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1.
Ethiop J Health Sci ; 32(2): 393-404, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1964312

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic has negatively affected nurses. The aim of this study was to assess professional commitment, satisfaction and quality of professional life of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic in Konya city, Turkey. Methods and Material: Cross-sectional study was conducted through online survey in March 2021 in Konya province of Turkey. Current working nurses from 30 public health facilities participated in the study. Standard questionnaire was used, the questionnaire has four components, the first part of questionnaire for characteristics of the participants, the second part was Nursing Professional Commitment Scale, the third part was regarding Professional Satisfaction Scale and the fourth part was related to Employees' Quality of Life Scale. Results: Total 407 nurses participated in the study, only 24% of the participants were male, 76% of them were married and 78% of them were undergraduate degree holders. About two-third (68%) of the nurses worked in COVID 19 treatment Unit serving/treating COVID 19 patients during this period. Some nurses (37%) have considered leaving their job during the Pandemic. Average scores of total nursing professional commitment 2.63±0.48. The nurses' working quality of life level was above average of total satisfaction. Comparing the age groups of the participants with the scale and sub-dimensions, a difference was found only with the Compassion fatigue sub-dimension (p<0.05). There is a positive relationship between total nursing professional commitment, compassion satisfaction and professional satisfaction. Conclusion: COVID-19 pandemic negatively affected nurses' professional commitment, professional satisfaction and quality of their professional life.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Pandemics , Personal Satisfaction , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(15)2022 Jul 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1957313

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, several measures were taken to prevent the transmission of infection in the hospital environment, including the restriction of visits. Little is known about the consequences of these directives, but it is expected that they will have various implications. Thus, this study aimed to understand the consequences of measures to restrict visits to hospitalized individuals. METHODS: A qualitative interpretive study was conducted through semistructured interviews with 10 nurses chosen by convenience. Content analysis was performed using Atlas.ti software, version 22 (Berlin, Germany). RESULTS: Twenty-two categories and eight subcategories were identified and grouped according to their scope: implications for the patient, implications for the family, and implications for care practice. CONCLUSIONS: The identified categories of implications of restricting hospital visits (implications for patients, relatives, and care practices) are incomparably more negative than positive and have a strong potential to cause safety events in the short to long term, also jeopardizing the quality of care. There is the risk of stagnation and even setback due to this removal of families from the hospital environment, not only in terms of safety and quality of care but also with regard to person- and family-centered care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Family , Hospitals , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(7): 1014-1020, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954417

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses were affected by this pandemic more than any other healthcare professionals because they were working on the frontline continuously. Aims: The current study explored how nurses who care for patients with COVID-19 assess this process which they experienced, how they coped with the process, and their psychological experiences. The study was conducted by reaching out to the nurses working at pandemic clinics using the snowball sampling method. A total of 40 nurses were interviewed using telephone. The study employed a descriptive qualitative approach. The data were obtained through telephonic interviews that were performed by the researcher using interview forms. Materials and Methods: The interview notes were analyzed using the content analysis method according to Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Results: As a result of the content analysis, four themes emerged with the following headings: Initial reactions, factors that made an adaptation to the period of pandemic challenging, factors that facilitated the adaptation, and what the period of pandemic taught. Conclusions: It is suggested for nurses that their rotation should be planned effectively, and their social support should be enhanced. They should be provided with adequate personal protective equipment and human resource planning should be improved until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment
4.
Curationis ; 45(1): e1-e9, 2022 Jul 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954235

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND:  Nurses are the backbone of the healthcare system. During the fulfilment of their duties and responsibilities, they experience various types of work-related risks, which harmfully affect their health and nursing quality. OBJECTIVES:  This study aimed to explore and describe perceptions of nurses on occupational health hazards and safety practices in Ditsobotla public hospitals of North West province. METHOD:  An exploratory, descriptive, qualitative research design was undertaken in this study. An explorative design allowed the researcher to identify key issues regarding nurses' perceptions on occupational health hazards and safety practices using Donabedian structure, process and outcome. A total of 15 nurses of different categories participated in the study that formed four focus group discussions. Semi-structured focus group discussions of three to four participants were conducted until data saturation is obtained and at the point where no new themes from participants' perceptions emerged. Creswell and Clark framework of data analysis was used to analyse data. RESULTS:  Three major categories emerged during data analysis: nurse's perception on occupational health hazards in the health settings, Donabedian framework on assessing the quality of care in relation to occupational health hazards and occupational health and safety (OHS) practices. Eight themes were identified. CONCLUSION:  Nurses' perceived different occupational hazards that affect their normal duties and responsibility in the workplace. Future interventions such as training and education on OHS policy should be adopted to promote health and well-being of the staff.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Health , Health Promotion , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Qualitative Research
5.
J Adv Nurs ; 78(8): 2349-2356, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1949450

ABSTRACT

AIM: Although normative and ethical procedures are extremely critical for health care providers, during this unique time, when the pandemic suddenly increased job requirements and workloads, maintaining a morally appropriate working style became an increasingly difficult challenge for nurses. Few previous studies have examined whether these highly increased job demands influence nurses' resource condition, in turn affecting their deviance and task mastery. DESIGNS: In the current study, we proposed a theoretical model examining whether nurses' job demands (the predictor) will affect task mastery and deviance (the outcomes) by increasing resource depletion. METHODS: A multiwave field study of 172 nurses from two comprehensive hospitals was conducted to test the proposed theoretical model from April to August 2020. Descriptive statistics, confirmatory factor analyses, correlation coefficients and linear regressions were used to test the hypotheses. RESULTS: The results suggested that even though job demands may temporarily increase nurses' task mastery and decrease their organizational deviance, they ultimately have a negative influence since resource depletion acts as a side effect that suppresses the two direct effects. CONCLUSION: The theoretical contributions and practical implications of our findings were discussed. Specifically, we suggested that healthcare institutions should provide abundant support for nurses to supplement their resource reserves to avoid the risk of potential medical malpractice. IMPACT: Practically, this study tried to emphasize the important role of nurses' resource condition. Especially we aimed to remind managers and leaders cannot just improve nurses' job demand to deal with the public health crises. They also need to focus on their resource condition during pandemics.


Subject(s)
Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Attitude of Health Personnel , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workload
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(13)2022 Jun 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1934040

ABSTRACT

In the past five years, nursing practice has changed drastically in Poland. Nurses have received many new competencies in response to the need to provide services to patients. The purpose of the study was to analyze nurses' opinions on the new rights to provide nursing advice and to identify factors that influence their opinions in this regard. A descriptive cross-sectional study was conducted among 798 nurses who work in various medical facilities. The influence of selected variables on nurses' opinions on the provision of nursing advice to patients was evaluated using logistic regression. The nurses surveyed had a positive attitude towards new competencies and believed that they were able to independently provide the patient with advice within the scope provided by Polish legislation. Logistic regression showed that the factors that statistically significantly influenced nurses' opinions on particular types of nursing advice were age (p = 0.038), education (p = 0.000), and the place of work of the respondents; that is, hospital (p = 0.016). More research is needed to demonstrate the effectiveness and quality of the implemented nursing advice and its impact on the functioning of the health system.


Subject(s)
Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Poland , Surveys and Questionnaires
7.
PLoS One ; 17(7): e0270958, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1933376

ABSTRACT

AIMS: This study investigated health problems, turnover intention, and actual turnover among shift work nurses. While turnover intention is often used as a proxy variable for turnover, the relationship between these variables requires clarification. This study tested for relevant associations using prospective longitudinal data with a time lag of 12 months. We also tested for associations between health problems (sleep disturbance, fatigue, and depression) and turnover intentions/turnover, with a focus on the mediating role of turnover intention. METHODS: This study conducted a secondary analysis of data from the Shift Work Nurses' Health and Turnover project, which is a prospective longitudinal cohort study. We analyzed health problems, turnover intention, and actual turnover. The data were analyzed via descriptive statistics, the Pearson's chi-squared test, independent t-test, univariable logistic regression, multiple logistic regression, and causal mediation. RESULTS: Participants included 491 shift work female nurses. Of these, 112 (22.8%) had turnover intention, while 38 (7.7%) left their jobs within the 12-month period of investigation. Of the 112 with turnover intention, 22 left their jobs (OR 5.68. 95% CI 2.84-11.36). The logistic regression analysis showed that sleep disturbance and fatigue were associated with turnover intentions and actual turnover, while depression was only associated with turnover intention. The causal mediation analysis showed that turnover intention mediated the relationship between health problems (sleep disturbance and fatigue) and actual turnover (sleep disturbance OR 1.31, 95%CI = 1.02-1.60; fatigue OR 2.11, 95%CI = 1.50-2.68); sleep disturbance had a natural direct effect on actual turnover (OR 2.66, 95%CI,2.07-3.21). CONCLUSION: Turnover intention strongly predicted actual turnover. Sleep disturbances may result in turnover, even in cases without existing turnover intention. These findings highlight the need for early interventions aimed at preventing and alleviating sleep disturbances for shift work female nurses.


Subject(s)
Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Shift Work Schedule , Sleep Wake Disorders , Fatigue , Female , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Longitudinal Studies , Personnel Turnover , Prospective Studies , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
BMJ Open Qual ; 11(2)2022 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The quality of health services is determined on the basis of meeting customers' needs and expectations. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, health systems have faced high degrees of uncertainty as well as a variety of challenges. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the relationship between patient safety friendly hospital standards and customer orientation among Iranian nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional, descriptive-analytical study was conducted on 266 nurses working in Imam Khomeini Hospital, Tehran, Iran selected via stratified sampling in 2020. The study data were collected using a questionnaire including demographic information, patient safety friendly hospital initiatives, and Kim's customer orientation scale. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS V.16 software and were analysed using descriptive statistics, dispersion indices and correlation tests. RESULTS: The mean age and mean duration of working as a nurse were 38.60+7.94 and 13.87+7.41 years, respectively. From the nurses' perspective, the means of patient safety friendly hospital standards and customer orientation were 97.35±16.59 and 16.40±2.62, respectively, both of which were at the moderate level. In addition, patient safety friendly hospital standards and all its dimensions were positively correlated to customer orientation (p<0.001). CONCLUSION: From the nurses' viewpoint, the patient safety friendly hospital standards and customer orientation were both at the moderate level during the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, patient safety friendly hospital standards and all its dimensions were significantly associated with customer orientation. In other words, increase in the patient safety friendly hospital standards was accompanied by an increase in the nurses' customer orientation. These results can provide the organisations delivering health services with the opportunity for management on the basis of multicriteria decision making so as to adapt with the patient safety friendly hospital standards and to internalise customer orientation among nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Safety
9.
Front Public Health ; 10: 839600, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903202

ABSTRACT

Background: While frontline nurses employ coping alternatives to help deal with occupational stress resulting from unprecedented challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, their access to necessary resources is unclear. Objective: This study aims to explore nurses' mental health in Alabama hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak and investigate the impact of organizational and community support on nurse stressor levels, physio-psychosocial responses, and coping strategies employed. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed to bridge our understanding of stress, support, and coping mechanisms and distributed to nurses working with COVID-19-infected patients in hospital settings in Alabama. A total of 232 frontline nurses responded to 79 items in four domains (stressors, physio-psychosocial symptoms, coping, and support) between May 6, 2020, and June 30, 2020. A two-way ANOVA, regression analysis, and mediation of effects were used to analyze the data. Results: This study found that both social support and use of coping strategies contributed to the reduction of physio-psychosocial symptoms. Differences were found in how older frontline nurses perceived the efficacy of social support and certain coping strategies. This study provides further evidence of the importance of organizational support in addressing the harmful physio-psychosocial symptoms experienced by nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Social Support
11.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 71: 103250, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899752

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To illuminate patients' experiences of being a part of an liaison nurse support service focused on supporting recently transferred intensive care unit patients. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/DESIGN: A qualitative inductive descriptive design including in-depth interviews was chosen. SETTING: A project including an liaison nurse support service-intervention was undertaken during a 16-week period at a University hospital in Sweden. The liaison nurse support service was available Monday-Friday 10 am - 6 pm and nurses visited the patient 1-4 times after transfer to the ward. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Of the 109 patients who were visited by the liaison nurse support service, 14 agreed to be interviewed about their experiences of the transfer. Data was analysed by inductive content analysis. FINDINGS: One overall theme, An advocate in a vulnerable situation emerged from the data. Four subthemes were identified: Ensures transfer of information between the intensive care unit and the general ward, Makes the circumstances understandable and coordinates between the care levels and Offers emotional support and stability in an uncertain situation. CONCLUSION: The liaison nurse support service contributed to ensuring accurate transfer of information, solved problems when the patient themselves did not have control or strength and provided emotional support.


Subject(s)
Nurse's Role , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Patient Outcome Assessment , Qualitative Research
12.
Nurs Manage ; 53(6): 41-43, 2022 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1891055
13.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(11)2022 06 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1884126

ABSTRACT

The current study on the intention to leave the organization among nurses and midwives aligns with the broader direction of research on the consequences of demanding jobs. This is particularly important in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, which began in 2020 and is ongoing. The aim of the current study was to identify the levels of intention to leave the organization and job satisfaction in a sample of 390 Polish nurses and midwives. A multiple stepwise linear regression was carried out to establish which variables are predictors of job satisfaction and intention to leave the organization. The following measures were used in the study: Nurses' Occupational Stressor Scale, The Brief Resilience Coping Scale, The Turnover Intention Scale, The Job Satisfaction Scale, and an occupational questionnaire (number of workplaces, weekly number of evening and night shifts, working at a unit dedicated to treating COVID-19, working as a supervisor/executive). The current study showed that almost 25% of the sample reported high turnover intention, and a similar proportion reported low job satisfaction. Resilience was related to nurses' job satisfaction. In the predictive models for job satisfaction, the organizational factor of the number of workplaces was significant (positively related), while job experience was a negative predictor of intention to leave. The practical implications of the results and the need to continue research on this topic are also discussed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Midwifery , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 754, 2022 Jun 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1879238

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought an opportunity to increase investment in the nursing practice environment, which has greatly impacted patients, nurses, and organizations. However, there were limited studies concerning the changes in the practice environment since the COVID-19 pandemic and the way to improve it from nurses' perspectives. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 460 nurses from seven hospitals in Sichuan, China. Both the quantitative and qualitative data were collected from an online questionnaire. The quantitative data were collected using the Chinese version of the Practice Environment Scale-Nursing Work Index and compared with available norms in 2010. The qualitative data were collected through an open question following the scale and analyzed by content analysis. RESULTS: The mean of the score of the practice environment scale was 3.44 (SD = 0.56) out of 4.00. The score of the total scale and the dimensions were significantly higher than the norms, apart from nurse-physician relations and nurse participation in hospital affairs. The qualitative findings revealed positive changes in nursing foundations for quality of care, nurse participation in hospital affairs and nurse-physician relations, and poor staffing and resource adequacy. The improvement in the working model and ward environment is the primary concern of nurses. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic brought some positive changes in the nursing practice environment, but more efforts are needed to solve those nagging and important problems, such as staff shortages and low participation. Nursing managers and hospital leaders were encouraged to listen to nurses' concerns and value this suitable opportunity for changing and improving to achieve better health services and coping ability to deal with emergency events going forward. Improving the ward environment and taking a professional model instead of sticking to the tedious process might be worthwhile.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(10)2022 05 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1875619

ABSTRACT

This study aims to investigate research trends concerning job stress among hospital nurses. Articles about job stress among hospital nurses published in English from 2008 to 2018 were searched. In the first search, 2673 articles were extracted from the MEDLINE, EMBASE, KoreaMed, KERIS, KISS, KISTI, and KMbase databases. Altogether, 154 articles were used in the systematic review and meta-analysis. Thirty-nine variables were explored regarding job stress. Among the major variables, insufficient job control, personal conflict, and burnout had a positive correlation. In contrast, intention to stay, job satisfaction, and personal accomplishment had a negative correlation. In the meta-analysis conducted in relation to a specific conceptual framework, the negative-outcome factors showed significant positive correlations with job stress, whereas the positive-outcome factors showed significant negative correlations with job stress. This study identified factors associated with job stress in nurses through a meta-correlation analysis, and the overall correlation coefficient was relatively high at 0.51. Job factors and moderators had significant meta-correlation coefficients. These results can be utilized in clinical practice and research to help develop intervention programs to relieve job stress among nurses.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Personal Satisfaction
16.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 72: 103276, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1867198

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Todescribe and evaluate reported missed nursing care in the critical care context during different phases of the COVID-19 pandemic in Sweden. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY: A comparative cross-sectional design was used, comparing missed nursing care in three samples: before the COVID-19 pandemic in 2019, during the second wave of the pandemic in spring 2020, and during the third wave of the pandemic in fall 2021. SETTING: The study was conducted at critical care units at a university hospital, Sweden. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The MISSCARE Survey-Swedish version was used to collect data along with two study-specific questions concerning perception of patient safety and quality of care. RESULTS: Significantly more overtime hours and number of days absent due to illness were reported during the pandemic. The nurse/patient ratio was above the recommended level at all data collection time points. Most missed nursing care was reported in items concerning basic care. The most reported reasons for missed nursing care in all samples concerned inadequate staffing, urgent situations, and a rise in patient volume. Most nurses in all samples perceived the level of patient safety and quality of care as good, and the majority had no intention to leave their current position. CONCLUSION: The pandemic had a great impact on the critical care workforce but few elements of missed nursing care were affected. To measure and use missed nursing care as a quality indicator could be valuable for nursing managers, to inform them and improve their ability to meet changes in patient needs with different workforce approaches in critical care settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Care , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Quality of Health Care
18.
Nurs Health Sci ; 24(2): 469-478, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1854117

ABSTRACT

The emergence of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought pressure and challenges to nurses worldwide. This study aims to understand the lived experiences of nurses in overcoming challenges when delivering care for patients with COVID-19 in Indonesia. The study employed a phenomenological research design. The researchers purposely selected nine nurses who provided care for patients with COVID-19 at an urban public hospital in Yogyakarta, Indonesia, between September and December 2020. The researchers conducted face-to-face interviews with participants. The interview data transcriptions were analyzed using Colaizzi's phenomenological analysis. The experiences of nurses in providing care for patients with COVID-19 can be summarized into three themes: (1) getting caught unprepared, (2) understanding and adapting to a new working situation, and (3) finding new meaning in the nursing profession. This study suggested that nurses overcame difficulties in caring for patients with COVID-19 by using multidimensional and culturally informed coping strategies. Hospital managers and policymakers need to consider culturally relevant coping strategies (i.e., religious-based coping strategies) when supporting healthcare providers during public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Indonesia , Patient Care , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 61: 103327, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851871

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Disaster nursing competencies and their willingness to participate are essential for the success of disaster relief nurses. This study investigates the correlations among emergency room and intensive care unit nurses' training needs, willingness to participate, achievement motivation and job satisfaction as well as their mutual influences on disaster relief efforts. METHODS: A convenience sampling cross-sectional study was conducted, where 488 emergency room and intensive care unit nurses from five hospitals in Taiwan participated (response rate: 84.4%). The relationships among the variables were verified using structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Training needs in disaster nursing were found to be positively correlated with willingness to participate and job satisfaction. Moreover, willingness to participate was found to be positively correlated with achievement motivation and job satisfaction. Achievement motivation was found to be positively correlated with job satisfaction. Furthermore, willingness to participate in disaster relief was found to indirectly mediate job satisfaction through achievement motivation. CONCLUSIONS: The fulfilment of training needs for disaster nursing and willingness to participate may have an impact on nurses' job satisfaction through the mediating effect of achievement motivation. Nurses' learning needs should be the foremost consideration in disaster nursing training to alleviate human resource shortages and improve disaster responses. These findings can serve as a reference for increasing preparedness training for nurses in disaster management. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses substantially contribute to the progression of disaster relief and postdisaster reconstruction. Successful and effective disaster management relies on sufficient nurse responses and training preparedness. Nurses' willingness to participate and achievement motivation in disaster nursing can have an impact on their job satisfaction and alleviate distress for both themselves and patients for the purpose of disaster relief.


Subject(s)
Disasters , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Motivation , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Inquiry ; 59: 469580221094327, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846663

ABSTRACT

The study explored the experiences of intensive care unit nursing staff caring for COVID-19 patients who eventually died during the two first pandemic waves. We used - descriptive-qualitative-phenomenological. The findings included four main themes-the first vs the second COVID-19 waves, fighting for life and being unable to win, a chronicle of pre-determined death, and nurse's emotional coping with patient death. Based on these findings, we have concluded that in order to enhance nurses' mental health, policy makers and governments need to create an appropriate support system for them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
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