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1.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 22-30, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612687

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of the perceptions and experiences of nurses caring for patients and families under the COVID-19 pandemic's socially restrictive practices and policies. BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 global pandemic has affected the delivery of health care to patients and their families, with many aspects altered because of the need for social distancing, social isolation, and visitation restriction policies. These policies have created communication challenges for interdisciplinary health care teams, patients, and families. As frontline caregivers, nurses have felt strongly the impact of these challenges. METHODS: A qualitative descriptive study was conducted among 17 RNs who were caring for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and were recruited via social media posts on Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn. Watson's theory of human caring served as the conceptual framework for the study. RESULTS: Several themes emerged regarding nurses' experiences of communication with patients and families. These include communication challenges and barriers, prioritization, integration of group communication, nurse self-reflection, and acceptance of gratitude. CONCLUSIONS: The study findings underscore the importance of nurses' communication with patients and families under the pandemic's restricted conditions. They demonstrate the value of nurses' ability to innovate in fostering all parties' participation in the plan of care, and highlight the comfort nurses provide to patients who are isolated from loved ones. Strategies that fostered communication were identified, as were areas for further research.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Empathy , Nurses/psychology , Professional-Family Relations , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Interviews as Topic/methods , Nurses/trends , Qualitative Research
2.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 537-540, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598846

ABSTRACT

Nurses and nurse leaders are working in unprecedented intense and demanding environments, and the COVID-19 pandemic continues to place strain on their mental well-being. If stressful work conditions remain at extraordinary high levels, nurses and leaders may ultimately leave their positions, creating even more uncertainty in the workforce. Enhancing individual resilience has become a superficial response in retaining nurses during a global nursing shortage. We argue that resilience is not solely an individual responsibility. Rather, resilience it is a mutual responsibility between the individual and the organization. In this article, we discuss how nurse leaders can foster organizational resilience while also enhancing their own individual resilience within the current pandemic environment, and as we transition to a post-COVID environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Nurse Administrators , Nurses/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Global Health , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Mental Health , Nurse Administrators/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/psychology
3.
Nursing ; 51(7): 52-56, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561264

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Little is known about the psychological impact of trauma from pandemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores a descriptive study on the impact of COVID-19 and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder among RNs caring for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Self Report
4.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 49-53, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522340

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses are trusted to be truthful and to provide considered, substantiated information in a neutral way. Yet the COVID-19 crisis has highlighted how some nurses engage in misinformation on social media and in other venues. This article explores the reasons why people believe they are fully informed, including the possible influence of confirmation biases. It also describes the augmented ethical responsibilities of nurses to examine in depth what they think they know and understand and to account for cognitive biases. Strategies for nurse leaders, managers, and educators are provided to facilitate good practice and help ensure nurses are held accountable for their actions and social media postings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communication , Nurses/psychology , Social Media , Humans
5.
Am J Nurs ; 121(12): 18-28, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1506930

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: For nurses, the challenges posed by demanding work environments and schedules often lead to fatigue, and this can be exacerbated during crises like the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article, the authors discuss causes and challenges of nurse fatigue and consider several evidence-based strategies and solutions for individual nurses and organizations. Barriers to implementation, including a negative workplace culture and inadequate staffing, are also described, and several resources are presented.


Subject(s)
Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/prevention & control , Nurses/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workplace/organization & administration , Workplace/psychology
8.
PLoS One ; 16(10): e0258224, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496506

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a syndrome of emotional exhaustion, low personal accomplishment and depersonalization experienced by a health professional and it is more common in nurses due to high workload and job stress that is mostly caused by working proximity to patients and taking care of them. Burnout compromises the provision of quality health care. Despite this, there is no information in Ethiopia on burnout among nurses in study area. OBJECTIVES: To determine the magnitude of burnout and associated factors among nurses working in public hospitals of Harari regional state and Dire Dawa administration, eastern Ethiopia, February 1-29, 2020. METHODS: Institutional based quantitative cross-sectional study was employed from February 1-29 among 412 randomly selected nurses who have been working in hospitals for the last 6 months. Simple random sampling method was employed and data was collected by self-administered, standardized, reliable and valid, questionnaire (Maslachs Burnout Inventory- Human Services Survey). Data was entered into EpiData Version 3.1 and exported to statistical package for social science version 20 for analysis. All covariate with P-value less than 0.25 in bivariable analysis were candidate for multivariable analysis. Level of statistical significance was declared at p-value < 0.05. RESULTS: Among 412 nurses taking part in this study, 183(44.4%) of nurses with 95% CI, had experienced burnout. Married marital status [AOR:2.3,95%CI:(1.2-4.3)], poor current health status [AOR:4.8, 95% CI:(1.1-21.4)] and fair current health status [AOR:12, 95% CI:(4.5-32)], working greater than eight hour per-day[AOR:0.52, 95%CI:(0.29-0.92)], intention to leave a job [AOR:0.48,95%CI:(0.2-0.88), being working in emergency room [AOR:0.3,95%CI:(0.1-0.98)] and using a different medication related to work related health problems were factors associated with nurses' burnout. CONCLUSION: The nurses' burnout in this study is high and it is attributed by marriage, perceiving health status as poor and fair, whereas, having the intention to leave job, being working in emergency room and using a medication in relation to work related health problems reduced risk of developing burnout. So, the concerned bodies should provide trainings which focus on stress copying mechanisms and assertiveness program.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , Hospitals, Public , Nurses/psychology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ethiopia , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/psychology , Young Adult
9.
Nurs Stand ; 36(11): 61-65, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1481194

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has led to a significant increase in the demand for palliative and end of life care, particularly in the community. Furthermore, palliative and end of life care services face growing pressures due to the increasing number of older people and increasing prevalence of chronic illness. Palliative and end of life care cannot be provided solely by specialists but needs to be integrated into mainstream healthcare. All nurses have a role in supporting patients with life-limiting conditions, and their families, by providing what is termed 'generalist palliative care'. However, some nurses may feel unprepared, unsupported or lacking the confidence and skills for that role. This article explores the definitions of palliative and end of life care, as well as the changes and challenges in service provision brought about by the COVID-19 pandemic. It also considers how nurses who have not specialised in this area of practice can be supported to care effectively for patients with life-limiting conditions, and their families, notably through workforce development initiatives such as training programmes and clinical supervision. This could not only increase the skills of the nursing workforce but also improve patient care.


Subject(s)
Community Health Nursing/organization & administration , Nurse's Role , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff/education , Palliative Care/methods , Aged , COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Hospice Care , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Terminal Care
12.
Aust J Rural Health ; 29(5): 753-767, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1443220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact of COVID-19 on the mental health and well-being of rural paramedics, police, community nursing and child protection staff. METHOD: An online survey was distributed to investigate the sources of stress and support across individual, task and organisational domains. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The survey was completed by 1542 paramedics, police, community nurses and child protection workers from all states and territories of Australia. This study describes the data for the 632 rural participants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The main measures of well-being were the Public Health Questionnaire (PHQ9), the Generalised Anxiety Disorder (GAD7), the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), workplace engagement, intention to quit and COVID-19-related stress. RESULTS: The mean depression and anxiety scores were 8.2 (PHQ9) and 6.8 (GAD7). This is 2-3 times that found in the general community. Over half (56.1%) of respondents showed high emotional exhaustion (burnout). The emotional exhaustion, depersonalisation and personal accomplishment mean scores were 28.5, 9.3 and 34.2, respectively. The strongest associations with burnout and psychological distress were workload, provision of practical support, training and organisational communication. A significant proportion of respondents were seriously considering quitting (27.4%) or looking for a new job with a different employer (28.5%) in the next 12 months. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has increased the workload and stress on rural front-line community staff. The major sources of stress were related to organisations' responses to COVID-19 and not COVID-19 per se. The data suggest the most effective mental health interventions are practical and preventive, such as firstly ensuring fair and reasonable workloads.


Subject(s)
Allied Health Personnel/psychology , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Police/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
13.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(10): 488-494, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406515

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the relationships between perceptions of the pandemic impact on clinical nurses' and nurse leaders' intent to leave their current position and the profession and the differences in pandemic impact and intent to leave variables based on background factors. BACKGROUND: There is much discussion and concern about the COVID-19 pandemic impact on nurses' health and the nursing workforce. METHODS: More than 5000 nurses from a national sample participated in a cross-sectional, descriptive study. Participants rated their perceptions of the pandemic impact on their practice and their intent to leave their position and profession. RESULTS: Pandemic impact was rated high overall and was highest in nurses with 25+ years of experience and in managers/directors. Eleven percent of the total sample indicated they intended to leave their position, and 20% were undecided. Nurses who rated pandemic impact at the highest level had higher intent to leave their position. Of the respondents, less than 2% indicated they were leaving the nursing profession, whereas 8% were undecided. CONCLUSIONS: This is the 1st quantitative report of perceived level of pandemic impact on direct care nurses and nurse managers/directors at the time of this writing. The combination of those who intend to leave and those who are uncertain about leaving their positions could cause instability in the workforce if not reversed. Organizational attention to nurse well-being, work environment and staffing is imperative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intention , Nurses/psychology , Personnel Turnover , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Workplace , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Report , United States
14.
J Korean Acad Nurs ; 51(4): 442-453, 2021 Aug.
Article in Korean | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403931

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This study was conducted to assess public awareness and policy challenges faced by practicing nurses. METHODS: After collecting nurse-related news articles published before and after 'the Thanks to You Challenge' campaign (between December 31, 2019, and July 15, 2020), keywords were extracted via preprocessing. A three-step method keyword analysis, latent Dirichlet allocation topic modeling, and keyword network analysis was used to examine the text and the structure of the selected news articles. RESULTS: Top 30 keywords with similar occurrences were collected before and after the campaign. The five dominant topics before the campaign were: pandemic, infection of medical staff, local transmission, medical resources, and return of overseas Koreans. After the campaign, the topics 'infection of medical staff' and 'return of overseas Koreans' disappeared, but 'the Thanks to You Challenge' emerged as a dominant topic. A keyword network analysis revealed that the word of nurse was linked with keywords like thanks and campaign, through the word of sacrifice. These words formed interrelated domains of 'the Thanks to You Challenge' topic. CONCLUSION: The findings of this study can provide useful information for understanding various issues and social perspectives on COVID-19 nursing. The major themes of news reports lagged behind the real problems faced by nurses in COVID-19 crisis. While the press tends to focus on heroism and whole society, issues and policies mutually beneficial to public and nursing need to be further explored and enhanced by nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Newspapers as Topic/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/psychology , Social Network Analysis , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Nursing ; 51(9): 40-43, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1393340

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The US healthcare system is plagued with inequities that disproportionately impact people of color and other marginalized communities. This article discusses some of the key reasons behind these historic and current health disparities, identifies key terms, and discusses strategies for nurses who are interested in allying with efforts to tackle inequity and racism in American healthcare.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Healthcare Disparities/ethnology , Nurses/psychology , Racism/prevention & control , COVID-19/ethnology , Health Status Disparities , Humans , United States/epidemiology
17.
J Obstet Gynecol Neonatal Nurs ; 50(6): 742-752, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392426

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To examine the roles and experiences of labor and delivery (LD) nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional survey. SETTING: Online distribution between the beginning of July and end of August 2020. PARTICIPANTS: LD nurses (N = 757) responded to an open-ended question about changes to their roles during the COVID-19 pandemic as part of a larger national survey. METHODS: We calculated descriptive statistics on respondents' characteristics and their hospitals' characteristics. We applied conventional content analysis to free-text comments. RESULTS: We derived four major categories from the responses: Changes in Roles and Responsibilities, Adaptations to Changes, Psychological Changes, and Perceived Effects on LaborSupport. Nearly half (n = 328) of respondents reported changes in their roles and responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. They described adaptations and responses to these changes and perceived effects on patient care. Infection control policies and practices as well as the stress of a rapidly changing work environment affected the provision of labor support and personal well-being. CONCLUSION: The experiences described by respondents conveyed considerable changes in their roles and subsequent direct and indirect effects on quality of patient care and personal well-being. Policies and practices that can facilitate the ability of LD nurses to safely and securely remain at the bedside and provide high-touch, hands-on labor support are needed. The findings of our study can help facilitate the provision of labor support during times of disruption and foster the resiliency of the nursing workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Delivery, Obstetric/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Pregnant Women/psychology , Prenatal Care/psychology , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Delivery, Obstetric/psychology , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
18.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257064, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394555

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought significant pressure on nurses globally as they are the frontline of care. This study aimed to explore the experiences and challenges of nurses who worked with hospitalised patients with COVID-19. In this qualitative study, a purposive sample of 14 nurses participated in in-depth telephone interviews. Data were analysed using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Five key themes emerged: (1) physical and psychological distress of nurses, (2) willingness to work, (3) the essential role of support mechanisms, (4) educational and informational needs of nurses and (5) the role of modern technology in COVID-19 care. Although the provision of care led to physical and psychological distress among nurses, with their commitment and professional obligation, it is a new experience that leads to personal satisfaction. Guilty feeling related to inefficiency of care, witnessing the suffering of patients, discomfort associated with wearing personal protective equipment (PPE), work-related issues (e.g., long hour shifts), negative impact to the family and rejection by others are the leading distress factors. Religious beliefs, including keeping trust in good and bad merits, have become a strong coping mechanism. Addressing distress among nurses is essential. The reported learning needs of nurses included skills related to donning and doffing PPE, skills in performing nursing procedures and breaking bad news. Nurse managers need to pay special attention to expanding training opportunities as well as support mechanisms, for example, welfare, appreciations and counselling services for nurses. Modern technology, particularly robots and telecommunication, can perform an essential role in COVID-19 care. The establishment of timely policies and strategies to protect health workers during a national disaster like COVID-19 is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Psychological Distress , Psychology, Clinical , Robotics/standards , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Telecommunications
19.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(5): 781-788, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To measure COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and related factors to undercover nurses' concerns and fears. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SAMPLE: The study included 639 nurses; 83% were women and 80% under 50 years. MEASUREMENT: A self-administered questionnaire was used. It included demographic characteristics, COVID-19-related fears and concerns, COVID-19 vaccine perceived benefits, and intention toward getting the vaccine. RESULTS: Forty percent of the nurses planned to get the vaccine when available, 41% would take it later when adequate protection and safety were presented, and 18% would never take it. Significant factors associated with vaccination intention were as follows: age (adjusted OR 1.42, 95% CI: 1.02-1.99); lack of knowledge about the vaccine (adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.81-3.8); concern about long-term side effects (adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-2.9); fear of injection (adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.04-2.13); natural immunity preference (adjusted OR 5.8, 95% CI 4.5-8.3); media misrepresentation (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4); and getting COVID-19 from the vaccine (adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 vaccine safety and side-effects concerns impact nurses' intentions to accept the vaccine and may result in low acceptance rates. Urgent action is needed to address these fears and raise confidence, as nurses' vaccine-related decisions can affect the public's vaccine acceptance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Intention , Nurses , Vaccination , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
20.
Nurs Womens Health ; 24(5): 309-310, 2020 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1386402

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic may have many of us feeling distraught, but there are still reasons to be hopeful about the future of health care.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Delivery of Health Care/organization & administration , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Forecasting , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology
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