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2.
PLoS One ; 16(3): e0249098, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1477519

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nursing homes (NH) for the elderly have been particularly affected by the Covid-19 pandemic mainly due to their hosted vulnerable populations and poor outbreak preparedness. In Belgium, the medical humanitarian organization Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) implemented a support project for NH including training on infection prevention and control (IPC), (re)-organization of care, and psychosocial support for NH staff. As psychosocial and mental health needs of NH residents in times of Covid-19 are poorly understood and addressed, this study aimed to better understand these needs and how staff could respond accordingly. METHODS: A qualitative study adopting thematic content analysis. Eight focus group discussions with direct caring staff and 56 in-depth interviews with residents were conducted in eight purposively and conveniently selected NHs in Brussels, Belgium, June 2020. RESULTS: NH residents experienced losses of freedom, social life, autonomy, and recreational activities that deprived them of their basic psychological needs. This had a massive impact on their mental well-being expressed in feeling depressed, anxious, and frustrated as well as decreased meaning and quality of life. Staff felt unprepared for the challenges posed by the pandemic; lacking guidelines, personal protective equipment and clarity around organization of care. They were confronted with professional and ethical dilemmas, feeling 'trapped' between IPC and the residents' wellbeing. They witnessed the detrimental effects of the measures imposed on their residents. CONCLUSION: This study revealed the insights of residents' and NH staff at the height of the early Covid-19 pandemic. Clearer outbreak plans, including psychosocial support, could have prevented the aggravated mental health conditions of both residents and staff. A holistic approach is needed in NHs in which tailor-made essential restrictive IPC measures are combined with psychosocial support measures to reduce the impact on residents' mental health impact and to enhance their quality of life.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Quality of Life , Vulnerable Populations/psychology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/virology , Depression/etiology , Female , Focus Groups , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Middle Aged , Nursing Homes , Personal Autonomy , Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Nurs Manag (Harrow) ; 28(4): 36-40, 2021 Aug 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399611

ABSTRACT

On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization declared that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was a pandemic. As the COVID-19 pandemic has developed there have been many parallels made with other pandemics and epidemics, such as the 1918 influenza A (H1N1) pandemic and the 2003 severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) epidemic. This article discusses the challenges experienced by healthcare staff working during COVID-19, and the lessons that can be learned, such as the enhanced support required for staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Mental Health , Nursing Staff/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Social Support , Students, Nursing/psychology
6.
Nurs Stand ; 36(11): 45-50, 2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1395276

ABSTRACT

Nurses are likely to encounter a wide range of distressing, challenging and sometimes traumatic situations. However, the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has created unprecedented levels of stress, risk, uncertainty and anxiety for nurses. Nurses have been working in highly challenging conditions, particularly on the front line of patient care, which has had adverse effects on their mental health and well-being. The challenges generated by the COVID-19 pandemic have called into question the notion of nursing being an innately resilient profession. Consequently, the pandemic has reinforced the need for individuals, teams and healthcare organisations to foster resilience in nurses. This article discusses the theoretical underpinnings of resilience, explains what resilience in nurses means, and describes the adverse effects of the pandemic on nurses' mental health and resilience. The article also explores how nurses' resilience can be developed and enhanced from an individual and organisational perspective.


Subject(s)
Nursing Staff/psychology , Organizational Culture , Resilience, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19 , Health Workforce , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , United Kingdom
7.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(5): 292-299, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338900

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic altered traditional education models and school nursing practice during the 2020-2021 school year. As schools plan to reopen for the 2021-2022 school year, school nurses must arm themselves with the most recent evidence-based knowledge and tools to promote the health and safety of the school community. Schools will need to continue infection control measures and strategies to support the social emotional needs of students and staff to promote a safe and healthy learning environment on return to school. Partnered with local health departments, school nurses are vital to mitigation measures such as on-site viral testing and vaccination. A successful school year depends on strong nursing leadership.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Primary Prevention/standards , School Nursing/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology , Vaccination
9.
Res Gerontol Nurs ; 14(4): 180-190, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278554

ABSTRACT

The current study investigated the psychological well-being and coping mechanisms of care home staff during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) lockdown. Among 147 staff members, 21.8%, 24.5%, and 12.9% reported depression, anxiety, and stress, respectively. The results of structural equation modeling showed that self-efficacy and coping strategies had direct effects on psychological well-being. In the paths from self-perceived caregiving to psychological well-being, self-efficacy and positive coping strategies played mediating roles independently and together, and social support played a mediating role together with coping strategies. Care home staff's psychological well-being was undermined during the COVID-19 lockdown. Interventions aimed at improving staff's self-efficacy, adoption of positive coping strategies, and avoidance of negative coping strategies or considerations of social support along with coping strategies are suggested to decrease exhibited symptoms of depression, anxiety, and stress. [Research in Gerontological Nursing, 14(4), 180-190.].


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff/psychology , Physical Distancing , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Aged , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Humans , Latent Class Analysis , Male , Self Efficacy , Social Support
10.
J Christ Nurs ; 38(3): E25-E27, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262255

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: Compassion fatigue has become a more significant concern as nurses have cared for patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. The results of compassion fatigue are detrimental for both nurses and their patients. Both administrative and individual actions can be taken to assess, prevent, and deal with compassion fatigue. Spiritual facets of recognizing the potential for and managing the problem are presented.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Compassion Fatigue/psychology , Nurse-Patient Relations , Nursing Staff/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/nursing , Empathy , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Quality of Life
12.
Geriatr Nurs ; 42(4): 887-893, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1258372

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: First-line nursing staff are responsible for protecting residents, the most vulnerable population, from COVID-19 infections. They are at a high risk of being infected with COVID-19 and experience high levels of psychological distress. AIMS: To explore the challenges and coping strategies perceived by nursing staff during the COVID-19 pandemic in China. METHODS: In April,2020, we conducted a qualitative study using in-depth semi-structured interviews with nursing staff. Participants were selected from seven nursing homes in three cities in Hunan Province, China. RESULTS: A total of 21 nursing staff participated in the study, including seven nurse managers, seven registered nurses and seven nursing assistants. Three main themes were identified. Different groups encountered different sources of stress and adopted various coping strategies to fulfil their responsibilities. CONCLUSIONS: Nursing home staff were underprepared for dealing with COVID-19-related challenges. Educational programs to improve the ability to deal with COVID-19 prevention and control are needed.


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/psychology , Nursing Homes/organization & administration , Nursing Staff/psychology , Stress, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , China , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Pandemics , Perception , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
14.
NASN Sch Nurse ; 36(5): 276-283, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1181004

ABSTRACT

When the COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) pandemic led to school closures around the nation in March 2020, the role of the school nurse changed significantly, and it has continued to evolve as districts grapple with how to safely meet students' academic needs while also protecting the health of their communities. Nurses working for Santa Fe Public Schools in New Mexico have taken their new roles seriously and have been working closely with their district leaders, the New Mexico Department of Health, School Health Advocates, and the Public Education Department to facilitate evidence-based policies and procedures. Activities have included cohorting, contact tracing, resource development, education (of staff and families), planning and implementation of safety procedures, coordination of surveillance testing, and staff screening, along with finding new, COVID safe ways to provide standard school nursing services, including immunization administration, hearing and vision screening, teaching, and promoting wellness and mental health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Policy , Health Promotion/standards , Nursing Staff/psychology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , School Nursing/standards , Adolescent , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
15.
Hu Li Za Zhi ; 68(2): 92-98, 2021 Apr.
Article in Chinese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1168053

ABSTRACT

Cases in the current novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic continue to increase, bringing tremendous psychological pressures to frontline caregivers and threating the ability of existing medical care systems in many countries to cope with related demands. In this situation, nursing leaders have a heightened responsibility to assist nursing staff to remain at their jobs and feel secure, to strengthen safety systems, to provide adequate equipment and personnel training, and to proactively lead nursing staff. In this article, leadership strategies implemented under the COVID-19 pandemic are presented from the perspective of transformational leadership in nursing practice. This article is divided into the following five themes: 1. Leadership makes the vision more vivid; 2. Demonstrating charismatic leadership; 3. Leaders who stimulate intellectual potential; 4. Paying attention to spiritual inspiration; 5. Providing individualized sincere care. Leaders should promote the professional role of nursing staff and provide a safe and secure practice environment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Leadership , Nurse Administrators , Nursing Staff , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Humans , Nurse Administrators/psychology , Nursing Staff/organization & administration , Nursing Staff/psychology
16.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(4): 205-206, 2020 Apr.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156093

ABSTRACT

In this pandemic global emergency, self-care and psycho-physical wellbeing's programs for healthcare workers are an absolute priority. Now more than ever, physicians and nurses are facing abnormal burdens of work, stressful clinical and organizational conditions and emotional charges that are challenging their ability to cope and jeopardizing their own lives. By improving nutritional education in medical faculties, implementing healthy lifestyles promotion and burnout prevention projects in the hospitals, we will be able to maintain a good quality of care throughout these trying times and hopefully we will improve the selfcare strategies for health professionals for the next future.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Medical Staff/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Self Care , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotional Adjustment , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Life Style , Nutritional Support , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Workload
17.
Biosci Trends ; 15(2): 129-131, 2021 May 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1154738

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline nurses have faced extraordinary personal and professional challenges. These challenges have had mental health consequences, and concerning reports of burnout have emerged globally. We conducted a cross-sectional survey at a designated COVID-19 hospital in Shanghai at the peak of the pandemic, i.e. about 2 months after the onset of the outbreak from February to April 2020. Findings revealed burnout in 6.85% of nurses. Of 336 respondents, 87 (25.89%) had a high level of emotional exhaustion, 61 (18.15%) had a high level of depersonalization, and 100 (29.76%) had a low level of personal accomplishment. Burnout can be prevented by offering more support from families and supervisors, paying attention to health monitoring and personal protection, and creating a rational human resource allocation and shift management system. Specific training on infection control and self-protection, mental health guidance, and stress coping techniques must be implemented. As the current health crisis ultimately abates, moving the focus from mental health issues to public health issues, more attention and support at the national and organizational levels are needed to reduce occupational discrimination, nurse autonomy and status need to be promoted, and public health emergency teams need to be created. A positive and fair working environment is essential to effective healthcare delivery.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/nursing , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health , Public Health , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(5): 1140-1146, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1150156

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Presently a median of 37.5% of the U.S. skilled nursing facility (SNF) workforce has been vaccinated for COVID-19. It is essential to understand vaccine hesitancy among SNF workers to inform vaccine campaigns going forward. OBJECTIVE: To describe the concerns raised among healthcare workers and staff from SNFs during town hall meetings. DESIGN: Sixty-three SNFs from four corporations were invited to send Opinion Leaders, outspoken staff from nursing, nurse aid, dietary, housekeeping or recreational therapy, to attend a 1-h virtual town hall meeting. Meetings used a similar format where the moderator solicited concerns that the attendees themselves had or had heard from others in the facility about the COVID-19 vaccine. Physicians and moderators used personal stories to address concerns and reaffirmed positive emotions. SETTING: Twenty-six video town hall meetings with SNF staff. PARTICIPANTS: Healthcare workers and staff, with physicians serving as content experts. MEASUREMENT: Questions and comments about the COVID-19 vaccines noted by physicians. RESULTS: One hundred and ninety three staff from 50 facilities participated in 26 meetings between December 30, 2020 and January 15, 2021. Most staff reported getting information about the vaccine from friends or social media. Concerns about how rapidly the vaccines were developed and side effects, including infertility or pregnancy related concerns, were frequently raised. There were no differences in concerns raised by discipline. Questions about returning to prior activities after being vaccinated were common and offered the opportunity to build on positive emotions to reduce vaccine hesitancy. CONCLUSIONS: Misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine was widespread among SNF staff. Sharing positive emotions and stories may be more effective than sharing data when attempting to reduce vaccine hesitancy in SNF staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Nursing Staff/psychology , Skilled Nursing Facilities , Communication , Humans , Physicians/psychology , Vaccination Refusal/psychology
19.
Br J Nurs ; 30(4): 252-253, 2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110763

ABSTRACT

Emeritus Professor Alan Glasper, from the University of Southampton, discusses strategies being employed to alleviate stress among NHS staff during the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nursing Staff/psychology , Occupational Health , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , State Medicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , United Kingdom/epidemiology
20.
Br J Nurs ; 30(4): 210-217, 2021 Feb 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1110761

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During the COVID-19 pandemic, lymphoedema staff adapted services, providing care remotely, and worked in other NHS sectors. The impact on services and staff must be understood in order to safeguard patient care and foster workforce resilience. AIMS: To evaluate the experiences of clinical and non-clinical lymphoedema staff in Wales during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An anonymous online survey, based on scoping work, was sent out via the Welsh lymphoedema services mailing list. FINDINGS: 71% (68/96) of eligible lymphoedema staff completed the survey. More than half supported lymphoedema services (40/68) with the remaining staff deployed elsewhere. Overall, staff and services felt prepared for new ways of working. Concerns about others and the future burden on services when life returned to normal were reported. Opportunities identified included education initiatives and virtual services. CONCLUSION: Lymphoedema services were well prepared to deliver virtually, enable effective care and share knowledge. Co-ordinated efforts to uphold patient advocacy will support virtual services to meet their needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lymphedema/nursing , Nursing Staff/psychology , State Medicine/organization & administration , Telemedicine , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires , Wales/epidemiology
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