de 45,2%, com alguns profissionais em mais de um fator da síndrome: exaustão emocional (28,7%), despersonalização (3,8%) e baixa realização profissional (24,8%). Análise de regressão logística no modelo final mostrou que o gênero feminino, não ter filhos, vínculo estatutário, profissionais que tiveram COVID-19 e que declararam querer sair do ambiente de UTI tiveram maior risco de presença da SB. Os resultados evidenciaram SB nos profissionais de enfermagem e que novos fatores de risco foram acrescidos com o advento da pandemia.


Resumen La pandemia de la COVID-19 evidenció un escenario de mayores exigencias a los profesionales de la salud que puede derivar en desgaste profesional. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo investigar el Síndrome de Burnout (BS) y factores asociados en los profesionales de enfermería en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) durante la pandemia. Los 157 profesionales fueron evaluados con relación a las variables sociodemográficas, ocupacionales y condiciones de trabajo, y se utilizó el Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). La prevalencia de SB fue del 45,2%, con algunos profesionales que sufren de más de un factor del síndrome: agotamiento emocional (28,7%), despersonalización (3,8%) y baja realización profesional (24,8%). El análisis de regresión logística mostró que el sexo femenino, no tener hijos, la relación laboral reglamentaria, los profesionales que contrajeron COVID-19 y que declararon querer salir del entorno de la UCI tuvieron un mayor riesgo de presencia de SB. Los resultados mostraron SB en profesionales de enfermería y que se agregaron nuevos factores de riesgo con el advenimiento de la pandemia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Burnout, Professional , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Nurse Practitioners , Nurses , Risk Factors , Pandemics
3.
Rech Soins Infirm ; 148(1): 89-106, 2022.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143942

ABSTRACT

Introduction : At the beginning of 2020, a public health emergency was declared in France following the emergence of the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic.Context : Nurses involved in an advanced practice mobilized their specific skills during this health crisis by drawing on the available resources.Objectives : To analyze personal resources used by those nurses in the process of skill mobilization during the pandemic.Method : Sequential mixed research, first quantitative and then qualitative, concerning nurses or students enrolled in an advanced practice curriculum.Results : Our analysis highlighted two groups of activity for those nurses : frontline workers against COVID-19 or coordination. Coordination seemed to present more opportunities to use the specific skills of advance practice nursing.Discussion : Adjustment strategies for stress (coping and hardiness) boost nurses' commitment to their professional practice. Disciplinary knowledge contributes to the enrichment of the knowledge necessary for the mobilization of skills.Conclusion : Future research should explore resources and the mobilization of skills in the implementation of advance practice nursing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , France , Humans , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Nurses' , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Front Public Health ; 10: 992466, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142334

ABSTRACT

During this pandemic, it is crucial to implement early interventions to help nurses manage their mental wellbeing by providing them with information regarding coping skills, preventive risk assessment approaches (such as hospital preparedness and rapid risk assessment), and the ability to respond. This study evaluated the effect of fear and risk assessment management on nurses' mental wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic in Saudi Arabia. A total of 507 nurses who worked in tertiary public hospitals were asked to take a descriptive design survey. Three survey scales were used to assess the survey: the Risk Assessment Scale, the Fear of COVID-19 Scale, and the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Wellbeing Scale. Independent t-tests and a one-way ANOVA were used to examine the association between fear of COVID-19 and nurses' demographic characteristics on their mental wellbeing. A multiple regression analysis was performed to examine the predictors associated with mental wellbeing. Findings revealed that almost half of the participants showed moderate positive mental wellbeing, 49.7%, while only 14% had low levels of fear on the Warwick-Edinburgh Mental Well being Scale. Most of the respondents had low levels of fear on the Fear of COVID-19 Scale, 45%, while only 15% had high levels of fear on the scale. Then, some demographic variables, such as "age," "nationality," "total years of experience in the current hospital," and "region you work at" had statistically significant differences with p < 0.5. Meanwhile, risk assessment is also associated with mental wellbeing scores. All items on the Fear of COVID-19 Scale showed no significant difference with a P > 0.05. In conclusion, most nurses providing direct patient care to a patient with COVID-19 emphasized the importance of wearing PPE and performing hand hygiene before and after any clean or aseptic procedure. Meanwhile, although almost all nurses were vaccinated, they were still afraid of a COVID-19 infection. Additionally, the results reported that the older the nurses are, the better their mental wellbeing scores. Non-Saudi nurses had higher perceived mental wellbeing scores than Saudi nurses, and different working environments corresponded to different mental wellbeing scores. Finally, nurses' risk assessment was associated with mental wellbeing scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear , Risk Assessment , Perception
5.
Am J Nurs ; 122(12): 24-31, 2022 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117175

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Amid the challenges of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, health care workers are using social media to publish increasing numbers of posts, memes, and videos. On TikTok, a rapidly growing and widely used social networking platform, videos labeled "dancing nurses" have recently been trending. Whether nurses or the general public consider such videos to breach professional ethical standards is unknown. PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to analyze and describe the use of the social media platform TikTok by nurses whose videos featured dancing nurses during the ongoing pandemic. METHODS: Between March 1 and December 31, 2020, we conducted a search on TikTok using terms such as dancing nurse and hashtags such as "#dancingnurse." For each identified video, the numbers of followers, views, likes, concurrent COVID-19 morbidity and mortality rates, and other data were collected. For videos meeting the inclusion criteria, content analysis was performed to evaluate dancing nurse behaviors and apply the American Nurses Association (ANA) Code of Ethics for Nurses with Interpretive Statements, ANA social networking principles, and National Council of State Boards of Nursing social media guidelines. RESULTS: A total of 52 videos met all inclusion criteria and were included for analysis. These videos had a mean of 1.51 million views each. Among these videos, there were 356 violations of Code of Ethics provisions, social networking principles, and social media guidelines. Forty of the videos (77%) included a choreographed dance; 24 (46%) contained twerking and three (6%) featured dance moves such as pelvic thrusts and gyrations. CONCLUSION: The findings offer insight into how nurses are using TikTok, specifically with regard to posting videos that feature dancing nurses. Some of the analyzed videos included content that could be construed, in our view, as inappropriate and even sexually suggestive. The concern is that such videos could damage the professional image of nurses and downplay the seriousness of the current pandemic. It's essential that nurses who use social media consider the content and presentation of what they post. There is an urgent need for nurses to understand professional and workplace guidelines and policies regarding the use of social media, and how these may apply to content developed and posted on platforms such as TikTok.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dancing , Nurses , Social Media , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics
6.
Nurs Manage ; 53(5): 6, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1843338
7.
Am J Nurs ; 122(11): 32-38, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107597
8.
Eur J Oncol Nurs ; 61: 102207, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2104849

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The covid-19 global pandemic has impacted on nurses who have rapidly adapted to new ways of working, and experienced negative impacts due to over-stretched services. Two surveys captured the experiences of lung cancer and mesothelioma specialist nurses in the United Kingdom (UK) in 2020, but the impact of later stages of the pandemic was unknown. This study aimed to explore the impact of covid-19 on lung Cancer and mesothelioma nurses since January 2021, the second wave of the pandemic. METHODS: An online cross-sectional survey with both open and closed questions explored the impact of covid-19 on ways of working and workload, quality of care, and health and wellbeing. The survey was open to UK based lung cancer and mesothelioma advanced or specialist nurses. RESULTS: 85 nurses responded to the survey. The majority were Clinical Nurse Specialists, based in England. Respondents reported changes in ways of working due to redeployment, staff shortages, and home working. Widespread adoption of virtual working practices led to concerns of negative impacts. Perceived excessive workload impacted on care with two-thirds of the sample (57, 67%) reporting they had been unable to provide the same quality of care to patients. Impacts on nurses' health and wellbeing were reported with two-thirds of the sample (56, 66%) reporting a deterioration in emotional wellbeing and mental health. Coping mechanisms employed included online team support to share experiences and increased uptake of exercise; however, impacts on lifestyle and access to coping mechanisms varied. CONCLUSION: Nurses have stepped up to the challenges of the pandemic with teamwork and innovation, but pressure arising from the pandemic and high workloads led to negative impacts on wellbeing. The authors have provided recommendations to improve patient care and support the wellbeing of nurses, which will be key to a resilient workforce living with covid-19. Whilst this study focussed on lung cancer and mesothelioma specialists, the findings have wider implications for other cancer specialties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Mesothelioma , Nurse Clinicians , Nurses , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Am J Nurs ; 122(11): 57, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2103100

ABSTRACT

A journalist investigates and offers a way forward.


Subject(s)
Grief , Nurses , Physicians , Psychological Distress , Humans , Physicians/psychology , Nurses/psychology
10.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(2): 245-258, 2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1819287

ABSTRACT

This article highlights the critical role of advanced practice registered nurses in the care of older adults living in nursing homes. This population is one of the frailest, marginalized, and often neglected in the United States. The COVID-19 pandemic impact on nursing homes resulted in a stunning number of infections and subsequent resident deaths. This is a shameful reminder of the many challenges and gaps in the nursing home industry including inadequate staffing, high staff turnover, improper isolation technique, and lack of fundamental knowledge of how to adequately implement infection prevention and control processes. Strong advanced practice registered nurse leadership may have mitigated some of these factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Aged , Humans , Leadership , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , United States
11.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(2): 287-293, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100760

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Since the declaration of the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak as pandemic, health workers have shown an incredible commitment to their patients, sometimes in apocalyptic conditions. We explored ways to deal with the coronavirus stressor and psychological outcomes among physicians and nurses. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: 124 healthcare workers in General Hospital Nasice (Croatia) were invited to participate in a study by performing within the period of March 26 to April 6 2020 questionnaire collected information on socio-demographic characteristics and living conditions that may be risk factors for covid-19 concern, Short form health survey-36, Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21) and Ways of Coping Questionnaire (WOC; consisting of 8 subscales: Confrontive Coping, Distancing, Self-Controlling, Seeking Social Support, Accepting Responsibility, Escape-Avoidance, Planful Problem Solving, Positive Reappraisal). RESULTS: 11% healthworkers reports moderate to very-severe depression, 17% moderate to extremely-severe anxiety and 10% for moderate to extremely-severe stress. 67% of medical staff are worried. No statistically significant differences in the scales of depression, anxiety, and stress were found between nurses and physicians, but differences were found on Escape-Avoidance and Positive Reappraisal subscales. Nurses use significantly more avoiding coping style and positive reappraisal than doctors. Seeking social support is more pronounced in those over 40 years old, while those under 40 use more avoidable stress management techniques. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring and ensuring the mental health of coronavirus care staff is crucial for global health. The education of medical staff in the field of stress management is a conditio sine qua non of the issue of an adequate relationship with the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Surveys , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19 , Child , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Croatia/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
12.
ANS Adv Nurs Sci ; 45(4): 351-370, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097470

ABSTRACT

Schools play a critical role in students' diabetes management and ensure their safety and well-being. We conducted key informant interviews with 11 school nurses in Missouri to assess determinants for diabetes care implementation. Five themes and 29 subthemes were identified concerning school nurses, schools, external stakeholders, government, and the COVID-19 pandemic. A social-ecological model was developed to elucidate each level's barriers, facilitators, and resources, and their interplay. School nurses should lead diabetes management, emergency planning, and health education for students/staff. Multiple gray areas existed regarding school nurses' specific roles/responsibilities. Lacking funding, insurance, and communication with parents/physicians further challenged diabetes care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Nurses , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Students , Parents , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090194

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses were exposed to many stressors, which may have been associated with some mental health problems. However, most of the studies carried out on nurses' quality of life and workplace wellbeing during the COVID-19 pandemic took a pathogenic approach. Given that current scientific knowledge in this field presented too many gaps to properly inform preventive and therapeutic action, the aim of this study was to explore whether protective factors (resilience, perceived social support, and professional identification) and stressors (perceived stress and psychosocial risks in the workplace) influenced the quality of life and workplace wellbeing perceived by Portuguese nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. Data for this cross-sectional study was collected through online self-administered questionnaires. Linear regression models were used to analyze the relationships between variables. Results showed that perceived stress, resilience and job satisfaction were associated with quality of life and workplace wellbeing among Portuguese nurses. The study's findings could serve to inform health policy and should draw the attention of nursing managers to the needs and difficulties reported by nurses, to the importance of providing them with emotional support, and to the relevance of promoting a good work environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workplace/psychology , Pandemics , Quality of Life , Cross-Sectional Studies , Protective Factors , Portugal/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(11): 574-576, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087910

ABSTRACT

Nurses play an important role in pandemic and disaster response, often at a personal cost to their overall well-being. Interviews with 19 frontline COVID-19 nurses helped illuminate priority focus areas involving nurses in the planning process, providing clear communication and offering mental health services. These recommendations align with and reinforce conclusions and recommendations from The Future of Nursing 2020-2030 Report.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disasters , Nurses , Humans , Pandemics , Communication
15.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 65: 103492, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2086589

ABSTRACT

AIM: To examine the relationship between the nurses' behavioral intention to use virtual clinical simulation training and study variables, including perceived usefulness, perceived ease of use, self-efficacy, technology anxiety, perceived enjoyment and personal innovativeness. BACKGROUND: Little is known about the nurses' behavioral intentions behind using virtual clinical simulation training. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: A total of 206 registered nurses participated in this survey. Data were collected through online survey from March 20, 2021, to April 2, 2021, since entry into the hospital was strictly controlled due to the COVID-19 outbreak. RESULTS: Structural equation modeling identified that both perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use were the predictors which influenced behavioral intention. Additionally, perceived enjoyment indirectly affected behavioral intention by influencing both perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use. CONCLUSION: The successful introduction of virtual clinical simulation training depends on nurses' willingness and acceptance of its use. The findings of this study show that virtual clinical simulation training should be perceived as useful, easy to use and enjoyable to be accepted by nurses. Virtual clinical simulation programs may have the potential to help improve nurses' clinical skills and competencies in patient care. TWEETABLE ABSTRACT: This study revealed that the usefulness of its contents, ease of use and enjoyment are important to increase nurses' behavioral intention to use virtual clinical simulation training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Simulation Training , Humans , Intention , Cross-Sectional Studies , Latent Class Analysis , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Perianesth Nurs ; 37(6): 973-974, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2082219
18.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(41): e31197, 2022 Oct 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2077963

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to investigate the factors related to Japanese nurses' desire to quit their jobs during the Omicron wave of the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic. We distributed an original, self-administered questionnaire to nurses at 3 facilities that accepted patients with coronavirus disease 2019 in Ishikawa Prefecture, Japan. Of the 625 nurses, 152 responded (24.3%); after excluding 3 men to rule out the effects of sex, responses for 81 (53.3%) nurses were analyzed. In total, 49 (60.5%) nurses expressed a desire to quit their current job. After controlling for the effects of age and years of experience, factors related to the desire to quit the current job included having fewer than 2 years of experience (odds ratio [OR] 9.08, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.69-48.87), feeling anxiety at work (OR 4.59, 95% CI 1.01-20.81), being afraid to go to work (OR 4.10, 95% CI 1.20-21.69), and experiencing difficulty talking to people (OR 10.26, 95% CI 1.48-70.99). Nurse managers should regularly screen nurses who have fewer than 2 years of experience, feel anxiety at work, are afraid to go to work, and find it difficult to talk to people. Early action may prevent the turnover of nurses during a public health emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066069

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic is a major public health problem with millions of confirmed cases and deaths described. Nurses are among the health care professionals most involved at the front line, caring for those affected by COVID-19. Patients and families have been subjected to a high emotional burden of fear, anxiety, and uncertainty. The COVID-19 pandemic has had a significant impact on the approach to patients, the organisation of care, and communication with patients and their families, all requiring considerable adaptation on the part of nurses and health care professionals. The overall aim of this research was to find out the needs of patients with COVID-19, the nursing interventions provided and their outcomes, and to explore the experiences of the nurses, patients, and caregivers. A mixed method study will be performed with a convergent design. The study was divided into three phases. Quantitative methods involved nurses and patients affected by COVID-19 with a questionnaire. Qualitative methods involved nurses, patients, and caregivers with interviews and finally a quantitative analysis of the nursing documentation of the interviewed patients. We hope that this study will help us to understand and identify the main nursing and support needs expressed by patients and their families at different stages of their illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , COVID-19/epidemiology , Caregivers/psychology , Communication , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Multicenter Studies as Topic , Pandemics , Qualitative Research
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Oct 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066035

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 pandemic brings many challenges to the daily work of nurses. While carrying out professional tasks for patients infected with the SARS-CoV-2 virus, nurses experience tremendous psychological pressure due to their workload in a high-risk environment. This causes severe stress and leads to occupational burnout. The purpose of this study was to assess the level of stress and occupational burnout among surveyed nurses working with patients with COVID-19. A total of 118 nurses working with patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 virus participated in the study. Among the respondents, there were 94.9% women and 5.1% men. The average age of the respondents was 38.1 +/- 2.1. The survey was conducted between April and May 2022. The research tool was a survey questionnaire, consisting of three parts: sociodemographic data and self-administered survey questionnaire containing questions about the specifics of working with COVID-19 patients. The third part was a standardized tool: the MBI Burnout Questionnaire by Christina Maslach. Participation in the study was anonymous and voluntary. Statistical analysis for independence of variables used the Chi-square test. On the other hand, coefficients based on the Phi test and Kramer's V test, as well as non-parametric Mann-Whitney U-test (for 2 samples) and Kruskal-Wallis test (for more than 2 samples) were used to determine the strength of the relationship. During these analyses, in addition to standard statistical significance, the corresponding "p" values were calculated using the Monte Carlo method. The results obtained allow us to conclude that surveyed nurses working with COVID-19 patients are exposed to various stressors leading to occupational burnout. The vast majority of respondents, i.e., 90.7%, believe that stress is an integral part of the nursing profession and the average of MBI burnout among respondents was 55.67 +/- 9.77 pts., emotional exhaustion 24.74 +/- 6.11, depersonalization 12.42 +/- 2.99 and a sense of personal achievement 18.52 +/- 4.50 which means that only slightly more than half of the nurses surveyed noticed symptoms of occupational burnout themselves. The research has revealed that working with a patient who is positive for COVID-19 is a cause of stress and is related to experiencing symptoms of burnout in the group of surveyed nurses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
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