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3.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(1): 12-18, 2022 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570150

ABSTRACT

A COVID19RNStories website allowed RNs in this integrated health system to "tell their stories" during the recent pandemic. From April to August 2020, approximately 100 items were posted with 4 themes emerging. COVID19RNStories had no preconceived hypotheses or specific questions to answer: RNs shared whatever they felt was relevant to their experiences. This approach provided real-time information on issues and concerns of RNs during the 1st wave of COVID-19. This article discusses the identified themes with recommendations for nursing leaders to support staff during the pandemic and future unexpected emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet , Nurse's Role/psychology , Workload/psychology , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/organization & administration , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , Quality of Health Care
4.
Work ; 68(4): 969-979, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1557738

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Professionalism, stress and demographic factors are the three key influences in nurses' intention to provide care. OBJECTIVES: This study examined the levels of work intention, stress and professionalism of nurses and determine the relationship between nursing work intention and factors in response to COVID-19. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on 362 nurses from COVID-19-devoted hospitals in Iran. A self-administered electronic-based questionnaire was developed and used to determine levels of stress, professionalism, and nursing intention. Multiple regression analysis was carried out to analyze the correlation between nursing intention with respect to stress and professionalism. RESULTS: The overall stress, professionalism, and nursing intention scores were 48.56, 21.46, and 17.83 respectively. There were significant differences in nursing intention scores between gender, marital status, and having training groups (p < 0.05). The regression analysis revealed that nursing intention had a significant relationship with older age (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.11,B = 17.02), higher income level (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.81,B = 6.98), having previous training (p = 0.008,S.E = 1.22,B = 3.27), higher stress level (p < 0.001,S.E = 2.37,B = -21.39), and high professionalism level (p < 0.001,S.E = 1.16,B = 11.99). CONCLUSION: Having an adequate staff requirement plan, planning appropriate training for nurses, and proactive psychological support are crucial to prevent burnout and continue to provide nursing services.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Disease Outbreaks , Intention , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Professionalism , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Iran/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
J Christ Nurs ; 38(3): E28-E31, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1532593

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Nurses who provided care to patients with coronavirus (COVID-19) and supported patients in their transition from life to death in the absence of patients' families have been especially needful of spiritual self-care. A spiritual first aid kit can help nurses cope with these difficult times. Spiritual self-care is vital for all nurses to renew and preserve the psychological, spiritual, and physical self.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Self Care/psychology , Self Efficacy , Adaptation, Psychological , COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care/psychology , First Aid , Humans , Spirituality
6.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(11): 543-545, 2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1504076

ABSTRACT

Sufficient sleep is vital to the health and safety of healthcare workers and patients alike. Despite this, formal sleep promotion programs rarely exist within healthcare. Guidance does exist for how to incorporate strategies within healthcare organizations. Nurse leaders can spearhead efforts by promoting healthy sleep and instituting change through scheduling practices, unit policies, and supporting staff when barriers to healthy sleep develop.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Organizational Innovation , Sleep/physiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Leadership , Organizational Culture
7.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(5): 767-779, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1469905

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The difficulty of providing care to patients with COVID-19 and the extensive social changes caused by COVID-19 have made the experience of providing care to these patients unique. The present study was conducted to explore the lived experiences of nurses providing altruistic care to patients with COVID-19. METHODS: The present qualitative phenomenological study was conducted in spring 2020 on 12 nurses (8 women and 4 men) selected by purposive sampling from hospitals admitting patients with COVID-19 in Tehran, Iran. Data were collected through open, in-depth, semi-structured interviews and were analyzed using the Glaizer technique. FINDINGS: The lived experiences of nurses dealing with COVID-19 included: Disquietude, with subcategories including shock and the dilemma of staying or leaving; Intellectuality, with subcategories including patience, self-sacrifice, spiritual growth; Human transcendence, with subcategories including love of the profession, community's appreciation, and improving the value of nursing. DISCUSSION: Nurses' experience of providing patient care has a transcendental nature, such that nurses went from the usual fears to transcendence in internal and social aspects. The experience of passing through these stages took place over a short period of time, and nurses felt good about this achievement. Despite the difficult circumstances, patient care was not unpleasant for them; rather, it made them feel like a superhuman.


Subject(s)
Altruism , COVID-19/therapy , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Emotions , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Motivation , Nurse's Role , Qualitative Research
8.
J Emerg Nurs ; 47(6): 879-891, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1461326

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: This study aimed to assess (1) the prevalence of burnout risk among nurses working in intensive care units and emergency department before and during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic and (2) the individual and work-related associated factors. METHODS: Data were collected as part of a cross-sectional study on intensive care unit and emergency nurses in Belgium using 2 self-administered online questionnaires distributed just before the pandemic (January 2020, N = 422) and during the first peak of the pandemic (April 2020, N = 1616). Burnout was assessed with the Maslach Burnout Inventory scale. RESULTS: The overall prevalence of burnout risk was higher among emergency nurses than intensive care unit nurses but was not significantly different after the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (from 69.8% to 70.7%, χ²â€¯= 0.15, P = .68), whereas it increased significantly among intensive care unit nurses (from 51.2% to 66.7%, χ²â€¯= 23.64, P < .003). During the pandemic, changes in workload and the lack of personal protective equipment were significantly associated with a higher likelihood of burnout risk, whereas social support from colleagues and from superiors and management were associated with a lower likelihood of burnout risk. Several determinants of burnout risk were different between intensive care unit and emergency nurses. CONCLUSION: Our findings indicate that nurses in intensive care unit and emergency department were at risk of burnout but their experience during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic was quite different. Therefore, it is important to implement specific measures for these 2 groups of nurses to prevent and manage their risk of burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Pandemics , Belgium/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emergency Service, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Am J Nurs ; 121(9): 7, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1402694
11.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 301, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, renal healthcare practitioners provide intensive and protracted support to a highly complex multi-morbid patient population however knowledge about the impact of COVID-19 on these practitioners is extremely limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the experiences of COVID-19 with renal healthcare practitioners during the first global lockdown between June 2020 and September 2020. METHODS: A multi-methods approach was carried out including a quantitative survey and qualitative interviews. This was a multinational study of renal healthcare practitioners from 29 countries. Quantitative: A self-designed survey on COVID-19 experiences and standardised questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire-12; Maslach Burnout Inventory). Descriptive statistics were generated for numerical data. Qualitative: Online semi-structured interviews were conducted. Data was subjected to thematic analysis. Renal healthcare practitioners (n = 251) completed an online survey. Thirteen renal healthcare practitioners took part in semi-structured interviews (12 nurses and 1 dietician). RESULTS: The majority of participants surveyed were female (86.9 %; n = 218), nurses (86.9 %; n = 218) with an average 21.5 (SD = 11.1) years' experience since professional qualification, and 16.3 years (SD = 9.3) working in renal healthcare. Survey responses indicated a level of preparedness, training and satisfactory personal protective equipment during the pandemic however approximately 40.3 % experienced fear about attending work, and 49.8 % experienced mental health distress. The highest prevalence of burnout was emotional exhaustion (35.9 %). Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis highlighting the holistic complexities in managing renal healthcare, a neglected specialist workforce, and the need for appropriate support at work during a pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results have highlighted the psychological impact, in terms of emotional exhaustion and mental health distress in our sample of renal healthcare practitioners. As the pandemic has continued, it is important to consider the long-term impact on an already stretched workforce including the risk of developing mental health disorders. Future research and interventions are required to understand and improve the provision of psychological support for specialist medical and nursing personnel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Nephrology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrology Nursing/economics , Nephrology Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychological Distress , Qualitative Research , Workforce
12.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257064, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394555

ABSTRACT

The pandemic of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has brought significant pressure on nurses globally as they are the frontline of care. This study aimed to explore the experiences and challenges of nurses who worked with hospitalised patients with COVID-19. In this qualitative study, a purposive sample of 14 nurses participated in in-depth telephone interviews. Data were analysed using Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Five key themes emerged: (1) physical and psychological distress of nurses, (2) willingness to work, (3) the essential role of support mechanisms, (4) educational and informational needs of nurses and (5) the role of modern technology in COVID-19 care. Although the provision of care led to physical and psychological distress among nurses, with their commitment and professional obligation, it is a new experience that leads to personal satisfaction. Guilty feeling related to inefficiency of care, witnessing the suffering of patients, discomfort associated with wearing personal protective equipment (PPE), work-related issues (e.g., long hour shifts), negative impact to the family and rejection by others are the leading distress factors. Religious beliefs, including keeping trust in good and bad merits, have become a strong coping mechanism. Addressing distress among nurses is essential. The reported learning needs of nurses included skills related to donning and doffing PPE, skills in performing nursing procedures and breaking bad news. Nurse managers need to pay special attention to expanding training opportunities as well as support mechanisms, for example, welfare, appreciations and counselling services for nurses. Modern technology, particularly robots and telecommunication, can perform an essential role in COVID-19 care. The establishment of timely policies and strategies to protect health workers during a national disaster like COVID-19 is needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Fear/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Psychological Distress , Psychology, Clinical , Robotics/standards , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Telecommunications
13.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376367

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
14.
Holist Nurs Pract ; 35(5): 257-263, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1361815

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) epidemic is associated with impaired sleep quality in nurses for several reasons. The present study aimed to determine the effect of an online mindfulness-based stress reduction (MBSR) program on improving the sleep quality of nurses working in the COVID-19 care units. In this randomized controlled clinical trial study, all nurses in the 2 COVID-19 patient care units were randomly assigned to the control and intervention groups. The MBSR program was implemented online for 7 weeks for the intervention group by a trainer. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) was completed online by the participants in both groups before and after the intervention. The results of the data analysis indicated that the intervention improved the scores of subjective sleep quality, sleep latency, and sleep efficiency in the intervention group. In the control group, there was a significant increase in the scores of subjective sleep quality, daily performance, and the total index score in the posttest. Besides, there was a significant difference between the 2 groups in only 2 components of sleep latency and subjective sleep quality. The MBSR program can be an effective intervention to improve the sleep quality of nurses working in COVID-19 intensive care units who are at risk of sleep quality disorders in stressful situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Internet-Based Intervention , Mindfulness , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Program Evaluation , Sleep , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Adult , Female , Humans , Iran , Male , Meditation , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Latency
17.
Clin J Oncol Nurs ; 25(4): 488, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315868

ABSTRACT

As a nursing student back in the late 1970s, I thought I would not work in oncology because it hit too close to home; my mother, my grandmother, my grandfather, and a college friend had all had cancer. Working with patients with cancer would bring up too many memories and worries to which I would never subject myself.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Neoplasms/nursing , Neoplasms/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Oncology Nursing/methods , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(7-8): 374-378, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1309671

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The goal of this qualitative phenomenological study was to explore in-depth, critical care nurses' (CCNs) lived experience while caring for coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) patients during the pandemic. BACKGROUND: CCNs play an important role during pandemics characterized by highly contagious, life-threatening disease. Understanding the experience of CCNs during a pandemic is particularly important because of the high rate of burnout within this group, as well as a shortage of these caregivers across the globe. METHODS: Using Heidegger's interpretive phenomenological approach, interviews were conducted with 10 CCNs caring for COVID-19 patients. The goal of the interviews was to access a deep layer of understanding regarding participants' lived experience. RESULTS: Themes of role frustration, emotional and physical exhaustion, and the importance of presence were revealed. CONCLUSION: Themes revealed suggest a number of actions hospital administrators could take to support CCNs as they experience the challenges of a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care Nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Emotions , Fatigue , Female , Humans , Male , Nurse's Role , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
20.
Nurs Leadersh (Tor Ont) ; 34(2): 16-20, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1291998

ABSTRACT

In their paper, Stelnicki and Carleton (2021) highlight both the findings of their 2019 survey of nurses' mental health (Stelnicki et al. 2020) and more recent literature published during the COVID-19 pandemic. This response outlines the role of nursing leaders in enabling the mental health of nurses in a mental health and addiction setting, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Psychiatric Nursing/organization & administration , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Psychiatric/organization & administration , Humans , Infection Control/standards , Leadership , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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