Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 8 de 8
Filter
1.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(7): 344, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1522332
3.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 234-242, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1249347

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic hit southeast Michigan hard and a rapid influx of patients forced Beaumont Health to shift rapidly into an emergency management model with a laser focus on transforming clinical care and administrative processes to meet complex patient care needs. Navigating this landscape required agility, surge planning, strong interprofessional teams, transformational leadership, nurse-led innovations, support, and transparency to manage the ever-changing environment. This article explains nursing's response and nurse-led innovations that were implemented to meet the needs of the community, patients, and staff, as well as lessons learned to ensure preparedness for any potential future surge.


Subject(s)
Creativity , Nursing Care/trends , Pandemics/prevention & control , Advanced Practice Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Nurse Administrators/trends , Nursing Care/methods , Nursing Care/standards , Personnel Management/methods , Personnel Management/statistics & numerical data
4.
Am J Nurs ; 121(4): 57-60, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1205878

ABSTRACT

This is the last of three articles exploring ways in which frontline nurses may be affected by recommendations of the forthcoming National Academy of Medicine Future of Nursing 2020-2030 study. For this third article, interviews were conducted with nurse leaders from diverse practice areas to see how their thinking about the future had shifted as 2020 drew to a close.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Leadership , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nursing Care/trends , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Forecasting , Humans , United States
5.
J Neurosci Nurs ; 53(3): 123-128, 2021 Jun 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1158037

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Alteration in olfaction, the sense of smell, can lead to a surprisingly high level of functional disability. Effects can range from mild changes in nutrient intake to a significant decrease in quality of life. Olfactory dysfunction can follow clinical problems such as trauma to the brain and nose. During recent months, in the setting of the current worldwide pandemic of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), the infection caused by severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, it has become clear that olfaction can also be damaged by viruses that enter the body through the nose. METHODS: To learn more about this important clinical problem, we reviewed the current literature about smell sensation and the contextual application of altered olfaction in the setting of COVID-19. Knowledge about this topic, along with other clinical aspects of COVID-19, is expanding quickly. CONCLUSION: Nurses perform assessments, assist with implementing treatment interventions, and provide vital education to patients and their families. These interventions help patients with olfactory dysfunction achieve the best possible functional outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Nursing Care/methods , Smell/physiology , COVID-19/physiopathology , Humans , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Care/trends , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Quality of Life/psychology
8.
J Transcult Nurs ; 32(2): 96-102, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-713478

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The World Health Organization declared the COVID-19 outbreak as a Public Health Emergency of International Concern on January 31, 2020. China was the first country to experience the challenges of controlling COVID-19. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the experiences of Chinese nurses who countermarched to the outbreak city for medical support in the very first period of this global infection. METHODOLOGY: A qualitative study of phenomenological research design was used to describe the experiences of 10 Chinese nurses. Data were collected in February 2020 through in-depth interviews and analyzed by conventional content analysis methods. RESULTS: Chinese nurses experienced different psychological stages, work pressure, and challenges. New concepts of nursing also emerged during their clinical care for COVID-19 patients. DISCUSSION: The guidance synthesized from the Chinese nurse stories could give specific direction for a well-prepared global nursing workforce and high-quality patient care in the present and future epidemics. The worries about discrimination of COVID-19 patients' needs to be addressed culturally and emotionally as a priority by health care workers when they care for COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Nurses/psychology , Volunteers/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/prevention & control , China , Humans , Motivation , Nursing Care/methods , Nursing Care/trends , Qualitative Research
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...