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1.
Brain Behav Immun ; 87: 11-17, 2020 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719332

ABSTRACT

The severe 2019 outbreak of novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), which was first reported in Wuhan, would be expected to impact the mental health of local medical and nursing staff and thus lead them to seek help. However, those outcomes have yet to be established using epidemiological data. To explore the mental health status of medical and nursing staff and the efficacy, or lack thereof, of critically connecting psychological needs to receiving psychological care, we conducted a quantitative study. This is the first paper on the mental health of medical and nursing staff in Wuhan. Notably, among 994 medical and nursing staff working in Wuhan, 36.9% had subthreshold mental health disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 2.4), 34.4% had mild disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 5.4), 22.4% had moderate disturbances (mean PHQ-9: 9.0), and 6.2% had severe disturbance (mean PHQ-9: 15.1) in the immediate wake of the viral epidemic. The noted burden fell particularly heavily on young women. Of all participants, 36.3% had accessed psychological materials (such as books on mental health), 50.4% had accessed psychological resources available through media (such as online push messages on mental health self-help coping methods), and 17.5% had participated in counseling or psychotherapy. Trends in levels of psychological distress and factors such as exposure to infected people and psychological assistance were identified. Although staff accessed limited mental healthcare services, distressed staff nonetheless saw these services as important resources to alleviate acute mental health disturbances and improve their physical health perceptions. These findings emphasize the importance of being prepared to support frontline workers through mental health interventions at times of widespread crisis.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Mental Health Services , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Patient Health Questionnaire , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
PLoS One ; 17(2): e0263502, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1706351

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, nurses stand in an unknown situation while facing continuous news feeds. Social media is a ubiquitous tool to gain and share reliable knowledge and experiences regarding COVID-19. The article aims to explore how nurses use social media in relation to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHOD: A scoping review inspired by Arksey and O'Mally was conducted by searches in Medline, CINAHL, Academic Search Complete and Web of Sciences. Empirical research studies investigating nurses' use of social media in relation to COVID-19 were included. Exclusion criteria were: Literature reviews, articles in languages other than English, articles about E-health, and articles investigating healthcare professionals without specification of nurses included. Articles, published in January-November 2020, were included and analysed through a thematic analysis. The PRISMA-ScR checklist was used. RESULTS: Most of the eleven included studies were cross-sectional surveys, conducted in developing countries, and had neither social media nor nurses as their main focus of interest. Three themes were identified: 'Social media as a knowledge node', 'Social media functioned as profession-promoting channels' and 'Social media as a disciplinary tool'. Nurses used social media as channels to gain and share information about COVID-19, and to support each other by highlighting the need for training and changes in delivery of care and redeployment. Further, social media functioned as profession-promoting channels partly sharing heroic self-representations and acknowledgment of frontline persons in the pandemic, partly by displaying critical working conditions. Finally, nurses used social media to educate people to perform the 'right 'COVID-19' behaviours in society. CONCLUSION: This review provided snapshots of nurses' uses of social media from various regions in the world, but revealed a need for studies from further countries and continents. The study calls for further multi-methodological and in depth qualitative research, including theoretically framed studies, with a specific focus on the uses of social media among nurses during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Social Support/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Information Dissemination , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Professional Role/psychology , Social Support/psychology
4.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0247794, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575402

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identified in December 2019 in the city of Wuhan, China, the outbreak of COVID-19 spread throughout the world and its impacts affect different populations differently, where countries with high levels of social and economic inequality such as Brazil gain prominence, for understanding of the vulnerability factors associated with the disease. Given this scenario, in the absence of a vaccine or safe and effective antiviral treatment for COVID-19, nonpharmacological measures are essential for prevention and control of the disease. However, many of these measures are not feasible for millions of individuals who live in territories with increased social vulnerability. The study aims to analyze the spatial distribution of COVID-19 incidence in Brazil's municipalities (counties) and investigate its association with sociodemographic determinants to better understand the social context and the epidemic's spread in the country. METHODS: This is an analytical ecological study using data from various sources. The study period was February 25 to September 26, 2020. Data analysis used global regression models: ordinary least squares (OLS), spatial autoregressive model (SAR), and conditional autoregressive model (CAR) and the local regression model called multiscale geographically weighted regression (MGWR). FINDINGS: The higher the GINI index, the higher the incidence of the disease at the municipal level. Likewise, the higher the nurse ratio per 1,000 inhabitants in the municipalities, the higher the COVID-19 incidence. Meanwhile, the proportional mortality ratio was inversely associated with incidence of the disease. DISCUSSION: Social inequality increased the risk of COVID-19 in the municipalities. Better social development of the municipalities was associated with lower risk of the disease. Greater access to health services improved the diagnosis and notification of the disease and was associated with more cases in the municipalities. Despite universal susceptibility to COVID-19, populations with increased social vulnerability were more exposed to risk of the illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Brazil/epidemiology , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/mortality , Cities/epidemiology , Demography , Female , Humans , Incidence , Male , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Spatial Analysis , Spatial Regression
5.
Nursing ; 51(7): 52-56, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561264

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Little is known about the psychological impact of trauma from pandemics such as the COVID-19 pandemic. This article explores a descriptive study on the impact of COVID-19 and the prevalence of posttraumatic stress disorder among RNs caring for patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Self Report
6.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(12): 651-655, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528177

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of hand dermatitis among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic and factors affecting its prevalence. METHODS: The research sample consisted of 175 nurses working in state hospitals. Research data were collected via Google survey between September and October 2020. The data were collected using a sociodemographic data collection form, and a self-assessment form was used to determine dermatologic symptoms. RESULTS: The frequency of hand dermatitis among nurses was 70.9%. A statistically significant difference was found between sex, allergy history, and increased frequency of handwashing and the frequency of hand dermatitis. No significant difference in terms of the frequency of hand dermatitis was found between nurses who provided care to patients who were COVID-19 positive versus nurses who provided care to patients who were COVID-19 negative. However, the frequency of washing hands and using hand disinfectants and hand creams was found to have increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of hand dermatitis increased among nurses during the pandemic. The increased frequency of handwashing during the pandemic poses a risk for hand dermatitis among nurses, although this should not discourage nurses from appropriate hygiene.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis/diagnosis , Hand/physiopathology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Female , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Turkey/epidemiology
8.
Am J Nurs ; 121(10): 14, 2021 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434514
9.
Public Health Nurs ; 38(5): 781-788, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394000

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To measure COVID-19 vaccine acceptance and related factors to undercover nurses' concerns and fears. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SAMPLE: The study included 639 nurses; 83% were women and 80% under 50 years. MEASUREMENT: A self-administered questionnaire was used. It included demographic characteristics, COVID-19-related fears and concerns, COVID-19 vaccine perceived benefits, and intention toward getting the vaccine. RESULTS: Forty percent of the nurses planned to get the vaccine when available, 41% would take it later when adequate protection and safety were presented, and 18% would never take it. Significant factors associated with vaccination intention were as follows: age (adjusted OR 1.42, 95% CI: 1.02-1.99); lack of knowledge about the vaccine (adjusted OR 2.6, 95% CI 1.81-3.8); concern about long-term side effects (adjusted OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4-2.9); fear of injection (adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.04-2.13); natural immunity preference (adjusted OR 5.8, 95% CI 4.5-8.3); media misrepresentation (adjusted OR 1.7, 95% CI 1.2-2.4); and getting COVID-19 from the vaccine (adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.1-2.1). CONCLUSION: COVID-19 vaccine safety and side-effects concerns impact nurses' intentions to accept the vaccine and may result in low acceptance rates. Urgent action is needed to address these fears and raise confidence, as nurses' vaccine-related decisions can affect the public's vaccine acceptance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines , COVID-19 , Intention , Nurses , Vaccination , Adult , Age Factors , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination/psychology , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data
10.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 79, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1369873

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The mental health of people working in Covid-19 wards (nurses, doctors, etc.) may be compromised due to the specific conditions of the workplace and patients. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between mental burden and quality of work life in nurses in intensive care units of Covid-19 patients. Method: In this cross-sectional study, a sample of 200 people-100 nurses in care units for patients with COVID-19 (group 1) and 100 nurses in non-COVID-19 patient care units (group 2-in three university hospitals were obtained. These 200 samples were randomly extracted from the list of employees and selected. Data were collected using three questionnaires, including (1) a demographic, (2) the NASA-Task Load Index (1988) (Hart & Staveland, 1988) and (3) National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) Quality of Life. Data were analyzed using SPSS-24 software and descriptive and analytical statistical methods. Results: The overall mean scores of nurses' quality of work life were significantly different between the two groups (P < 0.05). The average score of quality of life in nurses caring for patients with COVID-19 is 92.57, more than nurses caring for patients without COVID-19, 79.43. Among the dimensions of mental workload: Performance and efficiency, with an average score of 77.32 ± 15.85, had the highest score, while discouragement and failure, with an average score of 58.04 ± 26.72, had the lowest score of mental workload. There is a significant difference between the mental load of work in the two groups (P = 0.001). There is a significant inverse relationship between total quality of work life and total mental workload (r = -14 and P = 0.01). Conclusion: In this study, it was observed that nurses caring for Covid-19 patients are in a more unfavorable situation in terms of the studied characteristics. Due to the work period, these nurses have a high workload and a low quality of work life to compensate for the mental and physical deficiencies required by a long presence in the work environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Quality of Life , Workload , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload/psychology
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(31): e26828, 2021 Aug 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1354341

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The purpose of this study was to investigate the association between mental health (posttraumatic stress disorder, depression, anxiety disorder, and burnout) and intention to resign, and influencing factors regarding nurses involved with COVID-19 patients in A Prefecture as subjects.The design is a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study.Methods are conducted between August 4 and October 26, 2020. Basic attributes (gender, age, years of experience, etc.) were examined. Patient Health Questionnaire-9 and the Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7, Impact of Event Scale-Revised, Maslach Burnout Inventory, "intent to resign," were used to collect data from nurses working at hospitals treating patients with COVID-19 in Japan.As a result, between 20% and 30% of nurses involved with patients with COVID-19 are in a state of high mental distress. Regarding the associations between psychiatric symptoms and intention to resign, "I want to quit being a nurse" was affected by "cynicism" and "professional efficacy"; "I want to change hospitals/wards" was affected by "cynicism"; and "subthreshold depression," "anxiety disorder," and "burnout" affected "I want to continue working as a nurse." The increase in the number of patients with COVID-19 was a factor affecting mental health and intention to resign. When the number of patients increased, anxiety disorders and intention to resign also increased. Damage from harmful rumors increased the severity of every psychiatric symptom. To prepare for a pandemic such as COVID-19, it is necessary in normal times to construct psychological support systems and community systems to prevent damage from harmful rumors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Intention , Nurses/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan , Job Satisfaction , Male , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Patient Health Questionnaire , Psychiatric Nursing/methods , Psychiatric Nursing/standards , Psychiatric Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Am J Nurs ; 121(7): 15, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348064
13.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0255350, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1329137

ABSTRACT

The aims of this study are to evaluate and describe mental health workforce and capacity, and to describe the relationship between workforce capacity and patterns of care in local areas. We conducted a comparative demonstration study of the applicability of an internationally validated standardised service classification instrument-the Description and Evaluation of Services and Directories-DESDE-LTC) using the emerging mental health ecosystems research (MHESR) approach. Using DESDE-LTC as the framework, and drawing from international occupation classifications, the workforce was classified according to characteristics including the type of care provided and professional background. Our reference area was the Australian Capital Territory, which we compared with two other urban districts in Australia (Sydney and South East Sydney) and three benchmark international health districts (Helsinki-Uusima (Finland), Verona (Italy) and Gipuzkoa (Spain)). We also compared our data with national level data where available. The Australian and Finnish regions had a larger and more highly skilled workforce than the southern European regions. The pattern of workforce availability and profile varied, even within the same country, at the local level. We found significant differences between regional rates of identified rates of psychiatrists and psychologists, and national averages. Using a standardised classification instrument at the local level, and our occupational groupings, we were able to assess the available workforce and provide information relevant to planners about the actual capacity of the system. Data obtained at local level is critical to providing planners with reliable data to inform their decision making.


Subject(s)
Mental Health Services/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data , Australia , Humans , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatry/statistics & numerical data , Social Workers/statistics & numerical data
14.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327681

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses have been at the forefront of the pandemic response, involved in extensive coordination of services, screening, vaccination and front-line work in respiratory, emergency and intensive care environments. The nature of this work is often intense and stress-provoking with an inevitable psychological impact on nurses and all healthcare workers. This study focused on nurses working in respiratory areas with the aim of identifying and characterising the self-reported issues that exacerbated or alleviated their concerns during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was developed consisting of 90 questions using a mixture of open-ended and closed questions. Participant demographic data were also collected (age, gender, ethnicity, number of years qualified, details of long-term health conditions, geographical location, nursing background/role and home life). The online survey was disseminated via social media and professional respiratory societies (British Thoracic Society, Primary Care Respiratory Society, Association of Respiratory Nurse Specialists) over a 3-week period in May 2020 and the survey closed on 1 June 2020. RESULTS: The study highlights the experiences of nurses caring for respiratory patients during the first wave of the pandemic in early 2020. Concerns were expressed over the working environment, the supply and availability of adequate protective personal equipment, the quality of care individuals were able to deliver, and the impact on mental health to nurses and their families. A high number provided free-text comments around their worries and concerns about the impact on their household; these included bringing the virus home, the effect on family members worrying about them, mental health and the impact of changing working patterns, and managing with children. Although both formal and informal support were available, there were inconsistencies in provision, highlighting the importance of nursing leadership and management in ensuring equity of access to services. CONCLUSIONS: Support for staff is essential both throughout the pandemic and afterwards, and it is important that preparation of individuals regarding building resilience is recognised. It is also clear that psychological support and services for nurses and the wider healthcare team need to be available and quickly convened in the event of similar major incidents, either global or local.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Leadership , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychosocial Support Systems , Respiratory Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
15.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(12): 651-655, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1310944

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency of hand dermatitis among nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic and factors affecting its prevalence. METHODS: The research sample consisted of 175 nurses working in state hospitals. Research data were collected via Google survey between September and October 2020. The data were collected using a sociodemographic data collection form, and a self-assessment form was used to determine dermatologic symptoms. RESULTS: The frequency of hand dermatitis among nurses was 70.9%. A statistically significant difference was found between sex, allergy history, and increased frequency of handwashing and the frequency of hand dermatitis. No significant difference in terms of the frequency of hand dermatitis was found between nurses who provided care to patients who were COVID-19 positive versus nurses who provided care to patients who were COVID-19 negative. However, the frequency of washing hands and using hand disinfectants and hand creams was found to have increased significantly during the COVID-19 pandemic compared to the prepandemic period. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of hand dermatitis increased among nurses during the pandemic. The increased frequency of handwashing during the pandemic poses a risk for hand dermatitis among nurses, although this should not discourage nurses from appropriate hygiene.


Subject(s)
Dermatitis/diagnosis , Hand/physiopathology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Dermatitis/epidemiology , Female , Hand Disinfection , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Turkey/epidemiology
16.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25924, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262276

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: At present, coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) remains a significant challenge for health workers around the world. This survey aims to highlight the status of the implementation of occupational protection measures for nurses working on the front line against COVID-19, and to analyze the problems in the process of wearing protective equipment.This cross-sectional study was conducted among 165 nurses who worked in COVID-19-stricken areas in China in March 2020. The questionnaire covered 3 aspects, namely: general information, the current condition of protective equipment wearing, and the wearing experience of protective equipment.A total of 160 (96.97%) valid questionnaires were collected. The average time of wearing protective equipment for the nurses surveyed was 6.38 ±â€Š3.30 hours per working day. For first-line nurses with low risk of infection, repeated wear of protective equipment was as follows: medical protective mask 30.77%, double latex gloves 8.46%, goggles/protective mask 15.38%, protective suit 15.38%; less wear of protective equipment were as follows: work cap 7.69%, surgical mask 7.69%, single layer latex gloves 30.77%, goggles/protective mask 30.77%, and isolation gown 46.15%. For nurses who were at moderate risk of infection, repeated wear of protective equipment was as follows: surgical mask 62.22%, goggles/protective mask 68.89%, and isolation gown 65.56%; less wear: work cap 3.33%, medical protective mask 15.56%, latex gloves 15.56%, goggles/protective mask 5.56%, and protective suit 16.67%. For front-line nurses with high risk of infection, repeated wear of protective equipment was as follows: surgical mask 64.91%, more than double latex gloves 8.77%, goggles/protective mask 75.44%, isolation gown 75.44%; less wear: work cap 1.75%, medical protective mask 1.75%, latex gloves 26.32%, goggles/ protective mask 1.75%, protective suit 1.75%. The main discomforts of wearing protective equipment were poor vision due to fogging (81.88%), stuffiness (79.38%), poor mobility (74.38%), sweating (72.5%), and skin damage (61.25%).More detailed personal protection standards should be developed, and the work load of nurses should be reduced. Actions should be taken to ensure the scientific implementation of personal protective measures. To solve practical clinical problems, future protective equipment may focus on the research and development of protective equipment applicable for different risk levels, as well as the research on integrated design, fabric innovation, and reusability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , China , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 179-186, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249348

ABSTRACT

Among the many lessons that have been reinforced by the SARS-COVID-19 pandemic is the failure of our current fee-for-service health care system to either adequately respond to patient needs or offer financial sustainability. This has enhanced bipartisan interest in moving forward with value-based payment reforms. Nurses have a rich history of innovative care models that speak to their potential centrality in delivery system reforms. However, deficits in terms of educational preparation, and in some cases resistance, to considering cost alongside quality, has hindered the profession's contribution to the conversation about value-based payments and their implications for system change. Addressing this deficit will allow nurses to more fully engage in redesigning health care to better serve the physical, emotional, and economic well-being of this nation. It also has the potential to unleash nurses from the tethers of a fee-for-service system where they have been relegated to a labor cost and firmly locate nurses in a value-generating role. Nurse administrators and educators bear the responsibility for preparing nurses for this next chapter of nursing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/economics , Nurses/psychology , Value-Based Health Insurance , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control
18.
Curr Opin Psychiatry ; 34(4): 413-419, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1232247

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The COVID-19 outbreak has had major impact on individual's psychological health and overall well being worldwide. Evidence shows that these psychological challenges are especially prominent in healthcare workers (HCW); especially in nurses. Indeed, several studies report that nurses suffer more psychologically because of the consequences of the pandemic compared with medical doctors. To further look into this, we systematically review the recent literature to see whether the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic differs between medical doctors and nurses across studies and which aspects of mental health are especially affected in nurses. RECENT FINDINGS: Across studies, there is solid evidence that nurses show poorer mental health outcomes compared with medical doctors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This is especially true for symptoms of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Here, prevalence rates in nurses are often higher than 50%. In contrast, general stress levels and burnout seem to be comparable between nurses and medical doctors. SUMMARY: Given that nurses suffer more from depression, anxiety and PTSD symptoms during the COVID-19 pandemic, special programs addressing their needs are required.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Appl Nurs Res ; 60: 151437, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1227973

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The US healthcare settings and staff have been stretched to capacity by the COVID-19 pandemic. While COVID-19 continues to threaten global healthcare delivery systems and populations, its impact on nursing has been profound. OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to document nurses' immediate reactions, major stressors, effective measures to reduce stress, coping strategies, and motivators as they provided care during COVID-19. DESIGN: Mixed-methods, cross sectional design. Participants responded to objective and open-ended questions on the COVID-19 Nurses' Survey. PARTICIPANTS: The survey, was sent to nurses employed in health care settings during the pandemic; 110 nurses participated. RESULTS: Immediate reactions of respondents were nervousness and call of duty; major stressors were uncertainty, inflicting the virus on family, lack of personal protective equipment (PPE), and protocol inconsistencies. Effective measures to reduce stress identified were financial incentives and mental health support. Most frequently used coping strategies were limiting televised news about the virus, talking with family and friends, and information, Motivators to participate in future care included having adequate PPE and sense of duty. Bivariate analysis of outcomes by age group, education, work setting, and marital status was performed. Nurse respondents with higher advanced degrees had significantly less fear than those with BSN-only degrees (p < .05).Of respondents who were married/living with a partner, 85.9% listing "uncertainty about when the pandemic will be under control" as a major stressor (p < .05), while 62.8% of those who were single/divorced/widowed (p = .015) did so. Further, 75% of respondents working in critical care listed "mental health services" as important (p = .054). Four major qualitative themes emerged: What is going on here?; How much worse can this get?; What do I do now?; What motivates me to do future work? CONCLUSION: The study found nurses were motivated by ethical duty to care for patients with COVID-19 despite risk to self and family, leaving nurses vulnerable to moral distress and burnout. This research articulates the need for psychological support, self- care initiatives, adequate protection, information, and process improvements in the healthcare systems to reduce the risk of moral distress, injury and burnout among nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Pandemics , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
20.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 226-233, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1211445

ABSTRACT

New York City quickly became the epicenter of coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) in early March of 2020. While hospitals were aware of the potential of COVID-19, the volume of critically ill patients that flooded the hospitals in the New York City area was clearly not anticipated. Hospital staff worked quickly to create COVID-19-free areas, but were overcome with the volume of COVID-positive critically ill patients. Many newly admitted patients required respiratory support with mechanical ventilation. As Governor Cuomo issued executive orders to stay at home in mid-March, some patients were afraid to go into hospitals despite symptoms of respiratory distress. Once these patients came to the hospital, they were often critically ill. Emergency departments and intensive care units filled rapidly, overwhelming staff and equipment needs with such things as pumps, dialysis machines, medications, and personal protective equipment. Plans for the day were disrupted with frequent rapid response calls and the need for additional beds. Key issues that confronted the COVID-19 response in critical care units at NYU Langone Health included communication, patient and staff safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care Nursing/trends , Nurses/psychology , Critical Care Nursing/methods , Humans , New York , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution
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