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3.
J Neurosci Nurs ; 53(5): 193, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1483578
4.
Int J Nurs Stud ; 109: 103658, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1454195

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing literature frequently emphasises the benefits of person-centred approaches for healthcare quality and safety. OBJECTIVE: This umbrella review aimed to synthesise the combined evidence from systematic reviews assessing the impact of person-centred care interventions on patient safety. DESIGN: A three-step review process included a preliminary review of literature, a comprehensive search, and manual searching of reference lists and forward citations of selected reviews. The review protocol was registered with Prospero (CRD42018090048). DATA SOURCES: Reviewers searched 10 databases for systematic reviews published in English-language peer-reviewed journals between 2000 and 2019: Academic Search Complete, CINAHL, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, JBI Database, Medline, ProQuest Health & Medicine, PROSPERO Register, PubMed and Scopus. REVIEW METHODS: Covidence software was used to manage screening and eligibility. Two reviewers independently screened titles and abstracts, reviewed full texts of articles for eligibility, and appraised the quality of reviews using the JBI Critical Appraisal Checklist for Systematic Reviews and Research Syntheses. RESULTS: From an initial total of 3412 potential titles, 16 reviews met the inclusion criteria. The selected reviews examined the impact of person-centred care for diverse groups of patients (children, adults and older people) in varied settings. Most systematic reviews assessed experimental studies, generally comparing person-centred interventions with 'usual care', often demonstrating limited evidence of impact on safety. Reviews addressed several patient safety outcomes relevant to nursing, including falls, infections, medication use and misuse, and mortality rates. The systematic reviews were generally well conducted, although several included studies of poor or fair quality. Given the heterogeneity of the interventions, outcomes and research designs of studies included in the selected reviews, we were unable to draw unequivocal conclusions about the implications of person-centred care for patient safety in this umbrella review. However, there was some encouraging evidence that person-centred care initiatives may result in reduced rates of falls (in acute care and residential aged care settings). The review also highlighted reductions in agitation for people with dementia and some improvement in anti-psychotic medication use in older people with dementia. CONCLUSIONS: Although abundant evidence exists demonstrating the positive effects of person-centred care on healthcare quality and on patient (and provider) wellbeing, there is little research focussing specifically on the impact of person-centred care on patient safety. Thus, there is scope for further high-quality nursing research into how person-centred interventions improve specific patient safety outcomes in order to inform more widespread adoption of person-centred practice.


Subject(s)
Nursing Research , Adult , Aged , Child , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Patient Safety , Patient-Centered Care , Systematic Reviews as Topic
5.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(Sup10): S6-S15, 2021 Oct 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1431158

ABSTRACT

Management of secondary head and neck lymphoedema has undergone little research investigation. Its treatment is time and labour intensive and involves multiple therapeutic modalities without a clear understanding of which is most effective. This study aimed to determine the feasibility of a randomised controlled trial comparing two therapeutic modalities to manage head and neck lymphoedema. The secondary objective was to evaluate the clinical effects of these treatments. Participants were randomised to receive treatment with manual lymphatic drainage or compression over 6 weeks, with the primary outcome-percentage tissue water-measured 12 weeks after treatment. Six participants were recruited until the study was ceased due to restrictions imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic. Some 86% of required attendances were completed. Percentage tissue water increased in all participants at 12 weeks. No consistent trends were identified between internal and external lymphoedema. The small number of people recruited to this study informs its feasibility outcomes but limits any conclusions about clinical implications.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphedema , Nursing Research , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Compression Bandages , Feasibility Studies , Head , Humans , Lymphedema/nursing , Manual Lymphatic Drainage , Neck , Nursing Research/organization & administration , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom/epidemiology
7.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(7-8): 364-365, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361820

ABSTRACT

Nursing has been pandemic-slammed. Although 2020 will be forever entangled with the COVID-19 pandemic, we, as nurse leaders, must continue to move forward and beyond this endemic challenge. We cannot lose focus on generating new knowledge to continue nursing excellence and move our profession forward.


Subject(s)
Leadership , Nursing Research , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Rev. baiana enferm ; 34: e37107, 2020. tab, graf
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1328339

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: analisar a produção científica brasileira sobre a COVID-19. Método: pesquisa bibliográfica, descritiva, quantitativa e de análise bibliométrica. A fonte de informação foi a PubMed, com recorte temporal entre 17 de novembro 2019 e 18 de maio 2020. Foram utilizados para a análise dos dados os softwares RSudio e VOSviewer, os pacotes bibliométricos bibliometrix e biblioshiny, e o site Word Cloud Art. Resultados: os autores brasileiros identificados nos 248 artigos são, em sua maioria, da área da medicina, atuando em instituições nas Regiões Sudeste e Nordeste do Brasil e mantêm colaboração internacional, principalmente entre os Estados Unidos, Itália e Canadá. Há publicação em diversos periódicos, com destaque para os de origem brasileira. As palavras-chave e os artigos publicados remetem às temáticas biomédicas. Conclusão: a produção científica brasileira carece de pesquisas sobre a COVID-19 que reflitam sobre os impactos da pandemia para a sociedade, os trabalhadores e a economia da saúde no Brasil.


Objetivo: analizar la producción científica brasileña en COVID-19. Método: investigación bibliográfica, descriptiva, cuantitativa y de análisis bibliométrico. La fuente de información fue PubMed, con un periodo entre el 17 de noviembre de 2019 y el 18 de mayo de 2020. Para el análisis de datos, se utilizaron el software RSudio y VOSviewer, los paquetes bibliométricos bibliometrix y biblioshiny, y Word Cloud Art. Resultados: los autores brasileños identificados en los 248 artículos son en su mayoría del área de la medicina, trabajando en instituciones en las regiones sureste y noreste de Brasil y mantienen la colaboración internacional, principalmente entre los Estados Unidos, Italia y Canadá. Hay publicación en varias revistas, especialmente las de origen brasileño. Las palabras clave y los artículos publicados se refieren a temas biomédicos. Conclusión: la producción científica brasileña carece de investigaciones sobre COVID-19 que reflexionen sobre los impactos de la pandemia en la sociedad, los trabajadores y la economía de la salud en Brasil.


Objective: to analyze the Brazilian scientific production on COVID-19. Method: bibliographic, descriptive, quantitative and bibliometric analysis research. The source of information was PubMed, with a period between November 17, 2019 and May 18, 2020. RSudio and VOSviewer software, bibliometrix and biblioshiny bibliometric packages, and Word Cloud Art were used for data analysis. Results: the Brazilian authors identified in the 248 articles are mostly from the medical area, working in institutions in the Southeast and Northeast regions of Brazil and maintain international collaboration, mainly with the United States, Italy and Canada. There is publication in several journals, especially those of Brazilian origin. The keywords and published articles refer to biomedical themes. Conclusion: Brazilian scientific production lacks researches on COVID-19 that reflect on the impacts of the pandemic on society, workers and health economy in Brazil.


Subject(s)
Humans , Bibliometrics , Coronavirus Infections , Scientific and Technical Publications , Data Analysis , Nursing Research , Information Dissemination , Nursing Informatics
10.
Nurs Forum ; 56(4): 950-970, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327586

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In the COVID-19 pandemic, many people experienced temporal boundedness in different ways (e.g., home, country, persons, and rules). However, being bound is also a permanent experience for chronically ill or handicapped people with sometimes serious consequences. To be able to recognize the phenomenon, a clear definition is necessary. In the literature, though, boundedness shows up as a very multifaceted phenomenon. OBJECTIVES: Exploring and conceptualizing the phenomenon of boundedness taking into account the various forms and the consequences for nursing. METHODS: A scoping review using the framework of Arksey and O'Malley and the PRISMA statement (PRISMA-ScR) to verify the fullness of the review. DATA SOURCES: Online dictionaries and theoretical and empirical publications in CINAHL, Medline via PubMed, PsycINFO, PsycArticles, Scopus, WISO. A total of 34 sources were included. RESULTS: Boundedness as a contextual concept is ambiguous. There are three basic causes: an acquired condition, personal obligations, arranged conditions, two principal courses: enduring and temporary, and seven types of being bound: to one or more person(s), to a place/position, to/in an object, to thoughts/opinions, to activities, to/in substances and to time. Examples of types are bedbound, culture-bound, homebound, time-bound, wheelchair-bound and are particularly relevant for care. The consequences are manifold, physically, as well as mentally, and socially. CONCLUSION: To reduce or avoid the burdens caused by boundedness, the concept must be implemented in nursing education and nursing practice. To this end, nursing research must further specify the types of boundedness in concept analyses and develop suitable interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing , Nursing Research , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Res Nurs Health ; 44(5): 758-766, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318734

ABSTRACT

With the recent impact by the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing research has gone through unexpected changes across the globe. The purpose of this special report is to present the commonalities in the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing research across four countries, including the United States, South Korea, Japan, and Taiwan, and one region, that is, Hong Kong, and to make recommendations for future nursing research during the immediate postpandemic period and future pandemic situations. To identify the commonalities, seven researchers/leaders from the five countries/regions had discussions through 3 days of an international workshop. The content for this discussion paper derived from: (a) the exemplars/cases of the COVID-19 impact on the research process, (b) researchers/leaders' presentations on the COVID-19 impact, and (c) memos from the workshop. The materials were analyzed using a simple content analysis. The commonalities included: (a) "a heavy emphasis on teaching and fluctuating productivity," (b) "increased funding opportunities and governmental support," (c) "gendered experience complicated by professional differences," (d) "delays and changes/modifications in research process," (e) "limited research settings and difficulties in getting access," and (f) "increased online dissemination activities with positive changes in the image of nursing." With all collective wisdom that nurse researchers have obtained during the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing research will evolve again for the successful future of the nursing discipline.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Research/trends , Hong Kong , Humans , Japan , Republic of Korea , Taiwan , United States
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(13)2021 06 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many countries around the world are currently threatened by the COVID-19 pandemic, and nurses are facing increasing responsibilities and work demands related to infection control. To establish a developmental strategy for infection control, it is important to analyze, understand, or visualize the accumulated data gathered from research in the field of nursing. METHODS: A total of 4854 articles published between 1978 and 2017 were retrieved from the Web of Science. Abstracts from these articles were extracted, and network analysis was conducted using the semantic network module. RESULTS: 'wound', 'injury', 'breast', "dressing", 'temperature', 'drainage', 'diabetes', 'abscess', and 'cleaning' were identified as the keywords with high values of degree centrality, betweenness centrality, and closeness centrality; hence, they were determined to be influential in the network. The major topics were 'PLWH' (people living with HIV), 'pregnancy', and 'STI' (sexually transmitted infection). CONCLUSIONS: Diverse infection research has been conducted on the topics of blood-borne infections, sexually transmitted infections, respiratory infections, urinary tract infections, and bacterial infections. STIs (including HIV), pregnancy, and bacterial infections have been the focus of particularly intense research by nursing researchers. More research on viral infections, urinary tract infections, immune topic, and hospital-acquired infections will be needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , HIV Infections , Nursing Research , Sexually Transmitted Diseases , Female , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Semantic Web , Sexually Transmitted Diseases/epidemiology
13.
Nurs Sci Q ; 34(3): 234, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1295349

ABSTRACT

Consideration of the idea of diversity of knowledge is the subject of this column since it is meant as an introduction to the article about recruitment strategies in minority populations during Covid-19.


Subject(s)
Cultural Diversity , Knowledge , Humans , Nursing Research
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(12)2021 06 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282457

ABSTRACT

Using social media is one important strategy to communicate research and public health guidelines to the scientific community and general public. Empirical evidence about which communication strategies are effective around breastfeeding messaging is scarce. To fill this gap, we aimed to identify influencers in the largest available Twitter database using social network analysis (n = 10,694 users), inductively analyze tweets, and explore communication strategies, motivations, and challenges via semi-structured interviews. Influencers had diverse backgrounds within and beyond the scientific health community (SHC; 42.7%): 54.7% were from the general public and 3% were companies. SHC contributed to most of the tweets (n = 798 tweets), disseminating guidelines and research findings more frequently than others (p < 0.001). Influencers from the general community mostly tweeted opinions regarding the current state of breastfeeding research and advocacy. Interviewees provided practical strategies (e.g., preferred visuals, tone, and writing style) to achieve personal and societal goals including career opportunities, community support, and improved breastfeeding practices. Complex challenges that need to be addressed were identified. Ideological differences regarding infant feeding may be hampering constructive communication, including differences in influencers' interpretation of the WHO International Code of Marketing of Breast-milk Substitutes and in perspectives regarding which social media interactions encompass conflict of interest.


Subject(s)
Nursing Research , Social Media , Breast Feeding , Communication , Female , Humans , Social Network Analysis
15.
Creat Nurs ; 27(2): 118-124, 2021 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1229100

ABSTRACT

University of California San Diego Health was set to launch its 13th annual Nursing and Inquiry Innovation Conference event in June 2020. However, the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic placed a barrier to large gatherings throughout the world. Because the World Health Organization designated 2020 as the Year of the Nurse and Midwife, the University committed to continuing the large-scale conference, converting to a virtual event. This article reviews the methodologies behind the delivery of the virtual event and implications for user engagement and learning on the blended electronic platform.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Congresses as Topic/organization & administration , Nursing Research , User-Computer Interface , California/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Oncol Nurs Forum ; 48(2): 131-145, 2021 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192550

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To identify research priorities addressing COVID-19 that build on the 2019-2022 Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Research Agenda, in alignment with ONS's mission to promote excellence in oncology nursing and quality cancer care. METHODS & VARIABLES: Priority areas were identified using a multistep approach combining rapid review of the literature; consultation with experts/stakeholders; and review of priorities from other funding agencies, public health, and cancer-focused organizations. RESULTS: The rapid research response team identified five priority areas for research related to COVID-19. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING: Oncology nurses are well positioned to address the research priorities and cross-cutting themes identified through this review. The use of innovative methodologic approaches and attention to disparities are necessary to advance cancer care related to COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Neoplasms/nursing , Nursing Research , Oncology Nursing , Societies, Nursing , Humans
18.
Br J Community Nurs ; 26(4): 190-194, 2021 Apr 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1175772

ABSTRACT

Social distancing has reduced the amount of touch in everyday life. This article summarises the current state of knowledge regarding the biological underpinnings of touch, varied preferences for touch, including cultural norms, and its potential psychological and physical benefits for recipients. The lack of nursing research and related evidence are noted, and suggestions are made regarding the use of consensual touch as part of non-verbal communication within community nursing practice to express compassion and help build authentic relationships between nurses and their clients.


Subject(s)
Nurse-Patient Relations , Nurses , Empathy , Humans , Knowledge , Nurses/psychology , Nurses/trends , Nursing Research , Physical Distancing , Touch
19.
J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 36(6): 599-608, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1174977

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: ActiGraph accelerometry is widely used in nursing research to estimate daily physical activity. Heart rate variability (HRV), a measure of autonomic modulation, can be assessed in conjunction with the ActiGraph using a Polar H7 Bluetooth heart rate monitor. There is a paucity of nursing literature to guide nurse researchers' protocol development when using the ActiGraph to assess both physical activity and short-term HRV via its Bluetooth capabilities. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to describe a standardized research ActiGraph and HRV (ActiGraph HRV) protocol for an ongoing randomized controlled trial to measure physical activity and short-term HRV in patients with ischemic heart disease who report hopelessness. METHODS: We outline the study protocol for the standardization of reliable and rigorous physical activity and HRV data collection using the ActiGraph wGT3X-BT and Polar H7 Bluetooth heart rate monitor, and data analysis using ActiLife and Kubios software programs. RESULTS: Sixty-four participants enrolled in the randomized controlled trial to date, and 45 (70.3%) have completed or are actively participating in the study. Heart rate variability data have been collected on 43 of the 45 participants (96%) to date. During the first data collection time point, 42 of 44 participants (95.5%) wore the ActiGraph for a minimum of 5 valid days, followed by 28 of 31 participants (90.3%) and 25 of 26 participants (96.2%) at subsequent data collection time points. The intraclass correlation for physical activity in this study is 0.95 and 0.98 for HRV. DISCUSSION: Revisions to the protocol were successfully implemented at the onset of the COVID-19 pandemic for data collection using social distancing. The protocol was additionally amended in response to an unanticipated problem with ActiGraph battery life using Bluetooth technology. Use of the ActiGraph HRV protocol has led to a reliable and rigorous measurement of physical activity and HRV for patients with ischemic heart disease who report hopelessness in this randomized controlled trial. CONCLUSION: We provide an ActiGraph HRV protocol that can be adapted as a model in the development of ActiGraph HRV protocols for future nursing research in community and home-based settings while maximizing social distancing in the current and future pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Research , Heart Rate , Humans , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Res Nurs Health ; 44(3): 420-421, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1148845
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