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1.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(1): 35-41, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612729

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has overwhelmed health care systems globally. To understand how health care systems can best support frontline health care providers caring for patients in similar situations, it is necessary to gain insights into their experience. PURPOSE: This quality improvement study explored the lived experience of Canadian frontline medicine nurses caring for COVID-19 patients during the first wave of the pandemic. METHOD: A qualitative interpretive phenomenological approach was conducted. Forty-three eligible nurses participated in semistructured interviews and online surveys. Full transcription and thematic content analysis were performed. RESULTS: Three overarching themes were deduced: (1) a traumatic experience, (2) living through the experience, and (3) achieving transcendence. CONCLUSION: Several recommendations were identified. These recommendations aim to aid health care systems in emergency preparation planning and future pandemic responses while supporting frontline health care providers' resilience and well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Canada , Humans , Pandemics , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
2.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 22-30, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the perceptions and experiences of nurses caring for patients and families under the COVID-19 pandemic's socially restrictive practices and policies. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic has affected the delivery of health care to patients and their families, with many aspects altered because of the need for social distancing, social isolation, and visitation restriction policies. These policies have created communication challenges for interdisciplinary health care teams, patients, and families. As frontline caregivers, nurses have felt strongly the impact of these challenges. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted among 17 RNs who were caring for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and were recruited via social media posts on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Watson's theory of human caring served as the conceptual framework for the study. RESULTS: Several themes emerged regarding nurses' experiences of communication with patients and families. These include communication challenges and barriers, prioritization, integration of group communication, nurse self-reflection, and acceptance of gratitude. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings underscore the importance of nurses' communication with patients and families under the pandemic's restricted conditions. They demonstrate the value of nurses' ability to innovate in fostering all parties' participation in the plan of care, and highlight the comfort nurses provide to patients who are isolated from loved ones. Strategies that fostered communication were identified, as were areas for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Empathy , Nurses/psychology , Professional-Family Relations , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Nurses/trends , Qualitative Research
3.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7964-7970, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608921

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to develop mental health nursing strategies for the inbound quarantined population based on the results of a survey study and frontline nursing experiences. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A mixed research method was selected, we collected data by questionnaires from 128 quarantined people, and by semi-structured interviews from 5 registered nurses. Generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7), the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) were used in the quantitative research to identify the prevalence of psychological issues and risk factors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the qualitative study to conclude nursing experiences from RNs. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia were 34%, 41%, and 18% respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that social support, urban residence, and chronic disease were associated with mental health problems in certain aspects. Three themes were emerged from the analysis of RNs interviews: personality, chronic diseases, and social support. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of mental health issues in the inbound quarantined population was the same as the general population in the initial stage of COVID-19 outbreak, and significantly lower than people who lived in high-risk areas. Living in urban areas, with chronic diseases, and obtaining less social support are the risk factors. Finally, four nursing strategies were proposed by the research team for mental health well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/organization & administration , Psychiatric Nursing/organization & administration , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Professional Role , Quarantine/standards , Risk Factors , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/prevention & control , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Social Support/psychology , Social Support/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
4.
Nursing ; 52(1): 29-32, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1606527

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Pandemic-related stress factors have been profoundly impacting the wellness of nurses, resulting in job burnout, moral distress, and some nurses deciding to leave the profession. This article examines strategies to identify stressors and develop self-care and coping skills.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(1): 79-85, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1604045

ABSTRACT

Analysis of Current Population Survey data suggests a tightening labor market for registered nurses, licensed practical nurses, and nursing assistants, marked by falling employment and rising wages through June 2021. Unemployment rates remain higher in nonhospital settings and among registered nurses and nursing assistants who are members of racial and ethnic minority groups.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Employment , Humans , Minority Groups , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 537-540, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598846

ABSTRACT

Nurses and nurse leaders are working in unprecedented intense and demanding environments, and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to place strain on their mental well-being. If stressful work conditions remain at extraordinary high levels, nurses and leaders may ultimately leave their positions, creating even more uncertainty in the workforce. Enhancing individual resilience has become a superficial response in retaining nurses during a global nursing shortage. We argue that resilience is not solely an individual responsibility. Rather, resilience it is a mutual responsibility between the individual and the organization. In this article, we discuss how nurse leaders can foster organizational resilience while also enhancing their own individual resilience within the current pandemic environment, and as we transition to a post-COVID environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Nurse Administrators , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Global Health , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Mental Health , Nurse Administrators/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/psychology
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(12): e049668, 2021 12 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598698

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The COVID-19 pandemic has influenced hospital work and healthcare workers all over the world. We explored how Danish nurses coped with the fast, comprehensive organisational changes in their workplace and identified barriers to and facilitators for organisations ensuring the best possible conditions for nurses to meet these challenges. The study focuses on the organisational setting and how it did or did not support the nurses in their work. METHODS: A qualitative explorative design was used in interviewing 23 nurses who had worked at a COVID-19 ward in one of three hospitals. Data were collected in the summer of 2020, and the analysis was inspired by Paul Ricoeur's theory of narratives and interpretation. RESULTS: The presence of managers in the wards helped the nurses in the form of psychological and practical support. Working within an organisation that provides a safe environment was essential for nurses. The experience of a safe environment allowed nurses to ask questions, which supported them in finding solutions to specific tasks in the new and critical working environment. Barriers to handling the new situation were an absence of managers and a lack of a sense of belongingness and trust. CONCLUSION: This study highlights the need for management to be present in the ward and for organisational support to be available to nurses so they can provide optimal treatment and care when working in new and unknown conditions during a pandemic. Practical assistance from managers to ease the job is beneficial. Furthermore, the presence of management is essential to provide psychological support and create a safe environment because this allows nurses to ask questions about how to better manage new and critical tasks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Denmark/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Organizational Innovation , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Adv Exp Med Biol ; 1337: 127-135, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596047

ABSTRACT

Social distancing and the recent lock down due to COVID-19 has increased the feeling of disconnection, isolation, and suffering in vulnerable individuals and has brought forward questions regarding open acute care psychiatric units that cannot be answered by the literature. In Greece, there is no available research on how open ward environments are perceived and experienced by mental health professionals. The aim of the present study was to illuminate nurses' experiences of working in a public psychiatric hospital which traditionally operates with open doors. Eleven nursing care providers were interviewed, and thematic analysis was employed to explore their experiences of working in locked psychiatric acute care units. Participants described nursing care in units with an open door policy as "acceptance," "availability of staff," "real respect for the person," "ensuring patients' rights," "listening to the person," and "negotiation and not imposition." Trust in therapeutic relationships was perceived as greatly dependent on the trust being given to patients indirectly by the open door policy. Being trusted enhanced patients' self-determination and self-confidence leading to their empowerment. Containment of an acute mental health crisis took place through medication and meaningful discussions with patients and significant others rather than locking the door of the unit. Overall, meaningful care led to professional emancipation, but compassion fatigue narratives emphasized the need for continuous education, support and clinical supervision as necessary support for mental health nurses in a system of mental health provision often reduced to the point of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Policy , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580737

ABSTRACT

Little is known about how COVID-19 affects older patients living at home or how it affects district nursing teams providing care to these patients. This study aims to (1) explore, from the perspectives of Dutch district nurses, COVID-19's impact on patients receiving district nursing care, district nursing teams, and their organisations during the first outbreak in March 2020 as well as one year later; and (2) identify the needs of district nurses regarding future outbreaks. A mixed-methods, two-phase, sequential exploratory design was followed. In total, 36 district nurses were interviewed during the first outbreak (March 2020), of which 18 participated in the follow-up questionnaire in April 2021. Thirteen themes emerged, which showed that the COVID pandemic has substantially impacted patient care and district nursing teams. During the first outbreak, nurses played a crucial role in organising care differently and worked under high pressure, leading to exhaustion, tiredness, and psychosocial problems, including fear of infection. A year later, nurses were better prepared to provide COVID care, but problems regarding work pressure and mental complaints remained. The identified needs focus on a sustainable implementation of leadership roles for district nurses. At the organisational and national levels, more support and appreciation are needed in terms of trust and appropriate policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Disease Outbreaks , Humans , Leadership , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Psychiatr Danub ; 33(4): 626-633, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1579390

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The sudden outbreak of COVID-19 has put nurses into a severe test, both physiologically and psychologically. While being required to provide patients with high-quality medical services, nurses also bear the responsibilities and pressures from work, face trauma, disease and even death events, and are thereby more inclined to negative psychological feelings, decline in mental health, and reduction in the quality of their clinical nursing services. Under the background of the COVID-19 epidemic, it is urgent to carry out related intervention in nurses' psychological crisis. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: The mental health of 400 nurses from three tertiary hospitals in Shanghai, China was assessed from September to December 2020. Then, time management training was conducted for 66 nurses who were voluntarily enrolled in the study. They were divided into the intervention group (35 participants) and the control group (31 participants). RESULTS: After the 16-week intervention, (1) there is a significant decrease in the total SCL-90 score of the intervention group and significant decreases in the scores in the 9 dimensions of the scale, suggesting significant improvement in the mental health level; (2) there is a significant increase in the score of the intervention group in subjective well-being, while there is no significant increase in the control group; (3) There is a significant decrease in the score of the intervention group in work stress reaction, but there is no significant decrease in the control group, and there is a significant increase in the physiological reaction of the control group in the measurement after 8 weeks. CONCLUSIONS: It is critical to pay attention to and solve the low mental health level of nurses during the COVID-19 epidemic; Time management training can effectively improve the mental health level of nurses, and it is an effective intervention model to promote nurses' mental health and relieve their work stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , China , Humans , Mental Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Time Management
11.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247794, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575402

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identified in December 2019 in the city of Wuhan, China, the outbreak of COVID-19 spread throughout the world and its impacts affect different populations differently, where countries with high levels of social and economic inequality such as Brazil gain prominence, for understanding of the vulnerability factors associated with the disease. Given this scenario, in the absence of a vaccine or safe and effective antiviral treatment for COVID-19, nonpharmacological measures are essential for prevention and control of the disease. However, many of these measures are not feasible for millions of individuals who live in territories with increased social vulnerability. The study aims to analyze the spatial distribution of COVID-19 incidence in Brazil's municipalities (counties) and investigate its association with sociodemographic determinants to better understand the social context and the epidemic's spread in the country. METHODS: This is an analytical ecological study using data from various sources. The study period was February 25 to September 26, 2020. Data analysis used global regression models: ordinary least squares (OLS), spatial autoregressive model (SAR), and conditional autoregressive model (CAR) and the local regression model called multiscale geographically weighted regression (MGWR). FINDINGS: The higher the GINI index, the higher the incidence of the disease at the municipal level. Likewise, the higher the nurse ratio per 1,000 inhabitants in the municipalities, the higher the COVID-19 incidence. Meanwhile, the proportional mortality ratio was inversely associated with incidence of the disease. DISCUSSION: Social inequality increased the risk of COVID-19 in the municipalities. Better social development of the municipalities was associated with lower risk of the disease. Greater access to health services improved the diagnosis and notification of the disease and was associated with more cases in the municipalities. Despite universal susceptibility to COVID-19, populations with increased social vulnerability were more exposed to risk of the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Cities/epidemiology , Demography , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Spatial Analysis , Spatial Regression
12.
Nursing ; 51(7): 52-56, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561264

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Little is known about the psychological impact of trauma from pandemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores a descriptive study on the impact of COVID-19 and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder among RNs caring for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Self Report
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554869

ABSTRACT

Caring for people with COVID-19 on the front line has psychological impacts for healthcare professionals. Despite the important psychological impacts of the pandemic on nurses, the qualitative evidence on this topic has not been synthesized. Our objective: To analyze and synthesize qualitative studies that investigate the perceptions of nurses about the psychological impacts of treating hospitalized people with COVID-19 on the front line. A systematic review of qualitative studies published in English or Spanish up to March 2021 was carried out in the following databases: The Cochrane Library, Medline (Pubmed), PsycINFO, Web of Science (WOS), Scopus, and CINHAL. The PRISMA statement and the Cochrane recommendations for qualitative evidence synthesis were followed. Results: The main psychological impacts of caring for people with COVID-19 perceived by nurses working on the front line were fear, anxiety, stress, social isolation, depressive symptoms, uncertainty, and frustration. The fear of infecting family members or being infected was the main repercussion perceived by the nurses. Other negative impacts that this review added and that nurses suffer as the COVID-19 pandemic progress were anger, obsessive thoughts, compulsivity, introversion, apprehension, impotence, alteration of space-time perception, somatization, and feeling of betrayal. Resilience was a coping tool used by nurses. Conclusions: Front line care for people with COVID-19 causes fear, anxiety, stress, social isolation, depressive symptoms, uncertainty, frustration, anger, obsessive thoughts, compulsivity, introversion, apprehension, impotence, alteration of space-time perception, somatization, and feeling of betrayal in nurses. It is necessary to provide front line nurses with the necessary support to reduce the psychological impact derived from caring for people with COVID-19, improve training programs for future pandemics, and analyze the long-term impacts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Anxiety , Anxiety Disorders , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(1): 5-18, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1550626

ABSTRACT

Work cultures supportive of wellness and shorter shift length have been associated with better mental/physical health outcomes in nurses, but how the coronavirus disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic impacted such outcomes is not known. This study's aims were to (1) describe the mental/physical health, well-being, and healthy lifestyle behaviors of nurses during the pandemic; (2) explore the pandemic's impact on their health and healthy lifestyle behaviors; and (3) determine the associations of perceived workplace wellness support and shift length with nurses' health, well-being, and healthy lifestyle behaviors. A cross-sectional descriptive design was used with 264 nurses associated with Trusted Health. Nurses completed a survey containing valid and reliable scales measuring depression, anxiety, burnout and quality of life, perceived wellness culture, and healthy lifestyle behaviors. Results indicated that more than 50% of nurses had worsening mental/physical health relating to the pandemic. Compared with nurses whose workplaces provided little/no wellness support, nurses with workplaces that supported their wellness were 3 to 9 times as likely to have better mental/physical health, no/little stress, no burnout, and high quality of life. Nurses who worked longer shifts had poorer health outcomes. These findings indicate that workplace wellness support and shorter shifts positively impacted nurse mental/physical health and professional quality of life amidst the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Life Style , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
15.
Work ; 70(2): 347-354, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538353

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the COVID-19 pandemic in Iran, the number of patients admitted to hospitals and the workload of nurses has increased. High workload can reduce efficiency and quality of life. In the meantime the percived social support may had a moderating role. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of workload and perceived social support on quality of life in nurses who work in COVID-19 inpatient wards. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional descriptive-analytic study. 336 nurses who worked in inpatient wards with COVID-19 patients were randomly selected and studied. NASA-TLX Workload Questionnaire, WHO Quality of Life Questionnaire and Multidimensional Social Support Perception Scale were used to data collection. Structural equation modelling in PLS software was used to modelling. RESULTS: The results showed that the average score of workload, perceived social support and quality of life were 80.87±20.17, 56.23±11.46 and 55.87±13.74, respectively. A significant inverse relationship was observed between workload and quality of life (P < 0.05). Also, perceived social support had a moderator effect on relationship between workload and quality of life (P < 0.05). CONCLUSIONS: High workload can upset the balance between work and life that leads to decrease the quality of life. Perceived social support as a moderator can reduce the negative impact of workload on quality of life. In the COVID-19 pandemic where nurses' workload have increased, by increasing the perceived social support can manage the negative effect of workload.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Support , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
16.
Clin Ter ; 172(6): 559-563, 2021 Nov 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1534516

ABSTRACT

Aim: To develop and test the effectiveness of an E-learning program for promoting physical activity (PA) and wellness among nurses. Background: Restrictions during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic drastically changed many people's lives. Maintaining a healthy lifestyle is an everyday challenge faced by the general popula-tion. Nurses are one of the health care professionals who are typically well-educated in taking care of patients. There are studies that show that night shifts, extended shifts, and obesity have a correlation with the prevalence of acute low back pain among female nurses. PA is the key factor in the prevention and treatment of many chronic diseases, resulting in an improvement in the quality of life. The impact of social media and technology on our lives is undeniable in the modern era. Design: This study will be a single-centre, single-blind, randomi-zed controlled trial executed on an E-learning platform to provide the control and intervention groups with a distance learning program. Par-ticipants will be randomly assigned to either the control or intervention group. Participants in the control group will only sign up for module 1 of the PA modules, which only comprises information on PA and health promotion. On the other hand, the participants in the intervention group are expected to carry out 3 modules of exercises at home three days a week for a total duration of 8 weeks. The exercises will be performed at moderate intensity (5-6 on the Borg CR10 Scale). Ethical issues: This trial will comply with the declaration of Helsinki 1975, as revised in 2000. Informed written consent will be obtained from the participants. The Sapienza University of Rome, institutional ethics committee and review board approval will be requested for this study. Conclusion: Establishing an online PA program with good quality, such as a high level of convenience in access and use, simplified, easy to practice, and made available on social media, can minimize the difficulties faced previously in the implementation of an online PA program for nurses, and may enhance the health and wellbeing of many nurses in healthcare institutions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Nurses , Exercise , Female , Humans , Quality of Life , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Single-Blind Method
17.
Hum Resour Health ; 19(1): 112, 2021 09 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1533262

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses and midwives play a critical role in the provision of care and the optimization of health services resources worldwide, which is particularly relevant during the current COVID-19 pandemic. However, they can only provide quality services if their work environment provides adequate conditions to support them. Today the employment and working conditions of many nurses worldwide are precarious, and the current pandemic has prompted more visibility to the vulnerability to health-damaging factors of nurses' globally. This desk review explores how employment relations, and employment and working conditions may be negatively affecting the health of nurses in countries such as Brazil, Croatia, India, Ireland, Italy, México, Nepal, Spain, and the United Kingdom. MAIN BODY: Nurses' health is influenced by the broader social, economic, and political system and the redistribution of power relations that creates new policies regarding the labour market and the welfare state. The vulnerability faced by nurses is heightened by gender inequalities, in addition to social class, ethnicity/race (and caste), age and migrant status, that are inequality axes that explain why nurses' workers, and often their families, are exposed to multiple risks and/or poorer health. Before the COVID-19 pandemic, informalization of nurses' employment and working conditions were unfair and harmed their health. During COVID-19 pandemic, there is evidence that the employment and working conditions of nurses are associated to poor physical and mental health. CONCLUSION: The protection of nurses' health is paramount. International and national enforceable standards are needed, along with economic and health policies designed to substantially improve employment and working conditions for nurses and work-life balance. More knowledge is needed to understand the pathways and mechanisms on how precariousness might affect nurses' health and monitor the progress towards nurses' health equity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Employment , Health Status Disparities , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(12): 651-655, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528177

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of hand dermatitis among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic and factors affecting its prevalence. METHODS: The research sample consisted of 175 nurses working in state hospitals. Research data were collected via Google survey between September and October 2020. The data were collected using a sociodemographic data collection form, and a self-assessment form was used to determine dermatologic symptoms. RESULTS: The frequency of hand dermatitis among nurses was 70.9%. A statistically significant difference was found between sex, allergy history, and increased frequency of handwashing and the frequency of hand dermatitis. No significant difference in terms of the frequency of hand dermatitis was found between nurses who provided care to patients who were COVID-19 positive versus nurses who provided care to patients who were COVID-19 negative. However, the frequency of washing hands and using hand disinfectants and hand creams was found to have increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of hand dermatitis increased among nurses during the pandemic. The increased frequency of handwashing during the pandemic poses a risk for hand dermatitis among nurses, although this should not discourage nurses from appropriate hygiene.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis/diagnosis , Hand/physiopathology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Female , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Turkey/epidemiology
19.
BMC Med Educ ; 21(1): 585, 2021 Nov 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526627

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, the need for palliative care will increase as a result of the ageing of populations and the rising burden of cancer, non-communicable diseases as well as some communicable diseases. Physicians and registered nurses working in palliative care should have a sufficient level of education and competence in managing the changing needs and requirements of palliative care. There is, however, need for evidence-based palliative care training and education of physicians and registered nurses. The purpose of this study was to describe the views of physicians and registered nurses regarding future competence needs within palliative care. METHODS: The study was conducted through use of a cross-sectional qualitative design. A total of 54 physicians and 110 registered nurses completed an open-ended questionnaire about the future competence needs of palliative care. The data were analyzed using inductive content analysis. RESULTS: The results revealed four main competence needs within palliative care for the coming decade: palliative care competence at all levels within healthcare and social welfare services; individualized palliative care competence; person-centered encounters competence; and systematic competence development within palliative care. CONCLUSIONS: The results offer cues for education and professional development, which can be used to support physicians and registered nurses when future palliative care competences are included in educational programs. Seamless cooperation between palliative care services and educational institutions is recommended to ensure that undergraduate and postgraduate education is based on a continuous assessment of competence requirements within the field of palliative care. Therefore, online multi-professional simulations, for example, could be used to enhance future competencies within palliative care; undergraduate medical, nursing and allied healthcare students as well as postgraduate palliative care professionals and experts of experience could work together during simulations.


Subject(s)
Nurses , Physicians , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Palliative Care
20.
Rev. gaúch. enferm ; 42(spe): e20200404, 2021.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1523507

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective To reflect on the exercise of Nursing's professional autonomy in times of pandemic. Method Theoretical reflection in the light of the Sociology of Professions proposed by Eliot Freidson. Using the author's main concepts, it was sought to understand the professional practice of Nursing in times when its protagonism in the care process becomes even more challenging. Results Although there are obstacles in the daily work, it is believed that an autonomous practice contributes satisfactorily to the performance of nurses, since by revealing all the potential and leadership they have, they allow their professional autonomy to be legitimized. Final Considerations The reflection clarified the importance of nurses to put their professional autonomy into practice, in order to achieve greater recognition and social appreciation of their work in times of pandemic.


RESUMEN Objetivo Reflexionar sobre el ejercicio de la autonomía profesional de la Enfermería en tiempos de pandemia. Método Reflexión teórica a la luz de la Sociología de las Profesiones propuesta por Eliot Freidson. Utilizando los conceptos principales de la autora, buscamos comprender la práctica profesional de la Enfermería en momentos en que su protagonismo en el proceso asistencial se vuelve aún más desafiante. Resultados Si bien existen obstáculos en el trabajo diario, se cree que una práctica autónoma contribuye satisfactoriamente al desempeño de las enfermeiras y los enfermeros, ya que al revelar todo el potencial y liderazgo que tienen, permiten legitimar su autonomía profesional. Consideraciones Finales La reflexión aclaró la importancia de que el enfermero ponga en práctica su autonomía profesional, con el fin de lograr un mayor reconocimiento y valoración social de su trabajo en tiempos de pandemia.


RESUMO Objetivo Refletir sobre o exercício da autonomia profissional da Enfermagem em tempos de pandemia. Método Reflexão teórica à luz da Sociologia das Profissões proposta por Eliot Freidson. Utilizando-se os principais conceitos do autor, buscou-se uma compreensão sobre o exercício profissional da Enfermagem em tempos onde seu protagonismo frente ao processo de cuidar torna-se ainda mais desafiador. Resultados Apesar de existirem obstáculos no cotidiano de trabalho, acredita-se que uma prática autônoma contribui de forma satisfatória para o desempenho de enfermeiras(os), pois, ao revelarem todo o potencial e liderança que possuem, permitem que sua autonomia profissional seja legitimada. Considerações Finais A reflexão esclareceu a importância de enfermeiras(os) colocarem em prática sua autonomia profissional, com o intuito de alcançarem um maior reconhecimento e valorização social do seu trabalho em tempos de pandemia.


Subject(s)
Professional Practice , Professional Autonomy , Pandemics , Nurses , Sociology/education , Coronavirus Infections , Leadership , Nursing Care
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