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7.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(4): 220-225, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334307

ABSTRACT

Rapid response is a common term in hospital settings, reflecting immediate clinical response to a critical challenge. In preparation for the oncoming pandemic of novel coronavirus 2019, nurse leaders within a large health system in the Mountain West region implemented a rapid response to prepare nondirect care registered nurses for deployment to the bedside. This article highlights the prompt action, organization, and implementation of this process, as well as the lessons learned for future events.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence/standards , Nurses/standards , Nursing Care/standards , Organizational Innovation , Humans , Leadership , United States
8.
J Correct Health Care ; 27(2): 89-102, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262061

ABSTRACT

During a pandemic, basic public health precautions must be taken across settings and populations. However, confinement conditions change what can be done in correctional settings. Correctional nursing (CN) care, like all nursing care, needs to be named and encoded to be recognized and used to generate data that will advance the discipline and maintain standards of care. The Omaha System is a standardized interprofessional terminology that has been used since 1992 to guide and document care. In 2019, a collaboration between the newly formed American Correctional Nurses Association and the Omaha System Community of Practice began a joint effort with other stakeholders aimed at encoding evidence-based pandemic response interventions used in CN. The resulting guidelines are included and illustrated with examples from CN practice.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Correctional Facilities/standards , Documentation/standards , Nurses/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Nurses/organization & administration , Nursing Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
9.
Indian J Med Ethics ; VI(1): 1-6, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1257357

ABSTRACT

The Covid-19 pandemic has dominated people's lives since late 2019, for more than nine months now. Healthcare resources and medicine have been completely consumed by the Covid 19 illness globally. This is a particularly difficult time for health systems because of the onerous responsibility to care for large numbers of sick people, protecting populations from contracting the infection by effective quarantine, isolation, and containment measures. In addition to this burden of work, healthcare providers are also overcome by fear of contracting the infection and transmitting it to their loved ones. It is during such difficult times that the integrity of healthcare providers is challenged. In this paper I will describe some challenges that a healthcare provider in a typical low resource setting faces during this pandemic time, and will propose the idea of "flexible adamancy" to address these challenges to the health system's integrity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/standards , Moral Obligations , Nursing Care/ethics , Nursing Care/psychology , Nursing Care/standards , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Humans , India , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/ethics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Quarantine/ethics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 234-242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249347

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic hit southeast Michigan hard and a rapid influx of patients forced Beaumont Health to shift rapidly into an emergency management model with a laser focus on transforming clinical care and administrative processes to meet complex patient care needs. Navigating this landscape required agility, surge planning, strong interprofessional teams, transformational leadership, nurse-led innovations, support, and transparency to manage the ever-changing environment. This article explains nursing's response and nurse-led innovations that were implemented to meet the needs of the community, patients, and staff, as well as lessons learned to ensure preparedness for any potential future surge.


Subject(s)
Creativity , Nursing Care/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Advanced Practice Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Nurse Administrators/trends , Nursing Care/methods , Nursing Care/standards , Personnel Management/methods , Personnel Management/statistics & numerical data
12.
Am J Nurs ; 121(4): 65-68, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1209640

ABSTRACT

This article is one in a series in which contributing authors discuss how the United Nations (UN) Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are linked to everyday clinical issues; national public health emergencies; and other nursing issues, such as leadership, shared governance, and advocacy. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development, a 15-year plan of action to achieve the goals, was unanimously adopted by all UN member states in September 2015 and took effect on January 1, 2016. The Agenda consists of 17 SDGs addressing social, economic, and environmental determinants of health and 169 associated targets focused on five themes: people, planet, peace, prosperity, and partnership. The SDGs build on the work of the UN Millennium Development Goals, which were in effect from 2000 to 2015. The current article highlights SDGs 5 (gender equality), 8 (decent work and economic growth), and 17 (partnerships for the goals), along with the advocacy of these goals by Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing in the UN system.


Subject(s)
Gender Equity , Global Health/standards , Guidelines as Topic , Nursing Care/standards , Organizational Objectives , Public Health/standards , Sustainable Development , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , United Nations
16.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 74Suppl 1(Suppl 1): e20200281, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090511

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to report the experience of professors and students of a graduate course on nursing care in coping with the new coronavirus (COVID-19) based on Self-Care Theory. METHOD: the active methodologies used were a literature search and seminar presentations, with an understanding of Orem's theoretical concepts: health; man; self-care; universal, developmental and health deviation requirements; self-care activities; self-care deficits; the required therapeutic demand; nursing systems. The pandemic was considered a health deviation that requires critical thinking and nursing care planning. Methodological frameworks to classify nursing diagnoses, interventions, and outcomes were used. RESULTS: for each health deviation, nursing systems were identified; self-care deficits, diagnoses; actions, interventions; and the form of assessment, outcomes. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: theoretical-practical reflections of the academic context support nursing care planning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Nursing Care/standards , Planning Techniques , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Brazil , Curriculum , Female , Health Policy , Humans , Male , Nursing Theory , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
17.
J Am Assoc Nurse Pract ; 33(2): 97-99, 2021 Feb 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1075657

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The year 2020 was one of tremendous challenge and change for our communities and our profession. As the next decade unfolds, the doctor of nursing practice (DNP) will be required for entry to practice as a nurse practitioner (NP), and we will all continue to recover individually and as a nation from the experiences of the year 2020. Doctor of nursing practice-prepared NPs need to be equipped to take the lead in post-COVID recovery and the challenges the US health care system faces through an increased emphasis on curricula and clinical experiences focused on health disparities, community health, and health promotion.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Graduate/organization & administration , Nurse Practitioners/education , Nurse Practitioners/standards , Nursing Care/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Clinical Competence , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
18.
Front Public Health ; 8: 560606, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1063365

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to investigate the knowledge, attitude, and practice (KAP) on Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) care among nursing staff and analyze its influencing factors. The survey was conducted on February 18, 2020, among 7,716 voluntary participants from 143 medical institutions in Zhejiang, China. The findings indicated that KAP of nursing staff scored well. However, the accuracy of psychological nursing knowledge was much lower, 14.3% only. Nursing staff working in isolation wards have higher knowledge (OR = 1.776, 95% CI: 1.491-2.116), attitude (OR = 1.542, 95% CI: 1.298-1.832), and practice (OR = 1.902, 95% CI: 1.590-2.274) scores than those in general wards. In terms of KAP, nursing staff with working experience ≤ 10 years scored lower than those with working experience ≥ 20 years, with OR values of 0.490 (95% CI: 0.412-0.583), 0.654 (95% CI: 0.551-0.775), and 0.747 (95% CI: 0.629-0.886), respectively. It is necessary to take measures to enhance the training on COVID-19, especially for KAP of junior nurses in general wards.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Nursing Care/standards , Nursing Staff/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , China , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Pain Manag Nurs ; 22(2): 103-110, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005694

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has led caregivers to modify patient healthcare, with a high impact on patients with chronic pain. AIMS: To map recommendations for the management of chronic pain patients during the COVID-19 pandemic and propose a workflow for the management of these patients. DESIGN: This was a scoping review. METHODS: The databases searched were PubMed, Embase, CINAHL, Scopus, Cochrane Library, and LILACS. The studies were examined by two independent reviewers. The disagreements between reviewers were resolved through discussion or with a third reviewer. RESULTS: We presented the results in the form of a table, a workflow, and a narrative summary. The search resulted in 13 studies selected for full reading, including one consensus, five guidance documents, two expert panels, one joint statement, two educational flyers, and two free comments. We considered new technologies, including telemedicine. Each pain service needs to establish a screening model, classifying patients according to corresponding severity. Particular attention should be given to patients who use opioids and are at risk of misusing them. Nonpharmacological approaches and pain education should be maintained, considering the use of telehealth. CONCLUSIONS: Recommendations for the management of chronic pain during COVID-19 include adjustments to the patient care model. The workflow proposes the use of telemedicine, screening for painful intensity, and the use of color-signaled intervention packages according to severity (green, yellow, and red).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Chronic Pain/nursing , Nursing Care/standards , Pain Management/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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