Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 56
Filter
Add filters

Document Type
Year range
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 17(22)2020 11 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456323

ABSTRACT

Skill mix refers to the number and educational experience of nurses working in clinical settings. Authors have used several measures to determine the skill mix, which includes nurse-to-patient ratio and the proportion of baccalaureate-prepared nurses. Observational studies have tested the association between nursing skill mix and patient outcomes (mortality). To date, this body of research has not been subject to systematic review or meta-analysis. The aim of this study is to systematically review and meta-analyse observational and experimental research that tests the association between nursing skill mix and patient mortality in medical and surgical settings. We will search four key electronic databases-MEDLINE [OVID], EMBASE [OVID], CINAHL [EBSCOhost], and ProQuest Central (five databases)-from inception. Title, abstract, and full-text screening will be undertaken independently by at least two researchers using COVIDENCE review management software. We will include studies where the authors report an association between nursing skill mix and outcomes in adult medical and surgical inpatients. Extracted data from included studies will consist measures of nursing skill mix and inpatient mortality outcomes. A meta-analysis will be undertaken if there are at least two studies with similar designs, exposures, and outcomes. The findings will inform future research and workforce planning in health systems internationally.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff, Hospital , Patients , Adult , Databases, Factual , General Surgery/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Nursing Staff, Hospital/standards , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Patients/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/statistics & numerical data , Workforce/statistics & numerical data
4.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 301, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, renal healthcare practitioners provide intensive and protracted support to a highly complex multi-morbid patient population however knowledge about the impact of COVID-19 on these practitioners is extremely limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the experiences of COVID-19 with renal healthcare practitioners during the first global lockdown between June 2020 and September 2020. METHODS: A multi-methods approach was carried out including a quantitative survey and qualitative interviews. This was a multinational study of renal healthcare practitioners from 29 countries. Quantitative: A self-designed survey on COVID-19 experiences and standardised questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire-12; Maslach Burnout Inventory). Descriptive statistics were generated for numerical data. Qualitative: Online semi-structured interviews were conducted. Data was subjected to thematic analysis. Renal healthcare practitioners (n = 251) completed an online survey. Thirteen renal healthcare practitioners took part in semi-structured interviews (12 nurses and 1 dietician). RESULTS: The majority of participants surveyed were female (86.9 %; n = 218), nurses (86.9 %; n = 218) with an average 21.5 (SD = 11.1) years' experience since professional qualification, and 16.3 years (SD = 9.3) working in renal healthcare. Survey responses indicated a level of preparedness, training and satisfactory personal protective equipment during the pandemic however approximately 40.3 % experienced fear about attending work, and 49.8 % experienced mental health distress. The highest prevalence of burnout was emotional exhaustion (35.9 %). Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis highlighting the holistic complexities in managing renal healthcare, a neglected specialist workforce, and the need for appropriate support at work during a pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results have highlighted the psychological impact, in terms of emotional exhaustion and mental health distress in our sample of renal healthcare practitioners. As the pandemic has continued, it is important to consider the long-term impact on an already stretched workforce including the risk of developing mental health disorders. Future research and interventions are required to understand and improve the provision of psychological support for specialist medical and nursing personnel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Nephrology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrology Nursing/economics , Nephrology Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychological Distress , Qualitative Research , Workforce
5.
Rev Esp Quimioter ; 34(3): 214-219, 2021 Jun.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390022

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Proper hand hygiene is the main measure in the prevention and control of infection associated with healthcare. It describes how the pandemic period of 2020 has influenced the evolution of the degree of compliance with hand hygiene practices in health professionals at the Hospital Universitario Insular de Gran Canaria with respect to previous years. METHODS: Descriptive cross-sectional study of direct observation on compliance with the five moments of hand hygiene in the 2018-2020 period. Adherence is described with the frequency distribution of the different moments in which it was indicated. RESULTS: Total adherence has increased from 42.5% in 2018, to 47.6% in 2019, and 59.2% in 2020 (p <0.05). Total adherence was greater in the moments after contact with the patient (67%) than in the moments before contact (48%). The area with the highest adherence was dialysis (83%). There is a greater adherence in open areas than in hospitalization areas (65% vs 56%). Higher adherence was determined in physicians (73%) and nurses (74%), than in nursing assistants (50%) (p<0.05). CONCLUSIONS: In 2020 there was an increase in adherence to hand hygiene compared to previous years. A higher percentage of adherence was determined in physicians and nurses than in nursing assistants. We consider that the current SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has played a relevant role in this increase in adherence.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Hand Hygiene/trends , Health Personnel , Pandemics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hand Hygiene/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/trends , Humans , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Medical Staff, Hospital/trends , Nursing Assistants/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Assistants/trends , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/trends , Spain , Tertiary Care Centers
6.
Epidemiol Infect ; 149: e172, 2021 08 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1349631

ABSTRACT

Although the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic is lasting for more than 1 year, the exposition risks of health-care providers are still unclear. Available evidence is conflicting. We investigated the prevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in the staff of a large public hospital with multiple sites in the Antwerp region of Belgium. Risk factors for infection were identified by means of a questionnaire and human resource data. We performed hospital-wide serology tests in the weeks following the first epidemic wave (16 March to the end of May 2020) and combined the results with the answers from an individual questionnaire. Overall seroprevalence was 7.6%. We found higher seroprevalences in nurses [10.0%; 95% confidence interval (CI) 8.9-11.2] than in physicians 6.4% (95% CI 4.6-8.7), paramedical 6.0% (95% CI 4.3-8.0) and administrative staff (2.9%; 95% CI 1.8-4.5). Staff who indicated contact with a confirmed coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) colleague had a higher seroprevalence (12.0%; 95% CI 10.7-13.4) than staff who did not (4.2%; 95% CI 3.5-5.0). The same findings were present for contacts in the private setting. Working in general COVID-19 wards, but not in emergency departments or intensive care units, was also a significant risk factor. Since our analysis points in the direction of active SARS-CoV-2 transmission within hospitals, we argue for implementing a stringent hospital-wide testing and contact-tracing policy with special attention to the health care workers employed in general COVID-19 departments. Additional studies are needed to establish the transmission dynamics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Belgium/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Cross Infection/epidemiology , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Female , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
7.
Prim Care Companion CNS Disord ; 23(2)2021 03 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231534

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of depression, anxiety, and insomnia among hospital staff working in a tertiary care private hospital in India during the early period of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted May 5-25, 2020, among 347 hospital staff (nursing and other hospital staff, with the exception of doctors). Depression, anxiety, and insomnia were measured using the 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire, the 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder Scale, and the Insomnia Severity Index, respectively. RESULTS: Of respondents, 16.4% reported clinically significant depression, 13.8% reported clinically significant anxiety, and 13.3% reported insomnia. Among the nursing staff, 20.9% reported clinically significant depression, 15.9% reported clinically significant anxiety, and 17.0% reported insomnia. There was significantly higher depression (P = .000), anxiety (P = .002), and insomnia (P = .007) among nursing staff compared with other hospital staff in 2-tailed t tests. There was a significantly higher prevalence of insomnia among females (χ2 = 5.85, df = 2, P = .05). CONCLUSIONS: Study results show that more than 1 in 10 hospital staff suffer from mental health conditions, even during the beginning of the pandemic, and there is a need for active psychiatric support for the hospital staff during this pandemic. Depression, anxiety, and insomnia are significantly higher among nurses compared to other hospital staff. The results of this research suggest that comprehensive support measures should be implemented to protect and maintain mental health of hospital staff, especially nurses, while fighting the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Hospitals, Private/statistics & numerical data , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Tertiary Care Centers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
9.
Adv Skin Wound Care ; 34(7): 356-363, 2021 Jul 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1191097

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the relationship between wearing protective masks and goggles and skin injuries in medical staff during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Researchers conducted a cross-sectional, multicenter online survey. Respondents voluntarily completed the questionnaire on their smartphones. Ordinal and multinomial logistic regressions were used to identify factors related to skin injuries. RESULTS: In total, 1,611 respondents wore protective masks combined with goggles in 145 hospitals in China; 1,281 skin injuries were reported (overall prevalence, 79.5%). Multiple concomitant skin injuries (68.5%) and injuries in four anatomic locations (24.0%) were the most common, followed by injuries in three (22.8%), two (21.7%), and one location (11.0%). Multinomial logistic regression indicated that sweating increased the risk of injuries in one to four anatomic locations (95% confidence interval for odds ratio 16.23-60.02 for one location and 38.22-239.04 for four locations), and wearing an N95 mask combined with goggles and a daily use longer than 4 hours increased the risk of injuries in four locations (95% confidence interval for odds ratio 1.18-5.31 and 1.14-3.93, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of skin injuries among medical staff wearing protective masks combined with goggles was very high. These were mainly device-related pressure injuries, moisture-associated skin damage, and skin tears. The combination of various factors resulted in skin injuries at multiple sites. Preventing and managing sweating should be a focus for medical staff who wear protective masks combined with goggles for more than 4 hours.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Eye Protective Devices/adverse effects , Masks/adverse effects , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Injuries/etiology , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Facial Injuries/etiology , Humans , Internet , Male , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Pressure Ulcer/etiology , Sweating
10.
Psychiatr Q ; 92(4): 1381-1391, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160282

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an ongoing worldwide infectious disease pandemic. The purpose of this study was to investigate post-traumatic stress and related factors among hospital nurses during the COVID-19 outbreak. The subjects of this study were 300 nurses who worked in three general hospitals that operated National Designated Isolation Unit (NDIU) wards during the COVID-19 outbreak. Self-reporting questionnaires were used to collect data on post-traumatic stress, general characteristics, and work-related information. The average post-traumatic stress score was 20.68 ± 19.5 points and 36.7% of participants were at high risk of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). The odds ratio (OR) for PTSD was higher for nurses who worked in the NDIU ward (OR = 16.31, 95% CI = 3.79-70.32), who responded that nurse staffing was poor (OR = 3.03, 95% CI = 1.01-9.10), and who responded that they experienced COVID-19 symptoms (OR = 3.83, 95% CI = 1.89-7.75). Total 36.7% of nurses were at risk of PTSD and the factors related to PTSD were the work department, nurse staffing, and experiencing COVID-19 symptoms. These results could be used to manage PTSD and provide psychological support of nurses during infectious disease epidemics, such as COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disease Outbreaks , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Female , Humans , Male , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Young Adult
11.
Occup Med (Lond) ; 71(3): 131-135, 2021 06 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147991

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses who are one of the pivotal elements of countries' strategic responses to COVID-19 are being exposed to COVID-19. AIMS: To investigate the underlying characteristics of nurses who died due to COVID-19. METHODS: On 1 September 2020, a grey literature search was conducted. Data obtained through Medscape, Google, PubMed, government and non-government websites. The search strategy was carried out using variants and combinations of keywords related to 'nurse' and 'COVID-19' in English. Abstracted data included age, gender, type of nurse, department of nursing, country, date of death and publication characteristics. RESULTS: Out of reported 1518 COVID-19-related nurse deaths, details of age, gender and department of nursing were available for 766 (50%), 945 (62%) and 153 (10%) of nurses, respectively. The median age of the nurses was 56 years. The majority of deaths were reported in the 46- to 65 (32%)-year age range. While the registered nurses had the highest number of deaths according to types of nurses (680/957; 71%), they are mental health nurses (42/153; 28%) in the department of nursing. The countries with the most reported nurse deaths were USA, South Africa, Mexico and Russia. CONCLUSIONS: The predominance of deceased mental health nurses among nursing departments can be examined in future studies. Supportive health policies can be developed to increase the motivation of nurses.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2
13.
J Wound Care ; 30(3): 162-170, 2021 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138941

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to determine the impact of a specially designed care bundle on the development of facial pressure injuries (PI) among frontline healthcare workers wearing personal protective equipment (PPE) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The primary outcome of interest was the incidence of facial PIs. The secondary outcomes of interest were facial pain while wearing PPE and ease of use of the care bundle. METHODS: This study used a voluntary survey by questionnaire, supplemented by a qualitative analysis of interviews from a small purposive sample that took place in one large Irish hospital over a two-month period in 2020. The hospital was a city-based public university teaching hospital with 800 inpatient beds. The intervention was a care bundle consisting of skin protection, face mask selection, material use, skin inspection, cleansing and hydration developed in line with international best practice guidelines. All staff working in COVID-19 wards, intensive care units and the emergency department in the hospital were given a kitbag containing the elements of the care bundle plus an information pamphlet. Data were collected via a survey and interviews. RESULTS: A total of 114 staff provided feedback on the use of the care bundle. Before using the care bundle 29% (n=33) of the respondents reported developing a facial PI, whereas after using the care bundle only 8% (n=9) of the respondents reported developing a facial PI. The odds ratio (OR) of skin injury development was 4.75 (95% confidence interval (CI): 2.15-10.49; p=0.0001), suggesting that after the care bundle was issued, those who responded to the survey were almost five times less likely to develop a skin injury. Interviews with 14 staff determined that the bundle was easy to use and safe. CONCLUSION: Among those who responded to the survey, the use of the bundle was associated with a reduction in the incidence of skin injury from 29% to 8%, and respondents found the bundle easy to use, safe and effective. As with evidence from the international literature, this study has identified that when skincare is prioritised, and a systematic preventative care bundle approach is adopted, there are clear benefits for the individuals involved.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Facial Injuries/etiology , Medical Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Injuries/etiology , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Facial Injuries/prevention & control , Humans , Masks/adverse effects , Occupational Injuries/prevention & control
15.
J Clin Nurs ; 30(9-10): 1360-1371, 2021 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1083971

ABSTRACT

AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of anxiety, sleep disorders and self-efficacy and their predicting factors among nurses facing COVID-19. BACKGROUND: The spread of COVID-19 throughout the world determined a series of modifications of several National Health Service organisations, with a potential series of psychological consequences among nurses, who were particularly afflicted by this situation of changes and precariousness. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study was carried out from February-April 2020. METHODS: A total of 1,005 nurses employed in different Italian hospital wards, during the COVID-19 pandemic, were recruited. Analyses were based on descriptive statistics and multivariate logistic regression. The STROBE checklist for cross-sectional studies was used in this study. RESULTS: The prevalence of sleep disturbances, moderate anxiety and low self-efficacy was 71.4%, 33.23% and 50.65%, respectively. We found a positive correlation between anxiety and sleep quality (0.408; p < .0001) and negative correlations between self-efficacy and anxiety (-0.217; p < .0001) and sleep quality and self-efficacy (-0.134; p < .0001). The factor independently associated with all variables was gender. Females were more prone to sleep disturbances, anxiety and low levels of self-efficacy than males (p < .05). CONCLUSIONS: The prevalence of anxiety, sleep disorders and low self-efficacy among Italian nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic was high. Healthcare managers should recognise and consider these results to reduce the risk of the onset of major mental problems that could result in post-traumatic stress disorder. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Nurses facing major incidents as COVID-19 pandemic are among healthcare personnel exposed to a high risk to develop psychological disturbance that should be assessed and recognised, in order to find helpful coping strategies to inform support services and avoid to hesitate in post-traumatic stress disorders.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Self Efficacy , Sleep Wake Disorders , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Sex Distribution , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology
16.
J Nurs Adm ; 51(3): E6-E12, 2021 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1078886

ABSTRACT

This article discusses the crucial role and dearth of critical care nurses in the United States highlighted during the COVID-19 pandemic. This challenge of sufficient critical care nursing resources existed before the pandemic, but now concern is heightened by the need for such crucial healthcare providers now and in the future. We present strategies to address the gap, as well as challenges inherent in the suggested approaches. The discussion is relevant as nurse leaders adapt to COVID-19 and other novel challenges in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Critical Care Nursing/standards , Critical Care Nursing/trends , Nursing Staff, Hospital/supply & distribution , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Adult , Critical Care Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Female , Forecasting , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
17.
Appl Nurs Res ; 58: 151410, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1077769

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to assess the post-contact risk of nurses who provide care for patients diagnosed with COVID-19. METHODS: This investigation employed a quantitative-descriptive design. The study sample was comprised of the frontline nurses in the COVID-19 center hospitals in the northern part of Saudi Arabia. Snowball sampling was used, resulting in 80 frontline nurses. A survey using a self-administered questionnaire in a Google form was employed to collect the data, which was collected from May 20 through June 25, 2020. RESULTS: Some of the study participants were reported to have a history of both staying in the same household with each other (35%) and of traveling with a confirmed COVID-19 patient (20%). These participants were considered as community exposed to COVID-19. There were 8.8% who were classified as high risk due to failure in removing and replacing personal protective equipment (PPE); 6.3% were at high risk for not performing hand hygiene before and after touching COVID-19 patients, and 5% did not follow the recommended guidelines in performing hand hygiene after touching the patients' surroundings. In addition, 3.8% of the participants had an accident related to biological material, such as with splashes of biological fluid (in the eyes). These nurses were classified as high risk for COVID-19 virus infection, CONCLUSION: This study identifies practices that need improvement in combatting this virus. Since policies and guidelines may not always be optimal in all settings, a tailor-fitted guideline is appropriate. Nurse leaders, for example, need to establish an infection control system that provides real-time monitoring and facilitates immediate correction for nurses. Doing so will provide the nurses with a continuous awareness of predisposing themselves to acquiring the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Care/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
18.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(2): 136-146, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1071833

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic highlighted nurses' compassionate presence during stressful conditions. Strategies to reduce workplace stress are needed. PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate a stress reduction strategy, an Internet-based Mantram Repetition Program (MRP), for nurses caring for hospitalized Veterans. METHODS: A one group pre-/post-test design was used to assess change in nurses' perceived outcomes after participating in the MRP. A post-test-only design was used to assess hospitalized Veterans' perceptions of nursing presence and satisfaction with care. Qualitative interviews were used to supplement quantitative data. FINDINGS: Patients perceived high levels of presence and satisfaction with care. Post MRP, nurses perceived increased mindfulness, compassion satisfaction, spiritual well-being, and nursing presence. Increased mindfulness was associated with greater compassion satisfaction and less burnout. DISCUSSION: For nurses working on the front lines of patient care, the potential for experiencing stress and burnout is a reality. Participating in a MRP could lessen these effects and facilitate nursing presence.


Subject(s)
Internet-Based Intervention , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Patient-Centered Care/organization & administration , Spiritual Therapies , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Empathy , Female , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Male , Middle Aged , Mindfulness , Nursing Evaluation Research , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction/statistics & numerical data , Qualitative Research , Veterans/psychology , Young Adult
19.
Int Nurs Rev ; 67(4): 466-475, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1066699

ABSTRACT

AIM: To compare presenteeism levels among three samples of nurses and to identify the relationship between presenteeism and sociodemographic and professional characteristics. BACKGROUND: Presenteeism (going to work ill) is a phenomenon studied from different perspectives, and it has become especially important during the current COVID-19 outbreak; its connection to high healthcare costs, patient safety breaches and negative nurse well-being has been proved. INTRODUCTION: The nursing profession is particularly associated with caring for the culture of teamwork, loyalty to colleagues and professional identity. This condition enhances the 'super nurse phenomenon', even though nurses do not feel physically and psychologically able to work. METHODS: A multicentre, cross-sectional study was conducted in three different country contexts: Oviedo (Spain), Porto (Portugal) and São Paulo (Brazil). Nurses performing functions in hospitals and primary health care were enrolled. Informed consent and data collection questionnaires were hand delivered. The Stanford Presenteeism Scale-6 was applied. RESULTS: A total of 659 nurses participated. Portuguese nurses showed greater prevalence of presenteeism, followed by Brazilian and Spanish nurses. Younger nurses with less professional experience presented lower levels of presenteeism but greater psychological commitment. Male participants showed lower capacity to complete work when ill than female participants. CONCLUSIONS: Age and length of professional experience proved to be significant predictors of total presenteeism, although only professional experience revealed statistical significance in the adjusted model. IMPLICATIONS FOR NURSING AND HEALTH POLICY: The knowledge of this phenomenon among nurses highlights the need for the development of strategies in the curriculum of nursing students and organizations. Resilience and ergonomic training should be applied in the training programmes of the students and reinforced by the health centre managers. It is essential that healthcare systems design worksite wellness programmes that pursue greater physical and mental well-being for healthcare professionals.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Presenteeism/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Age Factors , Brazil , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Portugal , Risk Factors , Spain
20.
Nurs Outlook ; 69(1): 6-12, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065514

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During an epidemic of a novel infectious disease, frontline nurses suffer from unprecedented psychological stress. This study aimed to assess the immediate psychological impact on frontline nurses in China. METHODS: A multicenter, cross-sectional survey of frontline nurses was conducted via online questionnaires. Symptoms of depression, anxiety, somatic disorders, and suicidal ideation were evaluated. Demographic, stress, and support variables were entered into logistic regression analysis to identify the impact factors. FINDINGS: Of the 4,692 nurses who completed the survey, 9.4% (n = 442) were considered to have depressive symptoms, 8.1% (n = 379) represented anxiety, and 42.7% (n = 2,005) had somatic symptom. About 6.5% (n = 306) respondents had suicidal ideation. DISCUSSION: The study showed that the overall mental health of frontline nurses was generally poor during COVID-19 outbreak, and several impact factors associated with nurses' psychological health were identified. Further research is needed to ascertain whether training and support strategies are indeed able to mitigate psychological morbidities.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Somatoform Disorders/epidemiology , Suicidal Ideation , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...