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1.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(24): 7964-7970, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608921

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to develop mental health nursing strategies for the inbound quarantined population based on the results of a survey study and frontline nursing experiences. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: A mixed research method was selected, we collected data by questionnaires from 128 quarantined people, and by semi-structured interviews from 5 registered nurses. Generalized anxiety disorder-7 (GAD-7), the patient health questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI), Social Support Rating Scale (SSRS) were used in the quantitative research to identify the prevalence of psychological issues and risk factors. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in the qualitative study to conclude nursing experiences from RNs. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of anxiety, depression, and insomnia were 34%, 41%, and 18% respectively. Binary logistic regression analysis showed that social support, urban residence, and chronic disease were associated with mental health problems in certain aspects. Three themes were emerged from the analysis of RNs interviews: personality, chronic diseases, and social support. CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of mental health issues in the inbound quarantined population was the same as the general population in the initial stage of COVID-19 outbreak, and significantly lower than people who lived in high-risk areas. Living in urban areas, with chronic diseases, and obtaining less social support are the risk factors. Finally, four nursing strategies were proposed by the research team for mental health well-being.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/organization & administration , Psychiatric Nursing/organization & administration , Quarantine/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Prevalence , Professional Role , Quarantine/standards , Risk Factors , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/prevention & control , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Social Support/psychology , Social Support/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
2.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258224, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, low personal accomplishment and depersonalization experienced by a health professional and it is more common in nurses due to high workload and job stress that is mostly caused by working proximity to patients and taking care of them. Burnout compromises the provision of quality health care. Despite this, there is no information in Ethiopia on burnout among nurses in study area. OBJECTIVES: To determine the magnitude of burnout and associated factors among nurses working in public hospitals of Harari regional state and Dire Dawa administration, eastern Ethiopia, February 1-29, 2020. METHODS: Institutional based quantitative cross-sectional study was employed from February 1-29 among 412 randomly selected nurses who have been working in hospitals for the last 6 months. Simple random sampling method was employed and data was collected by self-administered, standardized, reliable and valid, questionnaire (Maslachs Burnout Inventory- Human Services Survey). Data was entered into EpiData Version 3.1 and exported to statistical package for social science version 20 for analysis. All covariate with P-value less than 0.25 in bivariable analysis were candidate for multivariable analysis. Level of statistical significance was declared at p-value < 0.05. RESULTS: Among 412 nurses taking part in this study, 183(44.4%) of nurses with 95% CI, had experienced burnout. Married marital status [AOR:2.3,95%CI:(1.2-4.3)], poor current health status [AOR:4.8, 95% CI:(1.1-21.4)] and fair current health status [AOR:12, 95% CI:(4.5-32)], working greater than eight hour per-day[AOR:0.52, 95%CI:(0.29-0.92)], intention to leave a job [AOR:0.48,95%CI:(0.2-0.88), being working in emergency room [AOR:0.3,95%CI:(0.1-0.98)] and using a different medication related to work related health problems were factors associated with nurses' burnout. CONCLUSION: The nurses' burnout in this study is high and it is attributed by marriage, perceiving health status as poor and fair, whereas, having the intention to leave job, being working in emergency room and using a medication in relation to work related health problems reduced risk of developing burnout. So, the concerned bodies should provide trainings which focus on stress copying mechanisms and assertiveness program.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Hospitals, Public , Nurses/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/psychology , Young Adult
4.
J Correct Health Care ; 27(2): 89-102, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262061

ABSTRACT

During a pandemic, basic public health precautions must be taken across settings and populations. However, confinement conditions change what can be done in correctional settings. Correctional nursing (CN) care, like all nursing care, needs to be named and encoded to be recognized and used to generate data that will advance the discipline and maintain standards of care. The Omaha System is a standardized interprofessional terminology that has been used since 1992 to guide and document care. In 2019, a collaboration between the newly formed American Correctional Nurses Association and the Omaha System Community of Practice began a joint effort with other stakeholders aimed at encoding evidence-based pandemic response interventions used in CN. The resulting guidelines are included and illustrated with examples from CN practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Correctional Facilities/standards , Documentation/standards , Nurses/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Nurses/organization & administration , Nursing Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
5.
Prof Inferm ; 74(1): 41-47, 2021.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259732

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The Coronavirus (Covid-19) pandemic caused a severe health crisis that has affected millions of people and quarantined half of the world's population. The health emergency from Covid-19 has seen health workers on the front line face all the difficulties related to the burden of care and the reorganization of procedures, roles, and tools at the hospital level. One of the most significant and probably underestimated aspects is the psychological stress of frontline nurses. The article aims to analyze the literature relating to the impact on the mental health of nurses engaged in the management and care of Covid-19 patients. METHODS: A systematic review of the published articles on the subject was conducted from January 2020 to November 2020. The search for papers was conducted on scientific databases like PubMed, Scopus and Embase. RESULTS: The results show the onset of anxiety, depression and stress and insomnia in healthcare workers. These aspects are closely related to numerous factors, including the fear of contracting the disease and infecting family members, stressful shifts and little rest, leading to a state of psychological and physical tension capable of activating pathological behaviours. The literature highlights the importance of support interventions for frontline personnel to avoid the onset of psycho-pathophysical severe problems. CONCLUSION: The review suggests that frontline nurses during the emergency phase of Covid- 19 may be prone to psychological disorders that can compromise mental health. Therefore, the surveillance and monitoring of symptoms, together with targeted support interventions, should be guaranteed daily to all professionals involved to prevent the onset of psychological disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Mental Health , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology
6.
Prof Inferm ; 74(1): 31-40, 2021.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259731

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Media play a key part in shaping nurses' social perception. Newspapers were chosen as the subject of this content analysis, as they are the main resource that Italians use to inform themselves. For this reason, ne wspapers are an appropriate resource to analyse the image of the nurse that, as found in literature, is seen as a dynamic phenomenon that changes according to different scenarios. Given the media focus on nurses during COVID- 19 it seems reasonable to analyse what nurse image was emerged. METHOD: A Content Analysis with an inductive process was conducted. The analysis' objective was to evaluate the image of the nurse in national and local newspapers, published between the 30th of January and the 18th of May 2020. A triangulation methodology was used between the two researchers to ensure data quality. R ESULTS: Five themes were identified. The risks for the nurse's psycho-physic wellbeing. Taking responsibility and human relations despite barriers. The acknowledgment of professional attributes. Uncertainty on the continuity of the nurses' social role emerged from the media. Nurses only wish to be appreciated for what they do. The agreement between the researchers on the themes has a Krippendor ff 's alpha between =0.713 and =0.985. CONCLUSIONS: The media's interest highlighted the nurses' competence in assisting patients with COVID-19. However, there isn't in-depth analysis, of the contemporar y image of the nurse, specifically in relation to leadership. Positive and negative tropes are recalled. The superficiality and fragility of the mediatic phenomena emerged, as opposed to a real positive strengthening of the nurse's social perception.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Newspapers as Topic , Nurses/psychology , Public Opinion , Humans , Italy , Leadership , Nurse's Role , Nurses/organization & administration , Social Perception
7.
Prof Inferm ; 73(3): 133-140, 2020.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000572

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: In February 2020 the first case of COVID-19 arrived in Canton Ticino. Since then, many things have changed at great speed, especially in health organizations, and these changes have had a strong impact on the nursing profession. The objective of this research was: to investigate the experiences of nurses at different organizational levels who were confronted with the COVID pandemic in the first month in which it occurred. METHODS: Narrative Research. The data collection was carried out involving a group of 20 nurses working in different contexts and roles in Canton Ticino. The collected narrations were analyzed through a thematic analysis of their content using Nvivo 12®. RESULTS: The thematic analysis of the narrations made it possible to define 26 themes and 6 macro-themes: Pandemic, What changes, Communication, Emotions/experiences, Role and image, Interprofessional collaboration. The results of this research make it possible to understand how a heterogeneous group of nurses experienced the particular period of pandemic in Canton Ticino and which reflections were derived from it. Some of the aspects highlighted can be compared with what is present in the international literature on the subject in order to find common ways of action for the nursing leadership, in the different Countries, facing the need to organize, manage and support nursing professionals in this and future pandemic situations. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this research can be used both at an organisational and educational level and can be the starting point for future research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse's Role , Nurses/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Interdisciplinary Communication , Leadership , Switzerland
8.
Prof Inferm ; 73(3): 129-130, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1000570

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has exposed the vulnerabilities of nursing supply flows, domestically and internationally. Its impact at the country-level has further highlighted preexisting nurse supply gaps and the effect of staffing shortages. Internationally, the pandemic has disrupted global supply chains. The world has witnessed the closing of borders, the interruption of travel, and, in some countries, the restriction of outflows. The State of the World's Nursing Report (SOWN) (WHO, 2020) noted a shortfall of almost six million nurses immediately pre-COVID-19, a shortage suffered particularly by low- and middle-income countries. This is of major concern given that increased international outflows of nurses in the new post-COVID era could undermine, even more than before, the readiness of those countries to meet healthcare demands (ICN, 2020). In this default scenario, some, but not all, highincome destination countries will continue to rely on international inflow of nurses to a significant extent, as they did pre-COVID- 19, further exacerbating the suffering of poor countries. Put simply, without country-level policy changes related to the nursing workforce and backed by international organisations, pre-COVID-19 trends of increased nurse flows from low- to high-income countries will likely continue. In this scenario, the iniquitous maldistribution of nurses may become more pronounced. This "do nothing" option risks undermining both country-level progress towards the attainment of Universal Health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Emigration and Immigration/trends , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Nurses/supply & distribution , COVID-19/epidemiology , Developed Countries , Developing Countries , Health Policy , Humans , Internationality , Nurses/organization & administration , Nursing Staff/supply & distribution
9.
Invest Educ Enferm ; 38(3)2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-972571

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Report on communication and qualified listening in nursing work in the face of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This descriptive, theoretical and reflexive report was developed by nurses between March 20th and May 25th 2020 at Emergency Care Services in the city of Fortaleza, Ceará, Brazil. Health communication served as the theoretical background for this research. RESULTS: Two main thematic categories were highlighted: (i) Resignifications of communication in the work relationships of the health team and (ii) Guided listening to users by nurses at the Emergency Care Services during the pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: The experience revealed an excerpt of what is found under the conditions of the current situation resulting from COVID-19. Communication turned into an essential tool to maintain professional relationships and culminate in collaboration and cooperation of the team in order to provide a close relationship with the user and promote the quality of health care processes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Nurses/organization & administration , Brazil , Cooperative Behavior , Delivery of Health Care/standards , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , Nursing/organization & administration , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Quality of Health Care
13.
J Nurs Manag ; 28(7): 1653-1661, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740254

ABSTRACT

AIM: This study examines the relative influence of personal resilience, social support and organisational support in reducing COVID-19 anxiety in front-line nurses. BACKGROUND: Anxiety related to the COVID-19 pandemic is prevalent in the nursing workforce, potentially affecting nurses' well-being and work performance. Identifying factors that could help maintain mental health and reduce coronavirus-related anxiety among front-line nurses is imperative. Currently, no studies have been conducted examining the influence of personal resilience, social support and organisational support in reducing COVID-19 anxiety among nurses. METHODS: This cross-sectional study involved 325 registered nurses from the Philippines using four standardized scales. RESULTS: Of the 325 nurses in the study, 123 (37.8%) were found to have dysfunctional levels of anxiety. Using multiple linear regression analyses, social support (ß = -0.142, p = .011), personal resilience (ß = -0.151, p = .008) and organisational support (ß = -0.127, p = .023) predicted COVID-19 anxiety. Nurse characteristics were not associated with COVID-19 anxiety. CONCLUSIONS: Resilient nurses and those who perceived higher organisational and social support were more likely to report lower anxiety related to COVID-19. IMPLICATION FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: COVID-19 anxiety may be addressed through organisational interventions, including increasing social support, assuring adequate organisational support, providing psychological and mental support services and providing resilience-promoting and stress management interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Resilience, Psychological , Social Support , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Philippines/epidemiology
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