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5.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254077, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295523

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurse identification of patient deterioration is critical, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic, as patients can deteriorate quickly. While the literature has shown that nurses rely on intuition to make decisions, there is limited information on what sources of data experienced nurses utilize to inform their intuition. The objectives of this study were to identify sources of data that inform nurse decision-making related to recognition of deteriorating patients, and explore how COVID-19 has impacted nurse decision-making. METHODS: In this qualitative study, experienced nurses voluntarily participated in focused interviews. During focused interviews, expert nurses were asked to share descriptions of memorable patient encounters, and questions were posed to facilitate reflections on thoughts and actions that hindered or helped their decision-making. They were also asked to consider the impact of COVID-19 on nursing and decision-making. Interviews were transcribed verbatim, study team members reviewed transcripts and coded responses, and organized key findings into themes. RESULTS: Several themes related to decision-making were identified by the research team, including: identifying patient care needs, workload management, and reflecting on missed care opportunities to inform learning. Participants (n = 10) also indicated that COVID-19 presented a number of unique barriers to nurse decision-making. CONCLUSIONS: Findings from this study indicate that experienced nurses utilize several sources of information to inform their intuition. It is apparent that the demands on nurses in response to pandemics are heightened. Decision-making themes drawn from participants' experiences can to assist nurse educators for training nursing students on decision-making for deteriorating patients and how to manage the potential barriers (e.g., resource constraints, lack of family) associated with caring for patients during these challenging times prior to encountering these issues in the clinical environment. Nurse practice can utilize these findings to increase awareness among experienced nurses on recognizing how pandemic situations can impact to their decision-making capability.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Clinical Decision-Making , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Assessment , Professional-Family Relations , Qualitative Research , Symptom Assessment , Workload
6.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VI(1): 1-6, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257357

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has dominated people's lives since late 2019, for more than nine months now. Healthcare resources and medicine have been completely consumed by the Covid 19 illness globally. This is a particularly difficult time for health systems because of the onerous responsibility to care for large numbers of sick people, protecting populations from contracting the infection by effective quarantine, isolation, and containment measures. In addition to this burden of work, healthcare providers are also overcome by fear of contracting the infection and transmitting it to their loved ones. It is during such difficult times that the integrity of healthcare providers is challenged. In this paper I will describe some challenges that a healthcare provider in a typical low resource setting faces during this pandemic time, and will propose the idea of "flexible adamancy" to address these challenges to the health system's integrity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/standards , Moral Obligations , Nursing Care/ethics , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Care/standards , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/ethics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Quarantine/ethics , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(3): 156-161, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219129

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to test the effectiveness of a daylong resilience retreat on healthcare professionals' anxiety levels, intention to engage in mindfulness practices, and self-efficacy around mindfulness. BACKGROUND: Caregiver burnout is a concern that needs to be addressed at the organizational level so that professionals can reduce their risk of psychological injury while providing high-quality care. The COVID-19 (novel coronavirus) pandemic has exacerbated symptoms of burnout among nurses nationally. METHODS: Ten sessions of daylong resilience retreats were delivered to independent groups of nurses, nurse practitioners, and other healthcare professionals. Preretreat and postretreat assessments were completed using a 19-item survey developed by the research team to assess state anxiety, intention to engage in mindfulness practices, and self-efficacy around mindfulness. RESULTS: One hundred six healthcare professionals completed the resilience retreats. There was a statistically significant decrease in state anxiety scores following the retreat. The majority of the participants reported high intentions to engage in mindfulness practices and felt confident about incorporating mindfulness in their lives. CONCLUSIONS: Brief resilience retreats endorsed by nurse leadership can reduce perceived anxiety and facilitate engagement in contemplative practices, which are associated with a decrease in the risk of burnout.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Mindfulness , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Leadership , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Pandemics , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
9.
Rev. gaúch. enferm ; 42(spe): e20200217, 2021.
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1159519

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT Objective: To discuss the emotional labor in pediatric nursing considering the repercussions of COVID-19 in childhood and adolescence. Method: Reflexion based on theoretical aspects and scientific evidence of emotional labor in pediatric nursing. Results: Given the repercussions of COVID-19 on children and adolescents, it is up to the nurse to recognize them and nurture a non-traumatic and affectionate care. However, measures to control the disease affect the care provided. In this context, emotional labor process become essential, as they guide the management of the child's and family's emotions, associated with the suffering caused by the pandemic and the nurse's emotional experience when caring. Conclusion: Emotional support and care processes are essential in pediatrics, especially in a stressful time such as a pandemic, which requires the positive transformation of the intense and disturbing experiences of people for them to achieve psychosocial well-being.


RESUMEN Objetivo: Reflexión sobre el trabajo emocional en enfermería pediátrica considerando las repercusiones de COVID-19 en infancia y adolescencia. Método: Reflexión basada en aspectos teóricos y evidencia científica del trabajo emocional en enfermería pediátrica. Resultados: Cabe a la enfermera reconocer las repercusiones de COVID-19 en niños y adolescentes, fomentando una atención no traumática y afectiva. Sin embargo, las medidas para controlar la enfermedad implican en la forma de la atención. En ese contexto, el trabajo emocional es esencial, ya que guía el manejo de las emociones de niños y de sus familias, asociadas al sufrimiento causado por la pandemia y a la experiencia emocional de la enfermera en el cuidado. Conclusiones: El trabajo emocional es esencial en pediatría, especialmente en una situación estresante como la pandemia, que requiere la transformación positiva de las experiencias intensas y perturbadoras de las personas en interacción para lograr el bienestar psicosocial.


RESUMO Objetivo: Refletir sobre o trabalho emocional em enfermagem pediátrica face às repercussões da COVID-19 na infância e adolescência. Método: Reflexão embasada em aspectos teóricos e evidências científicas do trabalho emocional em enfermagem pediátrica. Resultados: Diante das repercussões da COVID-19 em crianças e adolescentes, cabe ao enfermeiro reconhecê-las e nutrir o cuidado não traumático e afetuoso. No entanto, observam-se implicações das medidas de controle da doença na forma de cuidar. Nesta conjuntura, o trabalho emocional torna-se essencial à medida que orienta a gestão das emoções da criança e família, associadas ao sofrimento causado pela pandemia e à experiência emocional do enfermeiro ao cuidar. Conclusão: O trabalho emocional é imprescindível em pediatria, sobretudo em um momento estressante como o de pandemia, o qual requer a transformação positiva das vivências intensas e perturbadoras das pessoas em interação para o alcance do bem-estar psicossocial.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child, Preschool , Child , Adolescent , Pediatric Nursing , Emotions , Pandemics , COVID-19/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Affect
11.
Br J Nurs ; 29(10): 585, 2020 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1122320

ABSTRACT

Sam Foster, Chief Nurse, Oxford University Hospitals, considers how leaders can help their staff in times of stress, grief and bereavement during the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bereavement , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/psychology , Empathy , Grief , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , State Medicine , Stress, Psychological , United Kingdom
12.
J Christ Nurs ; 37(4): 204, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099644
13.
Nurs Ethics ; 28(1): 3-5, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081656
14.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(1): 69-75, 2021 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083871

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of psychological effects from the COVID-19 pandemic is significant and manifests as stress, anxiety, depression, sleeplessness, and, in some cases, suicide. The need for psychological support services for healthcare providers should be included in all pandemic and disaster planning. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this article is to explore the potential psychological sequelae of nursing during a pandemic and to provide recommendations to support a psychologically healthy work environment. METHODS: Highlights from the literature on psychological sequelae, symptoms, and outcomes related to COVID-19 and prior pandemics is presented, along with insight from the experiences of oncology nurses caring for patients with COVID-19. FINDINGS: Destigmatizing mental health needs for healthcare providers empowers them to seek support. Hospital administrators must develop proactive wellness plans for the triage and management of mental and emotional health needs during a pandemic that prioritize transparent communication, resources for healthcare providers within and beyond the clinical setting, and training.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
J Adv Nurs ; 77(2): 869-878, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-910375

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore the emotional impact and experiences of geriatric nurses working in nursing homes and caring for patients with coronavirus 2019 disease (COVID-19). DESIGN: This is a qualitative study with phenomenological method and data were gathered through in-depth interview. METHODS: The experiences and expectations that nurses are facing during their care duties were explored via video conference, using a semi-structured interview guide. We have followed the Consolidated criteria for reporting qualitative research COREQ. RESULTS: Interviews (N=24) were conducted with nurses from four countries (Spain, Italy, Peru, and Mexico) during April 2020. Three main categories were extracted: fear of the pandemic situation, the sense of duty and professional commitment, and emotional exhaustion. CONCLUSIONS: Regardless of the country and situation, in the face of the pandemic, dramatic situations have been experienced in nursing homes worldwide, with nursing staff feeling exhausted and overwhelmed, and reflection is urged on a global level to consider the most appropriate model of care in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Geriatric Nursing , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Homes , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain/epidemiology
16.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(11): 496-497, 2020 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890434

ABSTRACT

The impact of long shifts, the puzzling illnesses and manifestations of COVID-19, its personal and family impacts, and the sustained grief of many losses in the past 6 months requires consideration of interventions to lift caregivers' spirits. Burnout has long been a challenge for nurses working in intense acute environments. Today, the risk and effects are even greater. Animal-assisted support is one intervention that shows some promise in supporting employee well-being. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(11):496-497].


Subject(s)
Animal Assisted Therapy/methods , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Burnout, Professional/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
17.
Nurs Outlook ; 68(6): 838-844, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-739077

ABSTRACT

Registered nurses are an essential workforce group across the globe. They use their expertise and skill sets every day in clinical practice to protect, promote, and advocate on behalf of patients and families under their care. In this article we discuss the physical, emotional, and moral stresses that nurses are experiencing in their day-to-day practice settings created by the novel coronavirus. We consider the demands placed on nurses by unexpected patient surges within hospital environments and inadequate personal protective equipment and other critical resources, challenging nurses' ability to meet their professional and ethical obligations. We also share our thoughts on supporting nurses and others now, and ideas for needed healing for both individuals and organizations as we move forward. Finally, we argue for the need for substantive reform of institutional processes and systems that can deliver quality care in the future when faced with another devastating humanitarian and public health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Care/ethics , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/ethics , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Quality of Health Care/ethics , Adult , Coronavirus , Ethics, Nursing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress , Pandemics , United States
19.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(7): 304-308, 2020 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-613180

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic that is sweeping across the globe has impacted all health care professionals in multiple ways. This article surveyed a cross-section of the nursing profession from across the United States from the ANCC Practice Transition Accreditation Program® and ANCC Commission on Accreditation in Practice Transition Program. The article summarizes how they responded to the pandemic, addressed challenges, and learned valuable lessons. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(7):304-308.].


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Adult , COVID-19 , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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