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1.
Nurse Educ Pract ; 61: 103327, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1851871

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Disaster nursing competencies and their willingness to participate are essential for the success of disaster relief nurses. This study investigates the correlations among emergency room and intensive care unit nurses' training needs, willingness to participate, achievement motivation and job satisfaction as well as their mutual influences on disaster relief efforts. METHODS: A convenience sampling cross-sectional study was conducted, where 488 emergency room and intensive care unit nurses from five hospitals in Taiwan participated (response rate: 84.4%). The relationships among the variables were verified using structural equation modelling. RESULTS: Training needs in disaster nursing were found to be positively correlated with willingness to participate and job satisfaction. Moreover, willingness to participate was found to be positively correlated with achievement motivation and job satisfaction. Achievement motivation was found to be positively correlated with job satisfaction. Furthermore, willingness to participate in disaster relief was found to indirectly mediate job satisfaction through achievement motivation. CONCLUSIONS: The fulfilment of training needs for disaster nursing and willingness to participate may have an impact on nurses' job satisfaction through the mediating effect of achievement motivation. Nurses' learning needs should be the foremost consideration in disaster nursing training to alleviate human resource shortages and improve disaster responses. These findings can serve as a reference for increasing preparedness training for nurses in disaster management. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses substantially contribute to the progression of disaster relief and postdisaster reconstruction. Successful and effective disaster management relies on sufficient nurse responses and training preparedness. Nurses' willingness to participate and achievement motivation in disaster nursing can have an impact on their job satisfaction and alleviate distress for both themselves and patients for the purpose of disaster relief.


Subject(s)
Disasters , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Motivation , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Surveys and Questionnaires
2.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(12): 537-540, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598060

ABSTRACT

When we look back on 2020, it is hard not to focus on the COVID-19 pandemic that has affected everything from nursing practice to world politics. Along with those challenges, there has been tremendous opportunity for nursing professional development change and growth. 2020 brought several key issues into play related to nursing continuing professional development. This article highlights many of these important issues. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(12):537-540.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Staff Development/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
4.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(6): 294-300, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1248070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The global COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented challenges to the health care workforce. Little is known about the effect of the pandemic on new RNs and their preparedness for such a crisis. This study explored the lived experiences of RNs transitioning from students to professionals during the pandemic. METHOD: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 15 new RNs working in acute care facilities during the Maryland COVID-19 State of Emergency. RESULTS: Three themes were identified to describe the experiences of new nurses transitioning to practice in the midst of the COVID-19 pandemic: uncertainty, vulnerability, and resilience. CONCLUSION: New nurses need greater support during transition to practice. Initiatives to improve trusting relationships between new nurses and their organizations and support of the development of essential relationships (e.g., peers, frontline management, and educators) could enhance new nurses' resilience and commitment to stay with the organization. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(6):294-300.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Clinical Competence , Critical Care Nursing , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Professional Role/psychology , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Maryland , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
5.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(3): E5-E9, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1219254

ABSTRACT

The nursing professional development practitioner's call to action at a large, acute care academic facility during the novel coronavirus pandemic required adaptability and resiliency. When rapid, unprecedented challenges altered nursing professional development workflow, a department of 16 practitioners split into three teams. The teams achieved goals by meeting the demand for education and training of frontline staff during the surge in novel coronavirus patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse Practitioners/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Interprofessional Relations , New Jersey/epidemiology , Nursing Evaluation Research
6.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 18(1)2021 Apr 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202200

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) has impacted overall nursing education program requirements, classroom delivery of theory hours, as well as clinical and laboratory learning opportunities for students. The aims of this study were to explore the impacts of COVID 19 on the students' perceptions of readiness for practice and their preparation for the NCLEX exam and initial clinical practice. METHODS: A cross-sectional descriptive design was used to investigate the impact of COVID-19 on senior BSN students' preparation for NCLEX and future careers. The Casey-Fink Readiness for Practice Survey was used to investigate the perceptions of the BSN students' clinical confidence and readiness for practice. RESULTS: Students reported substantial impacts of COVID-19 on their clinical experiences, their ability to practice skills and procedures, their preparations for NCLEX exam, and their nursing career. The most significant confidence concerns noted from this study seemed to center on handling multiple patient assignments, calling the physician, responding to a change in patient condition, and treating a dying patient. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare experts expect that the impact of COVID-19 may last until 2022. More research is needed to understand the impact of COVID-19 on nursing education and transition to nursing practice. While clinical confidence and readiness for practice are essential topics, more research is needed to investigate the psychological and physiological impacts of COVID-19 on nurses, nursing students, nursing preceptors, and faculty members.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Education, Nursing, Baccalaureate/methods , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Self Efficacy , Students, Nursing/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/psychology , Conflict, Psychological , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Nursing Education Research
7.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(2): 142-151, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132659

ABSTRACT

Whether natural or human-induced, disasters are a global issue that impact health care systems' operations, especially in the acute care setting. The current COVID-19 pandemic is a recent illustration of how health care systems and providers, especially nurses, respond to a rapidly evolving crisis. Nurse leaders in the acute care setting are pivotal in responding to the multifactorial challenges caused by a disaster. A quality improvement project was developed to increase nurse leaders' knowledge and confidence in disaster management during the COVID-19 pandemic at 2 Magnet-designated acute care hospitals within the John Muir Health system in Northern California. A total of 50 nurse leaders initially participated in this project, with 33 participants completing the postintervention survey. Results indicated significant improvement in perceived knowledge and confidence in disaster management after the intervention. Qualitative responses from project participants highlighted the need to annualize educational opportunities to sustain knowledge and consistently review emergency management operations plans. This quality improvement project provided an approach to educating nurse leaders in disaster management to promote resilience, support of employees, and optimal patient outcomes during disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Disaster Medicine/education , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Leadership , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disaster Medicine/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 52(3): 109-111, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1102576

ABSTRACT

This article describes how a health care organization optimized staffing during the COVID-19 crisis by capitalizing on the expertise of nursing professional development practitioners to create a rapid deployment onboarding plan. The rapid onboarding training plan provided Riley Hospital for Children at Indiana University Health with a sense of stability in an uncertain time. Designing a plan that easily could be modified allowed the organization to be prepared during the pandemic and at a point where staffing needs must meet surge capacity. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2021;52(3):109-111.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Inservice Training , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Pediatric Nursing , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Hospitals, Pediatric , Humans , Indiana/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Pediatric Nursing/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Surge Capacity
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(4)2021 02 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1090327

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus (COVID-19), a public health emergency of international concern, has made healthcare staff preparation and the nurturing of high-quality and adequate nursing professionals critical issues. This study aimed to explore registered nurses' competence in nursing care and their intention to stay in their current workplace. In this study, participants who had graduated from different nursing education systems were recruited. The results indicated that nurses' level of commitment to the workplace and clinical stress were positively correlated with the experience of working with patients. Stepwise regression analysis revealed the following significant predictors for intention to stay: clinical stress, frequency of caring for people with infections, and taking a course on infectious nursing. The novice nurses' competencies in the areas of pandemic disease care and care for infectious adults depended on the experience of nursing care and nursing competence in their professional careers, which may have impact on the nurses' intention to stay. Therefore, clinical stress, frequency of caring for patients, and taking nursing courses were correlated with novice nurses' intention to stay in their professional careers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , Personnel Turnover , Professional Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace
10.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(2): 142-151, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1080947

ABSTRACT

Whether natural or human-induced, disasters are a global issue that impact health care systems' operations, especially in the acute care setting. The current COVID-19 pandemic is a recent illustration of how health care systems and providers, especially nurses, respond to a rapidly evolving crisis. Nurse leaders in the acute care setting are pivotal in responding to the multifactorial challenges caused by a disaster. A quality improvement project was developed to increase nurse leaders' knowledge and confidence in disaster management during the COVID-19 pandemic at 2 Magnet-designated acute care hospitals within the John Muir Health system in Northern California. A total of 50 nurse leaders initially participated in this project, with 33 participants completing the postintervention survey. Results indicated significant improvement in perceived knowledge and confidence in disaster management after the intervention. Qualitative responses from project participants highlighted the need to annualize educational opportunities to sustain knowledge and consistently review emergency management operations plans. This quality improvement project provided an approach to educating nurse leaders in disaster management to promote resilience, support of employees, and optimal patient outcomes during disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Disaster Medicine/education , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Leadership , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disaster Medicine/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(2): 152-158, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078873

ABSTRACT

This article describes the implementation of an evidence-based mentoring program for new registered nurses (RNs) hired into medical-surgical units in a small community-based hospital during the unfolding of the SARS-Cov2 (COVID-19) pandemic. The hospital's nursing leadership supported the program implementation during the COVID-19 pandemic to provide a broader support system to new RNs to improve nurse retention. During a response to the pandemic, the medical-surgical units faced numerous process changes in a short time, which further reinforced the urgency of an additional support system for the newly hired RNs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Leadership , Mentoring/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Evidence-Based Nursing/organization & administration , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Program Development/methods , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(1): 66-68, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1006346

ABSTRACT

With the rapid escalation of COVID-19 educational needs within hospitals, it was imperative for content experts of the infection prevention departments to lean on the expertise of nursing professional development specialists. This article provides a brief overview of how a clinical education and professional development department was deployed to assist and support the COVID-19 response efforts.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Cooperative Behavior , Infection Control/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , United States/epidemiology
13.
Aust Health Rev ; 44(6): 916-923, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998061

ABSTRACT

Objective Mental health nurses (MHNs) have a long, under-recognised, history of engaging in psychotherapeutic practice across the spectrum of mental illness and mental health problems. There is a need for a psychotherapeutic response for people with complex or serious mental health problems within the stepped care model and in response to increased need for psychotherapeutic responses to COVID-19 and natural disasters. This project sought to identify the educational preparation and self-reported competency of MHNs to clinically undertake psychotherapy across the continuum of care. Methods Situated within a larger mixed-methods study exploring how MHNs practice psychotherapy, adapt it to routine care and envisage the future, this paper reports the findings from a survey of MHNs regarding their educational preparation, experience and competence in modalities of psychotherapy and the application of psychotherapy with specific clinical groups. Results In all, 153 MHNs responded to a request to participate in the study. In this cohort, 86% of nurses had postgraduate qualifications specific to psychotherapy and 95% had worked for over 10 years in the mental health field and had hundreds of hours of training in psychotherapy. There was a high level of self-reported competence in working with people with serious mental health problems and at-risk or vulnerable groups. Conclusions Currently, MHNs are not recognised in federal funding arrangements to procure psychotherapeutic intervention for members of the Australian population who require it. MHNs ought to be recognised as independent providers based on both the psychotherapeutic skills they possess and their specialist clinical skills of working with people across the spectrum of mental health problems. Appropriately qualified MHNs need to be funded to use their skills in psychotherapy via access to appropriate funding arrangements, such as Better Access and the National Disability Insurance Scheme. What is known about the topic? MHNs do not appear to be recognised as having postgraduate knowledge and skills in psychotherapy and other psychotherapeutic interventions. This lack of recognition has resulted in the Australian public being unable to access subsidised specialist psychotherapeutic services by this highly experienced group. Most published commentary has been around the Mental Health Nurse Incentive Program, but, to date, scholarly work related to this program has not influenced public views and policy formation despite multiple favourable evaluations. What does this paper add? This study highlights that MHNs possess a largely unrecognised and valuable skill set in psychotherapy practice that they can adapt to work with people with complex needs. What are the implications to practitioners? MHNs possess skills and experience that, if recognised and funded, could be rapidly mobilised to improve consumer outcomes across the continuum of stepped care and in response to increased need during COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence/standards , Mental Disorders/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Psychiatric Nursing/standards , Adult , Australia , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pandemics , Psychiatric Nursing/education , Psychotherapy/education , Psychotherapy/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
14.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(12): 541-543, 2020 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-976382

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has created unprecedented opportunities for training and development to move to online formats. The discussion board is an essential online tool to advance leadership development. Both learner and educator tips are provided for discussion board optimization, including considerations for rubric development for learner evaluation. [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(12):541-543.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Curriculum , Education, Distance/organization & administration , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Nurse Administrators/education , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Staff Development/organization & administration , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 24(6): 699-702, 2020 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-961445

ABSTRACT

One casualty of the COVID-19 pandemic was in-person professional conferences. Organizations, including the American Society of Clinical Oncology, American Association for Cancer Research, and Oncology Nursing Society, had to quickly pivot and radically transform the delivery of the traditional in-person conference to a virtual offering accessible to thousands of oncology healthcare professionals. However, what may have felt catastrophic has revealed unique opportunities to engage individuals in professional offerings, including those who, because of cost or travel, may not have previously participated. In this article, the authors present insights into how to optimize virtual learning experiences during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Congresses as Topic , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Oncology Nursing/education , Oncology Nursing/organization & administration , Societies, Nursing/organization & administration , Virtual Reality , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , United States
17.
J Nurses Prof Dev ; 37(3): 143-146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-811162

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic impacted every aspect of the personal and professional lives of healthcare providers. Nursing professional development practitioners are challenged with ongoing classroom education, new hire onboarding, and just-in-time education for staff. This article is intended to present the unique challenges that the COVID-19 pandemic placed on nursing professional development practitioners in a large academic medical center and how opportunities presented to revise old education practices.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Education, Nursing/organization & administration , Inservice Training/organization & administration , Nurse's Role , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , COVID-19/epidemiology , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , United States/epidemiology
19.
J Contin Educ Nurs ; 51(9): 399-401, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-729673

ABSTRACT

In light of the COVID-19 pandemic and uncertainties around risk of transmission, urgent hospital resuscitation (also known as "Code Blue") efforts are needed, pivoting to protect health care workers. This article provides teaching tips for "Protected Code Blues." [J Contin Educ Nurs. 2020;51(9):399-401.].


Subject(s)
Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/education , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/nursing , Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation/standards , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Health Personnel/education , Nursing Staff, Hospital/education , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , Simulation Training/organization & administration , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Curriculum , Education, Nursing, Continuing/organization & administration , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2
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