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1.
Health Aff (Millwood) ; 41(5): 751-759, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1808581

ABSTRACT

Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, nursing home residents have accounted for roughly one of every six COVID-19 deaths in the United States. Nursing homes have also been very dangerous places for workers, with more than one million nursing home workers testing positive for COVID-19 as of April 2022. Labor unions may play an important role in improving workplace safety, with potential benefits for both nursing home workers and residents. We examined whether unions for nursing home staff were associated with lower resident COVID-19 mortality rates and worker COVID-19 infection rates compared with rates in nonunion nursing homes, using proprietary data on nursing home-level union status from the Service Employees International Union for all forty-eight continental US states from June 8, 2020, through March 21, 2021. Using negative binomial regression and adjusting for potential confounders, we found that unions were associated with 10.8 percent lower resident COVID-19 mortality rates, as well as 6.8 percent lower worker COVID-19 infection rates. Substantive results were similar, although sometimes smaller and less precisely estimated, in sensitivity analyses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Humans , Nursing Homes , Pandemics , Skilled Nursing Facilities , United States/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(7)2022 04 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1776237

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 posed enormous challenges for nursing home staff, which may have caused stress and mental health problems. This study aimed to measure the prevalence of mental health problems among nursing home staff and investigate the differences in job demands, work functioning and mental health between staff with and without COVID contact or COVID infection and across different levels of COVID worries. In this cross-sectional study, 1669 employees from 10 nursing home organizations filled in an online questionnaire between June and September 2020. The questionnaire measured the participants' characteristics, COVID contact, infection and worries, job demands, work functioning, depressive symptoms and burnout. Differences were investigated with multilevel models to account for clustering at the organization level. Of the participants, 19.1% had high levels of depressive symptoms and 22.2% burnout. Job demands, work functioning, depressive symptoms and burnout differed between participants who never worried and participants who often or always worried about the COVID crisis. Differences were smaller for participants with and without COVID contact or infection. Most models improved when clustering was accounted for. Nursing homes should be aware of the impact of COVID worries on job demands, work functioning and mental health, both at the individual and organizational level.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Mental Health , Nursing Homes , Nursing Staff/psychology
3.
BMJ Open ; 12(4): e056742, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1774964

ABSTRACT

AIMS AND OBJECTIVES: To explore what wellbeing means to medical and nursing staff working in a large paediatric intensive care (PIC). DESIGN: Exploratory qualitative design using an appreciative inquiry framework. SETTING: PIC unit; primary, secondary and tertiary. PARTICIPANTS: 46 nurses and doctors working on PIC. INTERVENTIONS: A set of images were used together with open-ended questions to prompt staff to discuss what wellbeing means to them. Interviews were audiorecorded and transcribed. Data were analysed thematically. RESULTS: Images depicting nature, children and groups of adults were selected most. Meanings of wellbeing for PIC staff can be understood through three themes: (1) Being nurtured and supported at work, (2) Importance of nature and (3) Social support independent of work. The first theme considered the importance of being listened to at work as well as staff highlighting the value of being in control at work. Within the second theme, being active in nature and outdoors as well as the importance of being in the present moment was illustrated. Within the final theme, staff expressed the value of having support independent of work and highlighted the importance of spending time with family. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides a unique insight into how individuals working in PIC experience wellbeing and what wellbeing means to them. Understanding how healthcare professionals in PIC settings experience wellbeing and what wellbeing means to them will enable researchers to develop interventions designed to enhance staff wellbeing based on lived experience.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff , Physicians , Adult , Child , Critical Care , Health Personnel , Humans , Qualitative Research
4.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(4): 194-196, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1764701

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic exacerbated long-standing challenges in the workforce, resulting in a shortage of nurses that has now reached crisis levels. At the same time, there is a concerning "skills gap" that has been emerging for some time. Leaders have typically relied on legacy recruitment and retention strategies to mitigate these challenges, but these will not be sufficient to address staffing gaps. In this article, the authors discuss how current staffing challenges differ from previous workforce shortages and propose 7 executive strategies for C-suite leaders to prepare for the future nursing workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Humans , Pandemics , Workforce
5.
Comput Inform Nurs ; 40(5): 307-316, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1735676

ABSTRACT

Healthcare providers without working experience in isolation wards experience enormous challenges. Traditional ward orientation is constrained by space, time, and even infection risk in particular periods (eg, the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic). Virtual reality has been used widely, but rarely in wards. This study aimed to explore the experience of utilizing virtual reality for isolation ward training among nurses. In this study, nurses completed virtual reality training via an online platform and were then trained in isolation wards, after which their perceptions were explored by questionnaire and interviews. A total of 1868 participants completed the training. Most participants thought the preservice training was important and believed the virtual reality experience was consistent with the in-person training. Virtual reality was found not only to be convenient and valuable for training but also to have the benefits of occupational protection. However, whereas 50.48% of participants wanted to learn the ward via virtual reality, 87.21% of participants wanted to learn via in-person training before working in the wards. As a substitute for in-person training, virtual reality is a feasible and practical instrument to provide preservice training in particular periods. However, there is room for improvement due to general discomfort and technological problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Virtual Reality , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pilot Projects
6.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 1-20, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1696701

ABSTRACT

Nurses experience high levels of burnout, and this has become a major factor in recruitment and retention of nurses. Several factors have been associated with burnout, but it is not clear which factors are the most significant predictors. Understanding the most prevalent factors that are associated with burnout will allow for the development and implementation of interventions to ameliorate and/or reduce burnout in the nursing workforce.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nurses , Nursing Staff , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
Nurs Open ; 9(3): 1744-1756, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1707647

ABSTRACT

AIM: To describe the state of health of Quebec nursing staff during the pandemic according to their exposure to COVID-19, work-related characteristics and sociodemographic factors (gender, generational age group). State of health was captured essentially by assessing psychological distress, depression symptoms and fatigue. DESIGN AND METHODS: A large-scale cross-sectional study was conducted with 1,708 nurses and licenced practical nurses in Quebec (87% women, mean age of 41 ± 11 years). The survey included several questionnaires and validated health-related scales (psychological distress, depression symptoms and fatigue). The STROBE guidelines were followed in reporting the study's findings. RESULTS: Results showed that the prevalence of psychological distress and depression symptoms was moderate to severe. Women, generation Xers and Yers, nurses who cared for COVID-19 patients and those with a colleague who was infected with COVID-19 at work scored higher for fatigue, psychological distress and depression.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Psychological Distress , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 11, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1684814

ABSTRACT

Acknowledging underlying inequities is crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Health Status Disparities , Nursing Staff/psychology , Resilience, Psychological , Female , Humans
9.
Am J Nurs ; 122(2): 18-20, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672278
10.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 11, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672272

ABSTRACT

Frontline workers deserve protection and follow-up support.


Subject(s)
Armed Conflicts , COVID-19/mortality , Language , Metaphor , Nursing Staff/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Mental Health , Nursing Staff/supply & distribution
11.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 38(1): 24-29, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1672406

ABSTRACT

As COVID-19 placed unprecedented demands on healthcare systems across the country, nurses were deployed to care for severely ill patients in acute and intensive care units at rates never imagined. Especially challenging for nursing staff was being witness to patients' deaths daily. This article describes the implementation and outcomes of an innovative initiative entitled Gentle Hands, in which a nurse educator team performed postmortem care for unit nurses during a COVID-19 hospital surge.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Faculty, Nursing , Humans , Intensive Care Units , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Hosp Palliat Nurs ; 24(2): 132-139, 2022 Apr 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1642435

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created a global health crisis. Novel and intolerable pressures have been placed upon nurses affecting their capacity to provide care. The aim of this exploratory study was to determine the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nursing care delivery, the empathetic response of nurses to their patients and family members, and the emotional and physical well-being of the nurses. Four frontline nurses were interviewed while in the midst of the pandemic. Common themes emerged from analysis of the nurses' narratives and included changes in role, increased workload, depersonalized and mechanical care delivery, communication challenges with patient and family members, deficits in palliative care education, perceived poor administrative support, and physical/emotional exhaustion. Clinical leaders and nursing staff have opportunities to engage in supportive endeavors, which can restore focus and regain positive perceptions, strengthen coping skills, and deliver palliative care education in response to the ongoing challenges and stressors created by the COVID-19 pandemic. Together, they can build resilience in frontline nurses and ultimately impact delivery of compassionate and empathetic care to patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload
13.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 43: e20210007, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1635238

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To know the perceptions of nursing professionals in urgent and emergency services regarding workloads and the relationship with their health. METHOD: Descriptive qualitative study carried out in two urgent and emergency sectors in southern Brazil. 16 nursing professionals were interviewed. The data were subjected to thematic content analysis. RESULTS: The first thematic category highlighted the workloads in the daily lives of professionals, highlighting Covid-19 as an element recently incorporated into the perception of biological load. The psychic load is enhanced by stress and suffering in the face of deaths, in addition to adverse working conditions. The second category showed the interface between the loads, the overload and the workers' health, highlighting the importance of the psychic load in mental health. CONCLUSION: Workloads are enhanced by working conditions and the relationship with the profession's work object, generating overload and risk of mental illness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Nursing , Nursing Staff , Brazil , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Workload
14.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 34(4): 103-112, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1631898

ABSTRACT

Given the nursing shortage, nurse educators and leaders are responsible now more than ever to advocate for baccalaureate education as an entry-to-practice requirement for registered nurses. The world today is complex, with population health issues stemming from the COVID-19 pandemic, high patient acuity and climate change. Accordingly, a nursing workforce that receives high-quality education is required. In this paper, an overview is provided about the evolution of a baccalaureate degree in nursing as an entry-to-practice requirement. We highlight evidence about patient outcomes associated with baccalaureate-prepared nurses, identify gaps and examine the nature of workplace environments in optimizing contributions stemming from baccalaureate-prepared nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate , Nursing Staff , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Br J Community Nurs ; 27(1): 5, 2022 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1625903
16.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 7, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1605755

ABSTRACT

Optimism that the pandemic would be over was short lived.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19 , Nursing Staff/supply & distribution , Optimism , COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans
19.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260594, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546960

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine can be used to conduct ophthalmological assessment of patients, facilitating patient access to specialist care. Since the teleophthalmology models require data collection support from other health professionals, the purpose of our study was to assess agreement between the nursing technician and the ophthalmologist in acquisition of health parameters that can be used for remote analysis as part of a telemedicine strategy. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 140 patients referred to an ophthalmological telediagnosis center by primary healthcare doctors. The health parameters evaluated were visual acuity (VA), objective ophthalmic measures acquired by autorefraction, keratometry, and intraocular pressure (IOP). Bland-Altman plots were used to analyze agreement between the nursing technician and the ophthalmologist. The Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean bias equal to zero for the VA measurements [95%-LoA: -0.25-0.25], 0.01 [95%-LoA: -0.86-0.88] for spherical equivalent (M), -0.08 [95%-LoA: -1.1-0.95] for keratometry (K) and -0.23 [95%-LoA: -4.4-4.00] for IOP. The measures had a high linear correlation (R [95%CI]: 0.87 [0.82-0.91]; 0.97 [0.96-0.98]; 0.96 [0.95-0.97] and 0.88 [0.84-0.91] respectively). The results observed demonstrate that remote ophthalmological data collection by adequately trained health professionals is viable. This confirms the utility and safety of these solutions for scenarios in which access to ophthalmologists is limited.


Subject(s)
Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Intraocular Pressure , Nursing Staff , Ophthalmologists , Telemedicine , Tonometry, Ocular , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmology , Primary Health Care
20.
Geriatr Psychol Neuropsychiatr Vieil ; 19(4): 359-365, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1528759

ABSTRACT

More than a third of humanity is currently under containment due to the coronavirus pandemic. Containment has been in place in many countries for several weeks. Health authorities are on the warpath against a still mysterious virus and for which they are brought to inform the population while being confronted with many unknowns concerning the Covid-19. So what about mental health? What can generate a situation of containment with the population in quarantine? What psychological impact will this confinement have on our elderly people who are accommodated in rest and care homes in Belgium or in Ehpad in France? Currently, we are not yet aware of French-language articles already published in the medical-psychological aspects related to the coronavirus among the population. We will try, through this article, to approach the medico-psychological question of the nursing staff within the nursing homes and the psychological impact of the residents.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff , Aged , Belgium/epidemiology , France/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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