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1.
Psychiatry Res ; 291: 113294, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640985

ABSTRACT

To cope with Covid-19 and limits its spread among residents, retirement homes have prohibited physical contact between residents and families and friend and, in some cases, even between residents or between residents and caregivers. We investigated the effects of measures against Covid-19 on the mental health of participants with Alzheimer's disease (AD) who live in retirement homes in France. We instructed on-site caregivers to assess depression and anxiety in participants with mild AD who live in retirement homes. Fifty-eight participants consented to participate in the study. The participants rated their depression and anxiety during and before the Covid-19 crisis. Participants reported higher depression (p = .005) and anxiety (p = .004) during than before the Covid-19 crisis. These increases can be attributed to the isolation of the residents and/or to the drastic changes in their daily life and care they receive. While, in their effort to prevent infections, retirement homes are forced to physically separate residents from the outside world and to drastically reduce residents' activities, these decisions are likely to come at a cost to residents with AD and their mental health.


Subject(s)
Alzheimer Disease/complications , Anxiety/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections , Depression/diagnosis , Homes for the Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alzheimer Disease/psychology , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/psychology , Betacoronavirus , Caregivers , Depression/complications , Depression/psychology , Female , France , Humans , Male , Nursing Homes , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Lakartidningen ; 1172020 06 26.
Article in Swedish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-618554

ABSTRACT

A large proportion of deaths worldwide have occurred among elderly living in nursing homes. Sweden is no exception with a comparable proportion making up around half of all deaths. The elderly, frail individuals living in nursing homes are among the most vulnerable and with the highest risk to die of covid-19. In spite of that we see almost two-thirds of the infected are still alive with a majority recovering fully after receiving treatment at the nursing home. Of 8 057 residents living in nursing homes in Stockholm, 1 464 (18 %) individuals have so far been diagnosed  with covid-19 and 532 have died (6 % of all residents). Importantly, this means that a great majority of the residents are still alive including almost two-thirds (932/1 464) of the infected individuals.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Frail Elderly , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Survival Analysis , Sweden/epidemiology
3.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 68(8): 1657-1660, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-767516

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Long-term care (LTC) facilities are particularly dangerous places for the spread of COVID-19 given that they house vulnerable high-risk populations. Transmission-based precautions to protect residents, employees, and families alike must account for potential risks posed by LTC workers' second jobs and unpaid care work. This observational study describes the prevalence of their (1) second jobs, and (2) unpaid care work for dependent children and/or adult relatives (double- and triple-duty caregiving) overall and by occupational group (registered nurses [RNs], licensed practical nurses [LPNs], or certified nursing assistants [CNAs]). DESIGN: A descriptive secondary analysis of data collected as part of the final wave of the Work, Family and Health Study. SETTING: Thirty nursing home facilities located throughout the northeastern United States. PARTICIPANTS: A subset of 958 essential facility-based LTC workers involved in direct patient care. MEASUREMENTS: We present information on LTC workers' demographic characteristics, health, features of their LTC occupation, additional paid work, wages, and double- or triple-duty caregiving roles. RESULTS: Most LTC workers were CNAs, followed by LPNs and RNs. Overall, more than 70% of these workers agreed or strongly agreed with this statement: "When you are sick, you still feel obligated to come into work." One-sixth had a second job, where they worked an average of 20 hours per week, and more than 60% held double- or triple-duty caregiving roles. Additional paid work and unpaid care work characteristics did not significantly differ by occupational group, although the prevalence of second jobs was highest and accompanying work hours were longest among CNAs. CONCLUSION: LTC workers commonly hold second jobs along with double- and triple-duty caregiving roles. To slow the spread of COVID-19, both the paid and unpaid activities of these employees warrant consideration in the identification of appropriate clinical, policy, and informal supports. J Am Geriatr Soc 68:1657-1660, 2020.


Subject(s)
Caregivers/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Long-Term Care/statistics & numerical data , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , Female , Health Services Needs and Demand , Humans , Licensed Practical Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Male , New England , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Assistants/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes , Work-Life Balance
4.
Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil ; 18(3): 238-240, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-749031

ABSTRACT

The Coronarovirus disease 2019 (Covid-19) outbreak strongly affected nursing and was responsible for a high mortality rate. During the pandemic of March-May 2020, 17 French nursing homes organized staff confinement periods with residents 24 hours a day and 7 days a week, to reduce the risk of entry of the SARS-CoV-2 virus into their facilities, in a context where visits to residents were prohibited. By means of a telephone survey of their directors, we observed that 16 nursing homes (94%) had no cases of COVID-19 among the residents, and that mortality from COVID-19 was very low compared to that recorded at the national level by Santé publique France (p<10-4). Moreover, the number of cases of Covid-19 among the staff of these nursing homes was also lower than that recorded by Santé publique France (p<10-4). These establishments experienced certain difficulties which the directors managed to overcome and the investment of these teams was widely appreciated by the families of the residents and through the press.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Quarantine , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Disease Outbreaks , Female , France , Health Personnel , Humans
5.
Monaldi Arch Chest Dis ; 90(3)2020 Sep 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-740518

ABSTRACT

Lung Ultrasound (LUS) is regarded to be potentially useful to diagnose lung injury in older adults living in nursing homes with suspected COVID-19 pneumonia. We aimed at evaluating presence lung injury among senior nursing home residents by LUS performed with portable wireless scanner echography. The study population consisted of 150 residents with a mean age of 88 years (85% female) residing in 12 nursing homes in Northern Italy. Subjects had to have a history of recent onset of symptoms compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia or have been exposed to the contagion of patients carrying the disease. COVID-19 testing was performed with SARS-CoV-2 nasal-pharyngeal (NP) swabs. Positive subjects to LUS scanning were considered those with non-coascelent B-lines in >3 zones, coalescent B-lines in >3 zones and with iperdensed patchy non-consolidated lungs. Sixty-three percent had positive NP testing and 65% had LUS signs of pulmonary injury. LUS had a sensitivity of 79% in predicting positive NP testing. Sixteen percent of residents tested negative for SARSCoV-2 carried the signs of COVID-19 lung injury at LUS. There were 92 patients (61%) with current or recent symptoms.Positivity to LUS scanning was reported in 73% of residents with symptoms, while it was 53% in those without (P=0.016). A positive NP testing was observed in 66% of residents with symptoms and in 57% of those without (P=0.27). We conclude that assessment of LUS by portable wireless scanner echography can be profitability utilized to diagnose lung injury among senior nursing home residents with or without symptoms compatible with COVID-19 pneumonia.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Lung Injury/diagnostic imaging , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Point-of-Care Testing , Ultrasonography , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/physiopathology , Female , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/physiopathology , Predictive Value of Tests , Sensitivity and Specificity , Ultrasonography/instrumentation , Ultrasonography/methods , Wireless Technology
6.
J Korean Med Sci ; 35(34): e317, 2020 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-736662

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The novel coronavirus (coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]) outbreak began in China in December last year, and confirmed cases began occurring in Korea in mid-February 2020. Since the end of February, the rate of infection has increased greatly due to mass (herd) infection within religious groups and nursing homes in the Daegu and Gyeongbuk regions. This mass infection has increased the number of infected people more rapidly than was initially expected; the epidemic model based on existing studies had predicted a much lower infection rate and faster recovery. METHODS: The present study evaluated rapid infection spread by mass infection in Korea and the high mortality rate for the elderly and those with underlying diseases through the Susceptible-Exposed-Infected-Recovered-Dead (SEIRD) model. RESULTS: The present study demonstrated early infection peak occurrence (-6.3 days for Daegu and -5.3 days for Gyeongbuk) and slow recovery trend (= -1,486.6 persons for Daegu and -223.7 persons for Gyeongbuk) between the actual and the epidemic model for a mass infection region compared to a normal infection region. CONCLUSION: The analysis of the time difference between infection and recovery can help predict the epidemic peak due to mass (or normal) infection and can also be used as a time index to prepare medical resources.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Models, Statistical , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Time Factors , Young Adult
8.
Clin Interv Aging ; 15: 1427-1437, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-732243

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Demographic change and lack of specialized workforces are challenging. Likewise, home visits by general practitioners (GPs) become rarer. If a nursing home resident develops acute symptoms, nurses are often inclined to call the rescue service. Besides patient-related consequences, this might lead to unnecessary hospitalization and far-reaching health economic costs. Due to legal restrictions of remote treatment in Germany, which were recently loosened, telemedicine is still in the early stages. The aim of this study was to employ a holistic telemedical system for nursing homes which facilitates the connection to a GP and thus avoids unnecessary hospitalizations in the case of ambulatory-sensitive illnesses. Materials and Methods: After an inter-professional requirement analysis, the iterative development was started. In addition to an audio-video connection, several point of care measurements were integrated. Finally, first field tests were performed in a nursing home in a rural area in Germany. Results: One nursing home was equipped with telemedical system based on the results of the requirement analysis and tele-medically connected to a GP. Over a period of seven months, 56 routine and emergency teleconsultations took place. Only one of those required a hospital admission. In addition to video telephony, electrocardiography and assessment of vitals such as pulse, blood pressure, oxygen saturation and auscultation of heart and lungs were applied frequently. Conclusion: A telemedical system including integrated medical devices was successfully developed and has turned out to be helpful and even necessary for careful and reliable decision-making by the GP. First test results show high acceptance for elderly care. Involved patients, nurses, and the GP itemize various specific benefits, including economic, personal, and altruistic issues. Another issue that the current COVID-19 crisis brought to light is lowering the risk of contagion; GPs can replace their home visits by using telepresence combined with point of care measures.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , General Practice/methods , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/organization & administration , Aged , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Female , Germany , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Remote Consultation/instrumentation , Software , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Tidsskr Nor Laegeforen ; 140(11)2020 08 18.
Article in English, Norwegian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing home residents are generally old and frail, and at high risk that COVID-19 will take a serious course. Outbreaks of COVID-19 have not previously been described in Norway, and it is important to identify mechanisms for spread of the infection and course of disease for nursing home residents with this pandemic disease. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We included residents from three nursing homes with outbreaks of COVID-19 in a retrospective observational study, and we retrieved information on the number of staff for whom SARS-CoV-2 was confirmed or who were placed in quarantine. We present resident characteristics, course of disease and mortality associated with COVID-19 in the nursing homes, as well as providing a brief description of the outbreaks. RESULTS: Forty residents were included, 26 of whom were women. The average age was 86.2 years. Thirty-seven of the residents had atypical symptoms, nine of them were asymptomatic at the time of diagnosis, and 21 died during the coronavirus infection. Contact tracing indicated that the outbreaks may have originated from staff in the pre-symptomatic or early and mild phase of the disease. SARS-CoV-2 was detected in forty-two staff members, and a further 115 were placed in quarantine. INTERPRETATION: Many residents had atypical disease presentation, and the mortality from COVID-19 was high. Spread of infection may have originated from staff, also before they displayed obvious symptoms, and contributed to extensive spread of SARS-CoV-2 in the three nursing homes.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Homes for the Aged/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Homes/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Norway/epidemiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
10.
Semergen ; 46 Suppl 1: 26-34, 2020 Aug.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-724076

ABSTRACT

Rest homes for the elderly have been particularly hit during the crisis due the current COVID-19 pandemic. At the time of writing this article, more than 17,500 elderly people that lived in Care Homes have died due to coronavirus, more than 66% of the deaths. The infection and mortality rates in the institutionalised population are high. This is due to the advanced age, immune system deficit, and the presence of comorbidities, as well as because there are frail, because they live with other residents and carers in a closed institution, and transmission is easy in the context of a highly contagious and virulent virus. The elderly often have more severe forms of the disease. Atypical presentations are more frequent in the elderly and can delay the diagnosis. The Polymer Chain Reaction (PCR) test in the first 7 days for the detection of SARS-CoV-2 viral RNA is considered the test of reference ('Gold standard'). The criteria for referring to a hospital site from Care Homes should take into account an assessment of comorbidity, the severity, the presence of severe cognitive impairment, and the dependency or necessity of ventilatory support in seriously ill patients. The social-health centres should have contingency plans available in order to offer a response when cases of COVID-19 appear. Isolation during pandemics may have important physical and psychosocial consequences in the residents. It is necessary to reflect and claim a new residential model from a person-centered care approach that seeks the integration of health and social services.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Homes for the Aged , Nursing Homes , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Primary Health Care , Aged , Algorithms , Humans , Pandemics
13.
JAMA Netw Open ; 3(8): e2017533, 2020 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-712540

ABSTRACT

Importance: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a major threat to nursing homes. During the COVID-19 pandemic wave that hit France in March and April 2020, staff members of some French nursing homes decided to confine themselves with their residents on a voluntary basis to reduce the risk of entry of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 into the facility. Objective: To investigate COVID-19-related outcomes in French nursing homes that implemented voluntary staff confinement with residents. Design, Setting, and Participants: This retrospective cohort study was conducted in French nursing homes from March 1 to May 11, 2020. Participants included residents and staff members of the nursing homes where staff participated in voluntary self-confinement as well as those of the facilities for elderly people where staff did not practice self-confinement. Rates of COVID-19 cases and mortality in the cohort of nursing homes with self confinement were compared with those derived from a population-based survey of nursing homes conducted by French health authorities. Exposures: Nursing homes with staff who self-confined were identified from the media and included if the confinement period of staff with residents was longer than 7 days. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mortality related to COVID-19 among residents and COVID-19 cases among residents and staff members. COVID-19 was diagnosed by primary care or hospital physicians on the basis of fever and respiratory signs (eg, cough, dyspnea) or a clinical illness compatible with COVID-19; COVID-19 diagnoses were considered confirmed if real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 on nasopharyngeal swab was positive and considered possible if the test had not been performed or results were negative. Cases of COVID-19 were recorded by a telephone interview with the directors of nursing homes with staff who self-confined and by a nationwide declaration survey to health authorities for all facilities. Results: This study included 17 nursing homes in which 794 staff members confined themselves to the facility with their 1250 residents. The national survey included 9513 facilities with 385 290 staff members and 695 060 residents. Only 1 nursing home with staff who self-confined (5.8%) had cases of COVID-19 among residents, compared with 4599 facilities in the national survey (48.3%) (P < .001). Five residents (0.4%) in the nursing homes with staff who self-confined had confirmed COVID-19, compared with 30 569 residents (4.4%) with confirmed COVID-19 in the national survey (P < .001); no residents of facilities with self-confinement had possible COVID-19, compared with 31 799 residents (4.6%) with possible COVID-19 in the national survey (P < .001). Five residents (0.4%) in the nursing homes with staff who self-confined died of COVID-19, compared with 12 516 (1.8%) in the national survey (odds ratio, 0.22; 95% CI, 0.09-0.53; P < .001). Twelve staff members (1.6%) from the facilties with self-confinement had confirmed or possible COVID-19, compared with 29 463 staff members (7.6%) in the national survey (P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance: In this cohort study of French nursing homes during the COVID-19 pandemic, mortality rates related to COVID-19 were lower among nursing homes that implemented staff confinement with residents compared with those in a national survey. These findings suggest that self-confinement of staff members with residents may help protect nursing home residents from mortality related to COVID-19 and residents and staff from COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Homes for the Aged , Nursing Homes , Nursing Staff , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Social Isolation , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Coronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , France/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
Policy Polit Nurs Pract ; 21(3): 131, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-708991
15.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(32): 1095-1099, 2020 Aug 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-705516

ABSTRACT

Undetected infection with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) contributes to transmission in nursing homes, settings where large outbreaks with high resident mortality have occurred (1,2). Facility-wide testing of residents and health care personnel (HCP) can identify asymptomatic and presymptomatic infections and facilitate infection prevention and control interventions (3-5). Seven state or local health departments conducted initial facility-wide testing of residents and staff members in 288 nursing homes during March 24-June 14, 2020. Two of the seven health departments conducted testing in 195 nursing homes as part of facility-wide testing all nursing homes in their state, which were in low-incidence areas (i.e., the median preceding 14-day cumulative incidence in the surrounding county for each jurisdiction was 19 and 38 cases per 100,000 persons); 125 of the 195 nursing homes had not reported any COVID-19 cases before the testing. Ninety-five of 22,977 (0.4%) persons tested in 29 (23%) of these 125 facilities had positive SARS-CoV-2 test results. The other five health departments targeted facility-wide testing to 93 nursing homes, where 13,443 persons were tested, and 1,619 (12%) had positive SARS-CoV-2 test results. In regression analyses among 88 of these nursing homes with a documented case before facility-wide testing occurred, each additional day between identification of the first case and completion of facility-wide testing was associated with identification of 1.3 additional cases. Among 62 facilities that could differentiate results by resident and HCP status, an estimated 1.3 HCP cases were identified for every three resident cases. Performing facility-wide testing immediately after identification of a case commonly identifies additional unrecognized cases and, therefore, might maximize the benefits of infection prevention and control interventions. In contrast, facility-wide testing in low-incidence areas without a case has a lower proportion of test positivity; strategies are needed to further optimize testing in these settings.


Subject(s)
Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Nursing Homes , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Health Personnel , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , United States/epidemiology
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 69(32): 1089-1094, 2020 Aug 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-704559

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), can spread rapidly in nursing homes once it is introduced (1,2). To prevent outbreaks, more data are needed to identify sources of introduction and means of transmission within nursing homes. Nursing home residents who receive hemodialysis (dialysis) might be at higher risk for SARS-CoV-2 infections because of their frequent exposures outside the nursing home to both community dialysis patients and staff members at dialysis centers (3). Investigation of a COVID-19 outbreak in a Maryland nursing home (facility A) identified a higher prevalence of infection among residents undergoing dialysis (47%; 15 of 32) than among those not receiving dialysis (16%; 22 of 138) (p<0.001). Among residents with COVID-19, the 30-day hospitalization rate among those receiving dialysis (53%) was higher than that among residents not receiving dialysis (18%) (p = 0.03); the proportion of dialysis patients who died was 40% compared with those who did not receive dialysis (27%) (p = 0.42).Careful consideration of infection control practices throughout the dialysis process (e.g., transportation, time spent in waiting areas, spacing of machines, and cohorting), clear communication between nursing homes and dialysis centers, and coordination of testing practices between these sites are critical to preventing COVID-19 outbreaks in this medically vulnerable population.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Dialysis/adverse effects , Disease Outbreaks , Nursing Homes , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aged , Humans , Maryland/epidemiology , Pandemics
17.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(3): e20828, 2020 08 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-693311

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) can spread rapidly in nursing homes and long-term care (LTC) facilities. Symptoms-based screening and manual contact tracing have limitations that render them ineffective for containing the viral spread in LTC facilities. Symptoms-based screening alone cannot identify asymptomatic people who are infected, and the viral spread is too fast in confined living quarters to be contained by slow manual contact tracing processes. OBJECTIVE: We describe the development of a digital contact tracing system that LTC facilities can use to rapidly identify and contain asymptomatic and symptomatic SARS-CoV-2 infected contacts. A compartmental model was also developed to simulate disease transmission dynamics and to assess system performance versus conventional methods. METHODS: We developed a compartmental model parameterized specifically to assess the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) transmission in LTC facilities. The model was used to quantify the impact of asymptomatic transmission and to assess the performance of several intervention groups to control outbreaks: no intervention, symptom mapping, polymerase chain reaction testing, and manual and digital contact tracing. RESULTS: Our digital contact tracing system allows users to rapidly identify and then isolate close contacts, store and track infection data in a respiratory line listing tool, and identify contaminated rooms. Our simulation results indicate that the speed and efficiency of digital contact tracing contributed to superior control performance, yielding up to 52% fewer cases than conventional methods. CONCLUSIONS: Digital contact tracing systems show promise as an effective tool to control COVID-19 outbreaks in LTC facilities. As facilities prepare to relax restrictions and reopen to outside visitors, such tools will allow them to do so in a surgical, cost-effective manner that controls outbreaks while safely giving residents back the life they once had before this pandemic hit.


Subject(s)
Contact Tracing/methods , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Nursing Homes , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Residential Facilities , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
18.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 6(3): e21163, 2020 07 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690445

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has caused an unprecedented worldwide public health crisis that requires new management approaches. COVIDApp is a mobile app that was adapted for the management of institutionalized individuals in long-term care facilities. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this paper is to report the implementation of this innovative tool for the management of long-term care facility residents as a high-risk population, specifically for early identification and self-isolation of suspected cases, remote monitoring of mild cases, and real-time monitoring of the progression of the infection. METHODS: COVIDApp was implemented in 196 care centers in collaboration with 64 primary care teams. The following parameters of COVID-19 were reported daily: signs/symptoms; diagnosis by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction; absence of symptoms for ≥14 days; total deaths; and number of health care workers isolated with suspected COVID-19. The number of at-risk centers was also described. RESULTS: Data were recorded from 10,347 institutionalized individuals and up to 4000 health care workers between April 1 and 30, 2020. A rapid increase in suspected cases was seen until day 6 but decreased during the last two weeks (from 1084 to 282 cases). The number of confirmed cases increased from 419 (day 6) to 1293 (day 22) and remained stable during the last week. Of the 10,347 institutionalized individuals, 5,090 (49,2%) remained asymptomatic for ≥14 days. A total of 854/10,347 deaths (8.3%) were reported; 383 of these deaths (44.8%) were suspected/confirmed cases. The number of isolated health care workers remained high over the 30 days, while the number of suspected cases decreased during the last 2 weeks. The number of high-risk long-term care facilities decreased from 19/196 (9.5%) to 3/196 (1.5%). CONCLUSIONS: COVIDApp can help clinicians rapidly detect and remotely monitor suspected and confirmed cases of COVID-19 among institutionalized individuals, thus limiting the risk of spreading the virus. The platform shows the progression of infection in real time and can aid in designing new monitoring strategies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Homes for the Aged , Mobile Applications , Nursing Homes , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Aged , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Diffusion of Innovation , Humans , Long-Term Care , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Spain/epidemiology
19.
Sr Care Pharm ; 35(8): 366, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-688705

ABSTRACT

Nursing facilities have suffered the double injury of an immediate reduction in occupancy and the reputational harm of the high number of COVID-19 deaths and infections.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Humans , Nursing Homes
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