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1.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(1)2022 Jan 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613767

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to identify the mediating effects of perceived health status (PHS) and perceived organizational support (POS) in the association between emotional labor and burnout in public health nurses (PHNs). The participants were 207 PHNs convenience sampled from 30 public health centers and offices in Jeju, Korea. Data regarding emotional labor, PHS, POS, and burnout were collected between February and March 2021 using a structured questionnaire. Collected data were analyzed by Pearson's correlation coefficient and multiple regression analysis. Burnout of PHNs was positively correlated with emotional labor (r = 0.64, p < 0.001) and negatively correlated with PHS (r = -0.51, p < 0.001) and POS (r = -0.51, p < 0.001). In the association between emotional labor and burnout, PHS (B = -1.36, p < 0.001) and POS (B = -0.42, p = 0.001) had a partial mediating effect. Reduction of burnout among PHNs requires not only effective management of emotional labor but also personal and organizational efforts to improve PHS and POS.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses, Public Health , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Health Status , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
BMJ Open ; 11(9): e048611, 2021 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1435049

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To develop a virtual reality simulation training programme, and further verify the effect of the programme on improving the response capacity of emergency reserve nurses confronting public health emergencies. DESIGN: A prospective quasiexperimental design with a control group. PARTICIPANTS: A total of 120 nurses were recruited and randomly divided into the control group and the intervention group. INTERVENTION: Participants underwent a 3-month training. The control group received the conventional training of emergency response (eg, theoretical lectures, technical skills and psychological training), while the intervention group underwent the virtual reality simulation training in combination with skills training. The COVID-19 cases were incorporated into the intervention group training, and the psychological training was identical to both groups. At the end of the training, each group conducted emergency drills twice. Before and after the intervention, the two groups were assessed for the knowledge and technical skills regarding responses to fulminate respiratory infectious diseases, as well as the capacity of emergency care. Furthermore, their pandemic preparedness was assessed with a disaster preparedness questionnaire. RESULTS: After the intervention, the scores of the relevant knowledge, the capacity of emergency care and disaster preparedness in the intervention group significantly increased (p<0.01). The score of technical skills in the control group increased more significantly than that of the intervention group (p<0.01). No significant difference was identified in the scores of postdisaster management in two groups (p>0.05). CONCLUSION: The virtual reality simulation training in combination with technical skills training can improve the response capacity of emergency reserve nurses as compared with the conventional training. The findings of the study provide some evidence for the emergency training of reserve nurses in better response to public health emergencies and suggest this methodology is worthy of further research and popularisation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses, Public Health , Simulation Training , Virtual Reality , China , Clinical Competence , Emergencies , Humans , Prospective Studies , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(6): 1019-1029, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1346002

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has highlighted differences in our engagement in health prevention behaviors. The Health Belief Model (HBM), personality traits (conscientiousness, extraversion, and neuroticism), and sociodemographic variables were used to evaluate social distancing during the first month of a state-mandated Stay At Home (SAH) order. DESIGN: A web-based convenience sample of 645 Ohioans was surveyed. Hierarchical linear regression and mediation analysis were used to examine predictors of social distancing attitudes and behaviors and whether health beliefs mediated the relationship between personality and social distancing. RESULTS: Most respondents agreed with and adhered to social distancing guidelines. HBM constructs were strong predictors of SAH attitudes, while personality accounted for little additional variance. Anxiety was indirectly related to overall social distancing attitudes and behavior through its relationship with health beliefs. However, violations of social distancing were best explained by situational factors (e.g., being an essential worker). CONCLUSION: The results demonstrate the power of components of the HBM to explain attitudes and behaviors regarding the SAH order beyond any contribution from personality. By examining the role of personality and health beliefs on social distancing attitudes and behaviors, this research will benefit public health nurses and others tasked with communicating and promoting preventative health behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Physical Distancing , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Behavior , Humans , Nurses, Public Health , Ohio/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(6): 978-983, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327590

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Although vaccination against the COVID-19 disease has recently become available, individuals are expressing fear and hesitancy towards receiving it. As a result, testing for COVID-19 is still considered a vital method to contain infection. For testing to be effective, barriers towards testing intention need to be investigated; and available literature on the challenges are scarce. This study aimed to investigate barriers of COVID-19 testing among a sample of Jordanian adults and predict testing intention within the context of these barriers. METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive, and predictive design was employed in this study among a sample of 1074 Jordanian adults. RESULTS: Three clusters of barriers predicted testing intention; perceived discrimination at work, concerns of individual's privacy, and having negative feelings towards testing. While perceived discrimination at work and privacy concerns were negatively associated with individuals' intention for testing, experiencing negative feelings towards COVID-19 testing was a positive predictor. CONCLUSION: Within the context of the study findings, public health nurses need to promote safety at the workplace, protect an individual's privacy, and eliminate negative feelings towards testing uptake through the provision of accurate and up-to-date information regarding the COVID-19 disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Testing , Health Services Accessibility , Intention , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Nurses, Public Health
5.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(5): 715-719, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211555

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has impacted routine health care services including immunization delivery. The most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States is the human papillomavirus (HPV), and its sequelae may be prevented by vaccination. Sequelae that can develop if one's immune system is not able to clear the infection include warts, precancerous lesions, and cancer. The American College of Obstetricians & Gynecologists (ACOG) reports almost everyone who is sexually active will encounter the virus at some time during their life. Most of the estimated 79 million infections occur among people who are in their late teens or early 20s. Since 2006, there has been a vaccine available to prevent HPV infections in both males and females; however, administration of this vaccine has only been about half the rate of other vaccines and vaccine hesitancy may play a role. Public health nurses are vital in providing accurate and nonjudgmental vaccine education to their clients, especially unaccompanied minors seeking care in public health department clinics. This paper will explore the recommendations for providing this vaccine as well as a snapshot of current practice in two health departments in the Southeast region of the United States during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Promotion , Papillomavirus Infections , Papillomavirus Vaccines , Adolescent , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses, Public Health , Papillomavirus Infections/epidemiology , Papillomavirus Infections/prevention & control , Papillomavirus Vaccines/administration & dosage , Public Health Administration , Southeastern United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
6.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(3): 480-481, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099730

ABSTRACT

Transitioning from bedside nursing to public health nursing after graduating with my Master's in Public Health was a unique experience, particularly as I navigated the COVID-19 pandemic as a new public health and nursing leader. Personal reflection pieces can provide a meaningful review of the experiences of integrating clinical nursing practice and more broad public health practice. The purpose of this paper is to offer my reflection and synthesis of the lessons learned while leading a Federally Qualified Health Center (FQHC) through the COVID-19 pandemic. Additionally, I reflect on the future of FQHCs and the critical need to advance public health as a field and empower public health nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses, Public Health/psychology , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Narration
7.
BMJ Open ; 11(1): e040817, 2021 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1015681

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report the results of a nurse-led pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) delivery service. DESIGN: This was a prospective cohort study conducted from 5 August 2018 to 4 March 2020. It involved manual chart review to collect data. Variables were described using frequencies and percentages and analysed using χ2 testing. Those significant in bivariate analysis were retained and entered into a binary multiple logistic regression. Hierarchical modelling was used, and only significant factors were retained. SETTING: This study occurred in an urban public health unit and community-based sexually transmitted infection (STI) clinic in Ottawa, Canada. PARTICIPANTS: Of all persons who were diagnosed with a bacterial STI in Ottawa and everyone who presented to our STI clinic during the study period, there were 347 patients who met our high-risk criteria for PrEP; these criteria included patients who newly presented with any of the following: HIV contacts, diagnosed with a bacterial STI or single use of HIV PEP. Further, eligibility could be determined based on clinical judgement. Patients who met the foregoing criteria were appropriate for PrEP-RN, while lower-risk patients were referred to elsewhere. Of the 347 patients who met our high-risk criteria, 47% accepted and 53% declined. Of those who accepted, 80% selected PrEP-registered nurse (RN). PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Uptake, acceptance, engagement and attrition factors of participants who obtained PrEP through PrEP-RN. FINDINGS: 69% of participants who were eligible attended their intake PrEP-RN visit. 66% were retained in care. Half of participants continued PrEP and half were lost to follow-up. We found no significant differences in the uptake, acceptance, engagement and attrition factors of participants who accessed PrEP-RN regarding reason for referral, age, ethnicity, sexual orientation, annual income, education attainted, insurance status, if they have a primary care provider, presence or absence of depression or anxiety and evidence of newly acquired STI during the study period. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse-led PrEP is an appropriate strategy for PrEP delivery.


Subject(s)
Anti-HIV Agents , HIV Infections , Nurses, Public Health , Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis , Anti-HIV Agents/therapeutic use , Canada , Female , HIV Infections/drug therapy , HIV Infections/prevention & control , Homosexuality, Male , Humans , Male , Nurse's Role , Prospective Studies
8.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(3): 382-389, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939808

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To determine the prevalence as well as the predictors of coronaphobia in frontline hospital and public health nurses. DESIGN: This study used a cross-sectional research study involving 736 nurses working in COVID-19 designated hospitals and health units in Region 8, Philippines. Four structured self-report scales were used, including the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, the Brief Resilience Scale, the Perceived Social Support Questionnaire, and the single-item measure for perceived health. RESULTS: The prevalence of coronaphobia was 54.76% (n = 402): 37.04% (n = 130) in hospital nurses and 70.91% (n = 273) in public health nurses. Additionally, nurses' gender (ß = 0.148, p < .001), marital status (ß = 0.124, p < .001), job status (ß = 0.138, p < .001), and personal resilience (ß = -0.167, p = .002) were identified as predictors of COVID-19 anxiety. A small proportion of nurses were willing (19.94%, n = 70) and fully prepared (9.40%, n = 33) to manage and care for coronavirus patients. CONCLUSION: Coronaphobia is prevalent among frontline Filipino nurses, particularly among public health nurses. Interventions to address coronaphobia among frontline nurses in the hospital and community should consider the predictors identified. By increasing personal resilience in nurses through theoretically driven intervention, coronaphobia may be alleviated.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Nurses, Public Health/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses, Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Philippines/epidemiology , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Am J Public Health ; 110(11): 1678-1686, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-902177

ABSTRACT

The US public health community has demonstrated increasing awareness of rural health disparities in the past several years. Although current interest is high, the topic is not new, and some of the earliest public health literature includes reports on infectious disease and sanitation in rural places. Continuing through the first third of the 20th century, dozens of articles documented rural disparities in infant and maternal mortality, sanitation and water safety, health care access, and among Black, Indigenous, and People of Color communities. Current rural research reveals similar challenges, and strategies suggested for addressing rural-urban health disparities 100 years ago resonate today. This article examines rural public health literature from a century ago and its connections to contemporary rural health disparities. We describe parallels between current and historical rural public health challenges and discuss how strategies proposed in the early 20th century may inform current policy and practice. As we explore the new frontier of rural public health, it is critical to consider enduring rural challenges and how to ensure that proposed solutions translate into actual health improvements. (Am J Public Health. 2020;110:1678-1686. https://doi.org/10.2105/AJPH.2020.305868).


Subject(s)
Public Health/history , Rural Health/history , Child Health/history , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Community Participation/history , Community Participation/methods , Health Planning/history , Health Planning/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/history , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Health Status Disparities , History, 20th Century , Humans , Maternal Health/history , Nurses, Public Health/history , Nurses, Public Health/organization & administration , Politics
10.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(2): 80-84, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-807555

ABSTRACT

The emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has highlighted the need for strong partnerships between educators and healthcare professionals to facilitate the reopening of schools. School nurses are uniquely positioned to bridge this gap because of their role as a healthcare professional in the educational setting. Past research identifies the effectiveness of collaborative efforts to serve students by community partners, school system personnel, and school nurses. However, partnerships have been episodic and reactive rather than ongoing and proactive. The circumstances of COVID-19 present an opportunity for school nurses to promote collaboration and planning as an ongoing practice. Recommendations for school nurses to form ongoing public health and school system partnerships, as well as with teachers, parents, and school nursing colleagues, are presented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/organization & administration , Public-Private Sector Partnerships/organization & administration , School Nursing/organization & administration , Students, Nursing/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Humans , Nurses, Public Health/education , Schools, Nursing/organization & administration
11.
Public Health Nurs ; 37(6): 889-894, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-793593

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) outbreak rapidly generated an unprecedented global, national, and state public health crisis with the need to rapidly develop alternate care sites (ACS) to care for COVID-19 patients within an overburdened health care system. A hospital care model ACS to increase the health care capacity, provide care for mild to moderately symptomatic patients, and offer local self-sustainment for a surge of patients was developed in Memphis, Tennessee located in Shelby County. We completed a temporary conversion of a large unused newspaper publication building to a health care facility for COVID-19 patients. Developing an ACS from ground zero was met with many challenges, and throughout the process important lessons were learned. With the goal to complete the building conversion within a 28-day timeframe, collaboration among the numerous governmental, health care, and private agencies was critical and nursing leadership was key to this process. The purpose of this paper is to describe the development of a COVID-19 ACS in Memphis, TN, which has a large at-risk population with limited access to health care. Specifically, we will discuss the strong leadership role of nursing faculty, key challenges, and lessons learned, as well as provide checklists and models for others in similar circumstances.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Health Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Leadership , Nurses, Public Health/psychology , Tennessee/epidemiology
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