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1.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1015316, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099276

ABSTRACT

Background: In March 2022, Shanghai, China, was hit by a severe wave of SARS-CoV-2 transmission caused by the Omicron variant strain. The medical staff was greatly infected during this period, which posed a traumatic event for them. Meanwhile, they also experience post-traumatic growth under introspection and positive change. However, the psychological coping and growth after infection with COVID-19 among medical staff have rarely been investigated. Objectives: To explore the process and influencing factors of post-traumatic growth among emergency nurses infected with coronavirus disease (COVID-19) so as to provide a new perspective and theoretical basis for psychological rehabilitation or intervention for medical staff who experienced traumatic events. Methods: The study used a qualitative design based on the phenomenological approach. A purposive sampling method was used to explore the subjective feelings and post-traumatic growth among 13 first-line emergency nurses infected with COVID-19 in Shanghai, China. Semi-structured face-to-face interviews were conducted in June 2022. A Seven-step Colaizzi process was used for data analysis. Results: Themes were described and extracted from the experience and insights at different stages during the fight against the virus. Three main themes, i.e., stress period, adjustment period, and growth period, as well as several sub-themes, were identified. Conclusion: First-line emergency nurses infected with COVID-19 are a sensitive group that should be given more attention. Investigating how they achieve psychological adjustment and growth in the case of severe trauma can provide valuable references for nursing management and education in the future. Society, hospital and nursing managers should pay more attention to the PTG of nurses and establish supportive PTG strategies, which will benefit the retention rate and career development of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Posttraumatic Growth, Psychological , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , China/epidemiology
2.
Adv Emerg Nurs J ; 44(4): 333-344, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2087935

ABSTRACT

Emergency nurses are one of the groups at risk most during the COVID-19 pandemic. The purpose of the authors of this qualitative study was to reveal the psychosocial difficulties and needs of nurses working in the emergency department of a university hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. This descriptive phenomenological study was conducted in the emergency department of a university hospital in the West of Turkey. In-depth interviews were conducted with 14 emergency nurses. Colaizzi's descriptive analysis method was used. Findings regarding the psychological difficulties and needs of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic were collected under the following 4 themes: being a nurse in the emergency department in the pandemic, emotional chaos, living with losses, and the support needs. Not only did the emergency nurses state that working as a nurse in the pandemic was challenging and exhausting but they also emphasized the vital importance of nursing care in the pandemic. During the pandemic, the nurses went through different emotional processes according to the stages of the pandemic. Although they needed psychological support, they were expected to meet organizational requirements.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , Emergency Service, Hospital
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043698

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic was a fertile ground for nurses' exposure to self- and other-Potentially Morally Injurious Events (PMIEs). Our study explored the effects of nurses' memories of self- and other-PMIEs on occupational wellbeing and turnover intentions. Using an experimental design on a convenience sample of 634 Romanian nurses, we tested a conceptual model with PLS-SEM, finding adequate explanatory and predictive power. Memories of self- and other-PMIEs were uniquely associated with work engagement, burnout, and turnover intentions, compared to a control group. These relationships were mediated by the three basic psychological needs. Relatedness was more thwarted for memories of other-PMIEs, while competence and autonomy were more thwarted for memories of self-PMIEs. Perceived supervisor support weakened the indirect effect between type of PMIE and turnover intentions, through autonomy satisfaction, but not through burnout. Self-disclosure weakened the indirect effect between type of PMIE and turnover intentions, through autonomy satisfaction, and both burnout and work engagement. Our findings emphasize the need for different strategies in addressing the negative long-term effects of nurses' exposure to self- and other-PMIEs, according to the basic psychological need satisfaction and type of wellbeing indicator.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Protective Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0272597, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009689

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Attrition of the Nursing Workforce from low-and middle-income countries to high-resourced settings is a reality that has escalated in the current Coronavirus pandemic due to varied reasons. With increased job stress resulting from the pandemic, the Quality of Work-Life of the Nursing Workforce is affected, with its effect on poor quality care to the client. This study sought to assess the perception of the Nursing Workforce about the Quality of Work-Life, and the factors that predict turnover intention among nurses in the Kumasi Metropolis, Ghana. METHODS: A cross-sectional, descriptive design involving multiple centres was used. The participants were made up of 348 Registered Nurses working in primary, secondary, and tertiary healthcare in five (5) hospitals in the Kumasi Metropolis. Data collection was done using questionnaires adapted from the Work-Related Quality of Life Scale and the Turnover Intention Scale and analyzed using frequencies, mean, standard deviation, Pearson's Product Moment Correlation, and Multiple Regression. RESULTS: The Registered Nurses perceived Quality of Work-Life as low; with close to half of them having a turnover intention. All the domains of Quality of Work-Life of the Nursing Workforce significantly correlated with Turnover intentions. Regression analysis showed that the number of years in a healthcare setting, general well-being, job control and satisfaction, and working condition of the Registered Nurse significantly predicted their turnover intentions at the p-value of 0.05. CONCLUSION: The findings of the study have provided an understanding of the Quality of Work-Life, and factors that contribute to increased turnover intentions among the Nursing Workforce amid the COVID-19 pandemic. Healthcare systems must enrol in requisite programmes that provide psychological and social support through counselling to promote the Quality of Work-Life of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ghana/epidemiology , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Personnel Turnover , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workforce
5.
J Nurs Care Qual ; 37(4): 313-318, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2001515

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Staff shortages, reduced budgets, and high acuity of violent psychiatric patients can create challenges in psychiatric intensive care units (PICUs). LOCAL PROBLEM: Staffing of the psychiatric unit was based on patient census rather than evidence-based practices. METHODS: A pre-/postintervention design was used to examine changes in nursing satisfaction and patient outcomes as measured with the National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) survey results. INTERVENTIONS: A psychiatric specific acuity tool was implemented on the PICU of a Veterans Administration hospital. RESULTS: After an initial decrease related to the COVID-19 pandemic, total acuity and the total number of nurses remained relatively stable while the unit census declined. NDNQI survey results improved with the largest being a 52-percentile increase for the quality-of-care summary measure. CONCLUSIONS: An acuity tool can help standardize practice, determine fair patient assignments among staff, increase nurse satisfaction, and promote best practices for patient safety.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Patient Safety , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling
6.
Niger J Clin Pract ; 25(7): 1014-1020, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1954417

ABSTRACT

Background: Nurses were affected by this pandemic more than any other healthcare professionals because they were working on the frontline continuously. Aims: The current study explored how nurses who care for patients with COVID-19 assess this process which they experienced, how they coped with the process, and their psychological experiences. The study was conducted by reaching out to the nurses working at pandemic clinics using the snowball sampling method. A total of 40 nurses were interviewed using telephone. The study employed a descriptive qualitative approach. The data were obtained through telephonic interviews that were performed by the researcher using interview forms. Materials and Methods: The interview notes were analyzed using the content analysis method according to Colaizzi's phenomenological method. Results: As a result of the content analysis, four themes emerged with the following headings: Initial reactions, factors that made an adaptation to the period of pandemic challenging, factors that facilitated the adaptation, and what the period of pandemic taught. Conclusions: It is suggested for nurses that their rotation should be planned effectively, and their social support should be enhanced. They should be provided with adequate personal protective equipment and human resource planning should be improved until the end of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment
7.
Int J Nurs Pract ; 28(5): e13077, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1909385

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to assess the influence of perceived work environment, empowerment and psychological stress on job burnout among nurses working at the time of the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Nurses experienced high levels of job burnout during the pandemic, which impacted their mental health and well-being. Studies investigating the influence of work environment, empowerment and stress on burnout during the time of COVID-19 are limited. DESIGN: The study utilized a cross-sectional design. METHODS: Data were collected from 351 nurses in Oman between January and March 2021. The Maslach Burnout Inventory, the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index, the Conditions of Work Effectiveness Questionnaire and the Perceived Stress Scale were used to assess study variables. RESULTS: About two-thirds of the nurses (65.6%) reported high levels of job burnout. Nurse managers' ability, leadership and support; staffing and resources adequacy; and nurses' access to support were significant factors associated with a reduced level of burnout. CONCLUSION: Supporting nurses during the crisis, ensuring adequate staffing levels and providing sufficient resources are critical to lower job burnout. Creating a positive and empowered work environment is vital to enhance nurses' retention during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Front Public Health ; 10: 839600, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1903202

ABSTRACT

Background: While frontline nurses employ coping alternatives to help deal with occupational stress resulting from unprecedented challenges during the COVID-19 pandemic, their access to necessary resources is unclear. Objective: This study aims to explore nurses' mental health in Alabama hospitals during the COVID-19 outbreak and investigate the impact of organizational and community support on nurse stressor levels, physio-psychosocial responses, and coping strategies employed. Methods: A cross-sectional survey was developed to bridge our understanding of stress, support, and coping mechanisms and distributed to nurses working with COVID-19-infected patients in hospital settings in Alabama. A total of 232 frontline nurses responded to 79 items in four domains (stressors, physio-psychosocial symptoms, coping, and support) between May 6, 2020, and June 30, 2020. A two-way ANOVA, regression analysis, and mediation of effects were used to analyze the data. Results: This study found that both social support and use of coping strategies contributed to the reduction of physio-psychosocial symptoms. Differences were found in how older frontline nurses perceived the efficacy of social support and certain coping strategies. This study provides further evidence of the importance of organizational support in addressing the harmful physio-psychosocial symptoms experienced by nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Social Support
9.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 71: 103250, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1899752

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To illuminate patients' experiences of being a part of an liaison nurse support service focused on supporting recently transferred intensive care unit patients. RESEARCH METHODOLOGY/DESIGN: A qualitative inductive descriptive design including in-depth interviews was chosen. SETTING: A project including an liaison nurse support service-intervention was undertaken during a 16-week period at a University hospital in Sweden. The liaison nurse support service was available Monday-Friday 10 am - 6 pm and nurses visited the patient 1-4 times after transfer to the ward. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Of the 109 patients who were visited by the liaison nurse support service, 14 agreed to be interviewed about their experiences of the transfer. Data was analysed by inductive content analysis. FINDINGS: One overall theme, An advocate in a vulnerable situation emerged from the data. Four subthemes were identified: Ensures transfer of information between the intensive care unit and the general ward, Makes the circumstances understandable and coordinates between the care levels and Offers emotional support and stability in an uncertain situation. CONCLUSION: The liaison nurse support service contributed to ensuring accurate transfer of information, solved problems when the patient themselves did not have control or strength and provided emotional support.


Subject(s)
Nurse's Role , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Critical Care , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Patient Outcome Assessment , Qualitative Research
10.
Inquiry ; 59: 469580221094327, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846663

ABSTRACT

The study explored the experiences of intensive care unit nursing staff caring for COVID-19 patients who eventually died during the two first pandemic waves. We used - descriptive-qualitative-phenomenological. The findings included four main themes-the first vs the second COVID-19 waves, fighting for life and being unable to win, a chronicle of pre-determined death, and nurse's emotional coping with patient death. Based on these findings, we have concluded that in order to enhance nurses' mental health, policy makers and governments need to create an appropriate support system for them.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Critical Care Nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Nurs Adm Q ; 46(3): 245-254, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1831523

ABSTRACT

Researchers explored travel nurses' and permanent staff nurses' COVID-19 pandemic work experiences, seeking to understand, "How do these experiences influence nurses' motivation, happiness, stress, and career decisions?" The COVID-19 pandemic took a heavy physical and psychological toll on health care providers. Demand outweighed resources as nurses accepted the monumental task of caring for communities affected by the catastrophe. We aimed to gain insight into nurses' lived pandemic experiences in the United States, while exploring the impact of these experiences on their motives to remain in current positions or alter their career paths. In this descriptive, phenomenological study, interview data collected from 30 nurses were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Physical and emotional trauma experienced during the early and peak months of the pandemic led nurses to evaluate their current work arrangements and to ponder alternatives. Our results suggest that pandemic work environments contributed to a change in nursing workforce distribution and exacerbated widening nurse shortage gaps. A call to action bids leaders to institute retention measures based on factors influencing nurses' career trajectory decisions in the current environment. Our findings led to recommendations for leadership approaches to promote nurses' emotional healing and mental wellness.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , COVID-19/epidemiology , Happiness , Humans , Leadership , Motivation , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , United States
12.
J Nurs Manag ; 30(6): 1913-1921, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1816607

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this work is to examine staffing, personal protective equipment (PPE) adequacy and physical exhaustion that contributed to burnout and intent to leave among hospital nurses during the first peak of the COVID-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Burnout is associated with adverse nurse and patient outcomes. Identifying the magnitude of burnout that occurred during the pandemic can prepare managers for the long-term mental health effects on nurses. METHODS: A cross-sectional, electronic survey was administered to examine perceptions of burnout and intent to leave among all New Jersey hospital nurses from October 6 to October 26, 2020. RESULTS: A total of 3030 nurses responded with 64.3% reporting burnout and 36.5% reporting intent to leave the hospital within a year. There was a significant association between high levels of burnout and intent to leave (χ2  = 329.4; p = .001). There was no association between staffing and burnout; however, reporting inadequate PPE (OR = 1.77 [95% CI: 1.34-2.34]) and physical exhaustion (OR = 3.89 [95% CI: 3.19-4.76]) remained predictors of burnout among nurses. CONCLUSION: Inadequate PPE and physical exhaustion coupled with short staffing contributed to burnout and intent to leave. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING MANAGEMENT: Managers should continue to utilize evidence-based mental health interventions and advocate within their nursing professional organizations for relief funds to reduce burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/complications , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Fatigue/complications , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , New Jersey/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology
13.
Int J Med Inform ; 163: 104783, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1814526

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impacts of electronic medical record implementation on nurses, the largest healthcare workforce, have not been comprehensively examined. Negative impacts on nurses have implications for quality of patient care delivery and workforce retention. OBJECTIVE: To investigate changes in nurses' well-being, intention to stay, burnout, work engagement, satisfaction, motivation and experience using technology pre- and post-implementation of an organisation-wide electronic medical record in Victoria, Australia. METHODS: The natural experiment comprised an electronic medical record system implementation across six hospitals of a large tertiary healthcare organisation. Cross-sectional surveys were collected pre-electronic medical record implementation prior to the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic in 2019, and 18-months post-electronic medical record implementation during the pandemic in 2020, and findings compared. RESULTS: A total of 942 surveys were analysed (550 pre-electronic medical record (response rate 15.52%) and 392 post-electronic medical record (response rate 9.50%)). Post-electronic medical record, nurses' work satisfaction (r = 0.23, p=<0.001), intention to stay (r = 0.11, p = 0.001) and well-being (r = 0.17, p=<0.001) decreased. Nurses' perceived competence increased (r = 0.10, p = 0.002) despite decreased autonomy (r = 0.10, p = 0.003). Two of three dimensions of work engagement worsened (vigour r = 0.13, p=<0.001; dedication r = 0.13, p=<0.001) and all dimensions of burnout increased (exhaustion r = 0.08, p = 0.012, cynicism r = 0.07, p = 0.04 and reduced efficiency r = 0.32, p=<0.001). Nurses reported more burnout symptoms (95% CI 4.6-4.7%, p = 0.036), were less engaged (95% CI 49.6-49.9%, p=<0.001) and career trajectory satisfaction decreased (r = 0.15, p=<0.001). Matched data from 52 nurses showed changes in the same direction for all items except career trajectory satisfaction, hence validated findings from the larger unmatched sample. CONCLUSIONS: Implementation of an electronic medical record immediately followed by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic was associated with negative changes in nurses' well-being, intention to stay, burnout, work engagement and satisfaction.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Victoria
14.
Int Nurs Rev ; 69(4): 470-483, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1807110

ABSTRACT

AIM: To explore interventions and coping strategies used to treat the psychological symptoms associated with compassion fatigue among nurses. BACKGROUND: The rapid transmission of infectious diseases (e.g., COVID-19) has put nurses, around the world, at high risk of developing profound psychological health issues due to compassion fatigue. If unrelieved, compassion fatigue can lead to catastrophic psychological symptoms such as depression, stress, anxiety, and insomnia, negatively impacting patient care. This necessitates interventions to prevent or mitigate the psychological symptoms of compassion fatigue. METHOD: Following Whittemore and Knafl's integrative review method, the literature search comprised three databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE-OVID, and Scopus. RESULTS: The 11 included studies were categorized into four themes: (1) using relaxation strategies, (2) neutralizing emotional trauma, (3) enhancing nurses' preparedness for confronting disasters, and (4) educating nurses about coping strategies to manage their psychological issues. CONCLUSION: Researchers studied several coping strategies and interventions. There is a need for policymakers' support and hospital-level interventions. Early interventions may prevent or relieve psychological issues. IMPLICATIONS: The findings have implications for hospital leaders around the world to initiate interventions that teach nurses strategies to cope with stressful events. Future researchers might consider long-term supports and multiple interventions that target several leading causes of psychological symptoms among nurses before, during, and after high-stress situations. Policymakers around the world could use the findings to initiate policies to facilitate nurses' access to needed resources, hence protecting their mental health and increasing the quality of patient care.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Compassion Fatigue , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Humans , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Disease Outbreaks
15.
J Nurs Adm ; 52(3): E9-E11, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1769460

ABSTRACT

Because of the pandemic's impact on morbidity and mortality, nursing leaders have witnessed a marked increase in the number of staff who experience crisis and extreme stress during their shift. This hospital's Engagement and Resilience Council aimed to mediate this stress by implementing resilience-building interventions during moments of peaked stress. Preliminary data show these interventions may markedly improve stress levels in frontline caregivers by up to 52% in some clinical settings.


Subject(s)
Crisis Intervention/methods , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/therapy , Humans , Shared Governance, Nursing
16.
PLoS One ; 17(3): e0263603, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1745323

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Burnout is a work-related stress syndrome characterized by emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and reduced personal accomplishment. Nurse burnout is related to nurses' deteriorating mental health and poorer patient care quality and thus, is a significant concern in healthcare. The Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has swept the world and distressed the healthcare systems. Because of the body's stress mechanism, it is vital to examine the current prevalence of nurse burnout and understand it at a biological level, using an epigenetic biomarker, telomere length. PURPOSE: To determine the prevalence of burnout among nurses in the Peri-Operative and Labor & Delivery settings pre and during the COVID-19 pandemic and to examine the effects of burnout on absolute telomere length. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional study assessing the prevalence of nurses' burnout and the relationships between nurses' burnout and telomere length. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, we had to stop the study during the mid of data collection. Even though the study was not designed to capture changes before and during the pandemic, we analyzed two groups' data before and during the pandemic. The study took place in a US hospital. Nurses in the hospital's Operating Room, Post-Anesthesia Care Unit, and Labor & Delivery Unit participated in the study. Maslach Burnout Inventory survey and nurses' demographics were administered online. Telomere length was measured via finger-prick blood. RESULTS: 146 nurses participated in the study, with 120 participants' blood samples collected. The high-level burnout rate was 70.5%. Correlation analysis did not reveal a direct correlation between nurse burnout and telomere length. However, in a multiple regression analysis, the final model contained the burnout subscale of emotional exhaustion, years as an RN, and work unit's nursing care quality. There was a low degree of departure from normality of the mean absolute telomere length in the pre-pandemic group and a substantial degree of departure in the during-pandemic group. CONCLUSIONS: Nurse burnout is a prevalent phenomenon in healthcare, and this study indicates that nurses currently experience high levels of burnout. Nurses' cellular biomarker, telomere length, is shorter in the group of nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic than before. Appropriate measures should be implemented to decrease nurses' burnout symptoms and improve nurses' psychological and physical health. Nurses, especially those younger than 60, report higher burnout symptoms, particularly emotional exhaustion. This study indicates the need for intervention to promote nurses' health during the pandemic and beyond. If not appropriately managed, nurse burnout may continue to be a significant issue facing the healthcare system.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Telomere/genetics , Adult , Burnout, Professional/genetics , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/psychology , Clinical Competence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Quality of Health Care , Regression Analysis , Telomere Homeostasis , Young Adult
17.
J Health Organ Manag ; ahead-of-print(ahead-of-print)2021 Aug 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1722823

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Nurses working during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic have reported elevated levels of anxiety, burnout and sleep disruption. Hospital administrators are in a unique position to mitigate or exacerbate stressful working conditions. The goal of this study was to capture the recommendations of nurses providing frontline care during the pandemic. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: Semi-structured interviews were conducted during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, with 36 nurses living in Canada and working in Canada or the United States. FINDINGS: The following recommendations were identified from reflexive thematic analysis of interview transcripts: (1) The nurses emphasized the need for a leadership style that embodied visibility, availability and careful planning. (2) Information overload contributed to stress, and participants appealed for clear, consistent and transparent communication. (3) A more resilient healthcare supply chain was required to safeguard the distribution of equipment, supplies and medications. (4) Clear communication of policies related to sick leave, pay equity and workload was necessary. (5) Equity should be considered, particularly with regard to redeployment. (6) Nurses wanted psychological support offered by trusted providers, managers and peers. PRACTICAL IMPLICATIONS: Over-reliance on employee assistance programmes and other individualized approaches to virtual care were not well-received. An integrative systems-based approach is needed to address the multifaceted mental health outcomes and reduce the deleterious impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the nursing workforce. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: Results of this study capture the recommendations made by nurses during in-depth interviews conducted early in the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Health Services , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Canada , Communication , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Leadership , Male , Needs Assessment , Organizational Policy , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Sick Leave , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , United States , Workload
18.
Nurs Forum ; 57(4): 650-657, 2022 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1714292

ABSTRACT

AIM: The aim of this study was to evaluate the experiences of nurses providing care to intensive care unit patients diagnosed with coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Turkey. METHODS: The research employed the descriptive phenomenological approach. The interviews were analyzed with Colaizzi's seven-step method. RESULTS: The experiences of nurses providing care to COVID-19 patients in the intensive care unit can be summarized under three themes. It was determined that all nurses experience physical, psychological, and social difficulties along with negative emotions during the care process for COVID-19 patients, for which nurses use coping processes. CONCLUSION: This study shows the difficulties faced by nurses who provide intensive care to patients with COVID-19. It is important to identify these challenges early to protect and improve the health of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Adaptation, Psychological , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Qualitative Research
19.
Creat Nurs ; 28(1): 7-16, 2022 Feb 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1690613

ABSTRACT

The psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on nurses, and subsequent increases in turnover, have been extensively documented. This article examines a profile of nurses which included (1) the degree to which direct-care nurses are caring for themselves, (2) the degree to which their manager acts in a caring way, (3) the degree to which nurses have clarity about their professional role and about how the system works, and (4) the degree to which nurses are satisfied with essential social and technical dimensions of their jobs, to help understand how some of the critical internal states and working relationships of nurses fit together as a model. To test the model, authors used structural equation modeling with a 35-item measurement tool in three countries (Russia, Serbia, and Turkey; n = 984), replicating a recent 8-country study. Results revealed a good model fit, similar to the original study, despite statistically significant differences in mean scores between the countries studied. Good model fit with a second group of countries, despite differences in mean scores, suggests that results from both studies can be used for a global conversation about how caring, clarity, and job satisfaction in nursing relate to one another. These results provide evidence that health facilities should study variables such as caring for self, caring by the unit or department manager, clarity of role and system, and job satisfaction to learn about, recover, and monitor nurses' health and experience of work as they emerge from the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Nurs Clin North Am ; 57(1): 131-141, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1668793

ABSTRACT

The levels of burnout nurses experience continue to increase with resultant negative impacts on the nursing work environment, patient outcomes, and the retention of qualified nurses. Nurse leaders are essential in developing and fostering positive work environments that retain an empowered and motivated workforce. Research indicates that positive and relational leadership styles can improve nurses' job satisfaction, organizational commitment, and retention while concurrently reducing emotional exhaustion and burnout.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Leadership , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Workplace/psychology
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