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3.
J Prof Nurs ; 46: A1-A2, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20235079
4.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 583, 2023 Jun 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245209

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Staff shortage is a long-standing issue in long term care facilities (LTCFs) that worsened with the COVID-19 outbreak. Different states in the US have employed various tools to alleviate this issue in LTCFs. We describe the actions taken by the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to assist LTCFs in addressing the staff shortage issue and their outcomes. Therefore, the main question of this study is how to create a central mechanism to allocate severely limited medical staff to healthcare centers during emergencies. METHODS: For the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, we developed a mathematical programming model to match severely limited available staff with LTCF demand requests submitted through a designed portal. To find feasible matches and prioritize facility needs, we incorporated restrictions and preferences for both sides. For staff, we considered maximum mileage they are willing to travel, available by date, and short- or long-term work preferences. For LTCFs, we considered their demand quantities for different positions and the level of urgency for their demand. As a secondary goal of this study, by using the feedback entries data received from the LTCFs on their matches, we developed statistical models to determine the most salient features that induced the LTCFs to submit feedback. RESULTS: We used the developed portal to complete about 150 matching sessions in 14 months to match staff to LTCFs in Massachusetts. LTCFs provided feedback for 2,542 matches including 2,064 intentions to hire the matched staff during this time. Further analysis indicated that nursing homes and facilities that entered higher levels of demand to the portal were more likely to provide feedback on the matches and facilities that were prioritized in the matching process due to whole facility testing or low staffing levels were less likely to do so. On the staffing side, matches that involved more experienced staff and staff who can work afternoons, evenings, and overnight were more likely to generate feedback from the facility that they were matched to. CONCLUSION: Developing a central matching framework to match medical staff to LTCFs at the time of a public health emergency could be an efficient tool for responding to staffing shortages. Such central approaches that help allocate a severely limited resource efficiently during a public emergency can be developed and used for different resource types, as well as provide crucial demand and supply information in different regions and/or demographics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Long-Term Care , Nursing Homes , Disease Outbreaks , Medical Staff
5.
BMC Geriatr ; 23(1): 343, 2023 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244601

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Regular physical activity improves physical health and mental well-being and reduces the risk of falling in older adults. The randomized controlled "Prevention by lay-assisted Outdoor-Walking in the Elderly at Risk" POWER-study investigates whether volunteer-supported outdoor-walking improves physical function and quality of life in older people living independently or in nursing homes. This sub-study explores the experiences of older participants and volunteers in relation to their physical and psychosocial well-being as well as the challenges faced by both groups. A further aim was to explore volunteers' experience with people living in nursing homes during the first pandemic lockdown (spring 2020). METHODS: The sub-study was designed as mixed-methods approach consisting of 11 individual semi-structured guide-based interviews (nursing home residents), two focus group interviews (volunteers), and a cross-sectional questionnaire survey (volunteers). The interviews were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed by content analysis as described by Kuckartz. Topics addressed in the interviews were triangulated by means of a questionnaire. The quantitative data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. RESULTS: Participants' evaluation of the intervention was generally positive. Nursing home residents appreciated the social interaction associated with the assisted walking, which motivated them to take part regularly, provided a sense of safety, and caused pleasure on both sides. The impact on physical health status of the nursing home residents of this sub-study varied to a large degree as reported in interviews: in some cases, an improvement in physical performance, a decrease in physical complaints, and an improvement in gait or independence was reported. If not, reference was made to previous or sudden illnesses and the advanced age of the participants. Despite the COVID-19-lockdown and the associated restrictions, about 60% of contacts were still possible and participants planned to continue the assisted walks after the lockdown. CONCLUSION: Volunteers have a positive effect on the quality of life, mobility, and general health of nursing home residents. Even more than the improvement of physical performance, social interaction was seen as helpful. Despite their advanced age, the nursing home residents were curious and open to new contacts. When removing the identified barriers, it might be possible to integrate this program into the long-term everyday life of nursing homes. TRIAL REGISTRATION: DRKS-ID: DRKS00015188, date of registration: 31.08.2018.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control , Nursing Homes , Walking
6.
N Engl J Med ; 388(23): 2207, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20243243
7.
Nurs Outlook ; 71(1): 101897, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2328089

ABSTRACT

For a number of decades, nurses have raised concerns about nursing-related issues in nursing homes (NH) such as inadequate registered nurse (RN) staffing, insufficient RN and advanced practice registered nurse (APRN) gerontological expertise, and lack of RN leadership competencies. The NASEM Committee on the Quality of Care in Nursing Homes illuminated the long-standing issues and concerns affecting the quality of care in nursing homes and proposed seven goals and associated recommendations intended to achieve the Committee's vision: Nursing home residents receive care in a safe environment that honors their values and preferences, addresses goals of care, promotes equity, and assesses the benefits and risks of care and treatments. This paper outlines concrete and specific actions nurses and nursing organizations can take to ensure the recommendations are implemented.


Subject(s)
Geriatrics , Nurses , Humans , Nursing Homes , Workforce , Quality of Health Care
8.
BMC Geriatr ; 23(1): 298, 2023 05 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2326787

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing homes were disproportionally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Vaccination was considered critical for the normalization of daily live of nursing home residents. The present study investigates the impact of the prolonged COVID-19 pandemic and the effect of vaccinations on the daily lives of residents and staff in Dutch nursing homes. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: The sample consisted of 78 nursing homes that participated in the Dutch national pilot on nursing home visits after the COVID-19 pandemic. One contact person per nursing home was approached for participation in this mixed-methods cross-sectional study. METHODS: Data was collected twice through questionnaires in April and December 2021. Quantitative questions focused on recent COVID-19 outbreaks, progress of vaccination, effects of vaccination on daily living in the nursing home and burden experienced by staff. Open-ended questions addressed the prolonged effect of the pandemic on residents, family members and staff. RESULTS: The overall vaccination rate of residents across nursing homes appeared to be high among both residents and staff. However, daily living in the nursing home had not returned to normal concerning personal interactions, visits, the use of facilities and work pressure. Nursing homes continued to report a negative impact of the pandemic on residents, family members and staff. CONCLUSIONS: Restrictions to the daily lives of residents in nursing homes were stricter than restrictions imposed on society as a whole. Returning to a normal daily living and working was found to be complex for nursing homes. With the emergence of new variants of the virus, policies strongly focusing on risk aversion were predominantly present in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19 Vaccines , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Nursing Homes , Vaccination
10.
Nat Aging ; 3(6): 722-733, 2023 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322588

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) vaccination has resulted in excellent protection against fatal disease, including in older adults. However, risk factors for post-vaccination fatal COVID-19 are largely unknown. We comprehensively studied three large nursing home outbreaks (20-35% fatal cases among residents) by combining severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) aerosol monitoring, whole-genome phylogenetic analysis and immunovirological profiling of nasal mucosa by digital nCounter transcriptomics. Phylogenetic investigations indicated that each outbreak stemmed from a single introduction event, although with different variants (Delta, Gamma and Mu). SARS-CoV-2 was detected in aerosol samples up to 52 d after the initial infection. Combining demographic, immune and viral parameters, the best predictive models for mortality comprised IFNB1 or age, viral ORF7a and ACE2 receptor transcripts. Comparison with published pre-vaccine fatal COVID-19 transcriptomic and genomic signatures uncovered a unique IRF3 low/IRF7 high immune signature in post-vaccine fatal COVID-19 outbreaks. A multi-layered strategy, including environmental sampling, immunomonitoring and early antiviral therapy, should be considered to prevent post-vaccination COVID-19 mortality in nursing homes.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , Phylogeny , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Nursing Homes , Vaccination , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control
11.
Br J Nurs ; 32(9): 428-432, 2023 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2319852

ABSTRACT

The UK is facing a nationwide staffing crisis within adult social care, due to difficulties in recruiting and retaining registered nurses. Current interpretation of legislation means nursing homes must always have the physical presence of a registered nurse on duty within the home. With the shortage of registered nurses increasing, reliance on agency workers is commonplace, a practice impacting service cost and continuity of care. Lack of innovation to tackle this issue means the question of how to transform service delivery to combat staffing shortages is open for debate. The potential for technology to augment the provision of care was highlighted during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article the authors present one possible solution focused on the provision of digital nursing care within nursing homes. Anticipated benefits include enhanced accessibility of nursing roles, reduced risk of viral spread and opportunities for upskilling staff. However, challenges include the current interpretation of legislation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Adult , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Nursing Homes , Workforce
12.
Nurs Open ; 10(6): 4044-4054, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316968

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to gain insight into the experiences and needs of certified nursing assistants regarding their coaching by bachelor-educated registered nurses in nursing homes. BACKGROUND: Certified nursing assistants are key in providing day-to-day nursing home care. They are, however, not trained to meet the increasingly complex needs of nursing home residents. For certified nursing assistants to respond to high-complexity care, coaching by bachelor-educated registered nurses may be appropriate. Yet, knowledge of how bachelor-educated registered nurses can provide valid coaching is lacking. DESIGN: An explorative qualitative design was adopted. METHODS: Certified nursing assistants (n = 13) were purposively selected from 10 Dutch nursing homes. Semi-structured interviews were conducted in 2020 and 2021, and thematic analysis was applied. RESULTS: Two main themes emerged: connecting with certified nursing assistants, and the coaching activities themselves. Certified nursing assistants deemed several aspects important for bachelor-educated registered nurses to connect with them: respecting the autonomy of certified nursing assistants, being visible and reachable, adapting communication, clarifying own job description, and participating in care. Certified nursing assistants perceived coaching by bachelor-educated registered nurses as valuable when they fulfil their needs through activities such as empowering, teaching, and mediating between management and certified nursing assistants. CONCLUSIONS: Valid coaching of certified nursing assistants appears possible and requires specific competencies of bachelor-educated registered nurses. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Coaching certified nursing assistants is one way of addressing complex care needs in nursing homes, and coaching can contribute to both professional and team development. As coaching requires specific competencies of bachelor-educated registered nurses, nursing education profiles should be enriched with this most important role. Management can facilitate coaching by providing bachelor-educated registered nurses with a clear job description. PATIENT OR PUBLIC CONTRIBUTION: Experts on coaching in nursing home settings informed the topic list. Furthermore, member check was performed.


Subject(s)
Mentoring , Nurses , Nursing Assistants , Humans , Nursing Homes , Qualitative Research
13.
BMJ ; 381: e074778, 2023 05 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2316683

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the risks of any menstrual disturbance and bleeding following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in women who are premenopausal or postmenopausal. DESIGN: A nationwide, register based cohort study. SETTING: All inpatient and specialised outpatient care in Sweden from 27 December 2020 to 28 February 2022. A subset covering primary care for 40% of the Swedish female population was also included. PARTICIPANTS: 2 946 448 Swedish women aged 12-74 years were included. Pregnant women, women living in nursing homes, and women with history of any menstruation or bleeding disorders, breast cancer, cancer of female genital organs, or who underwent a hysterectomy between 1 January 2015 and 26 December 2020 were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: SARS-CoV-2 vaccination, by vaccine product (BNT162b2, mRNA-1273, or ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 (AZD1222)) and dose (unvaccinated and first, second, and third dose) over two time windows (one to seven days, considered the control period, and 8-90 days). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Healthcare contact (admission to hospital or visit) for menstrual disturbance or bleeding before or after menopause (diagnosed with the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems, Tenth Revision codes N91, N92, N93, N95). RESULTS: 2 580 007 (87.6%) of 2 946 448 women received at least one SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and 1 652 472 (64.0%) 2 580 007 of vaccinated women received three doses before the end of follow-up. The highest risks for bleeding in women who were postmenopausal were observed after the third dose, in the one to seven days risk window (hazard ratio 1.28 (95% confidence interval 1.01 to 1.62)) and in the 8-90 days risk window (1.25 (1.04 to 1.50)). The impact of adjustment for covariates was modest. Risk of postmenopausal bleeding suggested a 23-33% increased risk after 8-90 days with BNT162b2 and mRNA-1273 after the third dose, but the association with ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 was less clear. For menstrual disturbance or bleeding in women who were premenopausal, adjustment for covariates almost completely removed the weak associations noted in the crude analyses. CONCLUSIONS: Weak and inconsistent associations were observed between SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and healthcare contacts for bleeding in women who are postmenopausal, and even less evidence was recorded of an association for menstrual disturbance or bleeding in women who were premenopausal. These findings do not provide substantial support for a causal association between SARS-CoV-2 vaccination and healthcare contacts related to menstrual or bleeding disorders.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , ChAdOx1 nCoV-19 , Pregnancy , Female , Humans , BNT162 Vaccine , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , SARS-CoV-2 , 2019-nCoV Vaccine mRNA-1273 , Cohort Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Menopause , Hemorrhage/epidemiology , Menstruation Disturbances , Nursing Homes , Vaccination/adverse effects
14.
Dtsch Arztebl Int ; 120(9): 142-143, 2023 Mar 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2315339
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2313194

ABSTRACT

Cognitive impairment in older adults is associated with poor gait performance, physical decline, falls and poor quality of life. This paper analyzes the feasibility and efficacy of tango-based intervention in older people living in nursing homes with and without cognitive impairment. A multicenter study, with pre- and post-test, was carried out. Intervention attendance, well-being, physical abilities (short physical performance battery), walking performance, functional capacities (Katz Index) and quality of life (quality of life in Alzheimer's disease) were assessed. Fifty-four participants (84.9 ± 6.7 years, mini mental state examination 14.5 ± 7.4) completed the protocol. Intervention attendance was 92%, and the mean subjective well-being after each session was 4.5 ± 0.5 (on a five-point scale). A statistically significant improvement was found in the quality of life (p = 0.030). Non-statistically significant changes were found in walking performance (p = 0.159), physical abilities (p = 0.876) and in functional capacities (p = 0.253). This study shows feasibility and suggests evidence for the effects of tango therapy on well-being and quality of life. Further studies are necessary to contrast these findings and to support the role of tango interventions as a holistic approach to prevent functional decline in older people with cognitive impairment.


Subject(s)
Cognitive Dysfunction , Quality of Life , Humans , Aged , Gait , Nursing Homes , Walking
16.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 72(18): 493-496, 2023 May 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2312239

ABSTRACT

The National Center for Health Statistics' (NCHS) National Vital Statistics System (NVSS) collects and reports annual mortality statistics using U.S. death certificate data. Provisional data, which are based on the current flow of death certificate data to NCHS, provide an early estimate of deaths before the release of final data.* This report summarizes provisional U.S. COVID-19 death data for 2022. In 2022, COVID-19 was the underlying (primary) or contributing cause in the chain of events leading to 244,986 deaths† that occurred in the United States. During 2021-2022, the estimated age-adjusted COVID-19-associated death rate decreased 47%, from 115.6 to 61.3 per 100,000 persons. COVID-19 death rates were highest among persons aged ≥85 years, non-Hispanic American Indian or Alaska Native (AI/AN) populations, and males. In 76% of deaths with COVID-19 listed on the death certificate, COVID-19 was listed as the underlying cause of death. In the remaining 24% of COVID-19 deaths, COVID-19 was a contributing cause. As in 2020 and 2021, during 2022, the most common location of COVID-19 deaths was a hospital inpatient setting (59%). However, an increasing percentage occurred in the decedent's home (15%), or a nursing home or long-term care facility (14%).§ Provisional COVID-19 death estimates provide an early indication of shifts in mortality trends and can help guide public health policies and interventions aimed at reducing COVID-19-associated mortality.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Male , Humans , United States/epidemiology , Cause of Death , Population Surveillance , Nursing Homes , Mortality
17.
Nat Aging ; 2(9): 767-769, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2314336
18.
Semergen ; 48(5): 334-343, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2307607

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe interventions included in the implementation of a multidisciplinary Geriatrics Program that gives support to nursing homes, in coordination with Primary Care and Public Health, in collaboration with other hospital departments. METHODS: An observational descriptive study was conducted in an area that includes 60 nursing homes with nearly 4600 residents from June 1 st, 2020 to October 1 st, 2021. The program consists of different interventions including Telemedicine and support of a Geriatric Consultation Liaison Team. An estimation of avoided costs through these interventions was carried out. RESULTS: The activity recorded was 11502 telephone calls, 2247 e-mails, 313 visits to these centres in where 4085 patients underwent comprehensive geriatric assessment. During this period of time 442 patients received intravenous therapy in their nursing homes, including 7541 different types of medication which 5850 of them were antibiotics. According to the Diagnosis-related-Group (DRG) of the patients that received intravenous treatment in their nursing homes, was estimated a cost reduction of 1,500,00€ and a total of 2800 days of hospital stay avoided. In the group of 198 patients that received video consultation was estimated reduction of costs of 37,026€. A hospital multidisciplinary care team focused on the nursing home patients was created. CONCLUSIONS: This program improves continuity of nursing homes patients care and to enhance communication and coordination among Primary Care, Hospitals and Public Health services and secondarily, reducing hospital costs.


Subject(s)
Geriatric Assessment , Nursing Homes , Aged , Community Health Services , Humans , Patient Care Team , Primary Health Care
19.
J Am Med Dir Assoc ; 24(7): 1042-1047.e1, 2023 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308095

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To examine the practice patterns and trends of long-term care (LTC) physicians between 2019 and 2021 in Ontario, Canada. DESIGN: Population-level descriptive time trend study. SETTING AND PARTICIPANTS: Most responsible physicians (MRPs) of LTC residents of publicly funded LTC homes in Ontario, Canada, from September 2019 to December 2021. METHODS: We examined the number of MRPs in publicly regulated Ontario LTC homes before and during the COVID-19 pandemic using population-level administrative databases. Characteristics of MRPs and practice patterns were generated at baseline and across distinct time periods of the pandemic in descriptive tables. We created a Sankey diagram to visualize MRP practice changes over time. RESULTS: More than one-quarter of pre-pandemic MRPs were no longer MRPs by the end of 2021, although most continued to practice in non-LTC settings. There was a decrease from 1444 to 1266 MRPs over time. Other characteristics of MRPs remained stable over the pandemic time periods. At baseline, LTC physicians were MRP for an average of 57.3 residents. By the end of 2021, this caseload decreased to 53.3 residents per MRP. MRPs increasingly billed monthly management compensation fees over the fee-for-service model across the pandemic time periods. The number of MRPs working in an LTC home shifted to fewer MRPs per home. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: MRP demographic characteristics did not change over the course of the pandemic. The observed shifts in practice patterns showed a reduction in the overall LTC MRP workforce, who delivered care to fewer residents on average in LTC homes with fewer colleagues to rely on. Future work can study how changes to LTC MRPs' practice patterns impact physician coverage, access and continuity of care, and health services and quality outcomes among residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Physicians , Humans , Long-Term Care , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Nursing Homes , Workforce
20.
Soc Sci Med ; 327: 115799, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2308021

ABSTRACT

The nursing home sector was disproportionally affected by the COVID-19 pandemic and consequently, extreme mitigation strategies were taken in order to halt the spread of the virus. This research scrutinizes the manifestations of organizational trauma and healing amongst nursing home employees during the slow-burning pandemic. We aim to advance the contemporary debate around organizational healing that exclusively investigates fast-burning crises by translating these theories to a slow-burning crisis. Using participatory action research, we conducted two months of visual ethnographic fieldwork in a small-scale nursing home located in Amsterdam, the Netherlands from October to December 2021. Here, we present our findings constituting text and short videos according to the following four themes: (1) Emotional challenges in the workplace; (2) Cultural incompatibility of infection control strategies; (3) Navigating the ethics of decision-making; and (4) Organizational scars and healing perspectives. We propose the new concept of trauma distillation to describe and analyse how simmering organizational wounds are re-opened and purified to trigger a prolonged healing process in the context of slow-burning crises. Ultimately, this may lead to the acknowledgement and acceptance of such organizational wounds as multi-layered and intractable, aiming for a theoretical and empirical understanding of how to heal these. Our use of visual methods offers employees the opportunity to share their stories, make their suffering heard, and may contribute to nursing homes' processes of healing.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Pandemics , Nursing Homes , Anthropology, Cultural , Netherlands
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