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1.
Am J Nurs ; 122(1): 13, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1612688

ABSTRACT

The pandemic has brought new public awareness of nursing's role.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Nurse's Role/psychology , Nursing/trends , Humans , Nursing/methods
2.
AACN Adv Crit Care ; 32(3): 247-263, 2021 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1399442

ABSTRACT

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation is a modified form of cardiopulmonary bypass and a complex adult critical care therapy. No evidence appears to exist on sustaining relevant quality nursing standards during a pandemic. The aim for this quality improvement process was to address nursing provision in real time related to extracorporeal membrane oxygenation in a pandemic, providing fundamentals for future readiness. The Ishikawa fishbone diagram and a Plan-Do-Study-Act cycle were methods used. Process changes included implementation of a communication algorithm, an alternative nursing care model, increased nursing staffing and leadership visibility, use of perfusion services for nursing task support, and minimized nursing documentation. Changes applied were successful. We recommend increasing nursing staffing volume and support resources, applying a communication algorithm, and minimizing documentation requirements. These strategies are generalizable to other clinical nursing areas in similar pandemics or disasters.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Nursing/methods , Quality Improvement , Adult , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Nurs Adm Q ; 45(3): 197-200, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1261116

ABSTRACT

Nursing regulation is a specialty area of nursing practice that some may perceive as only performing licensing and disciplinary functions. However, highly effective boards strive to meet their mission of public protection through continuous innovation. This article describes several innovative programs initiated by a board of nursing. Among the examples include regulatory waivers during the pandemic, collaborations with stakeholder organizations, a resource for nursing peer-review committees, and an alternative remediation option for practice breakdown. With strong leadership and committed teams, regulation can both protect the public and play a part in actualizing the value of nursing.


Subject(s)
Nursing/methods , Social Control, Formal/methods , Social Values , Creativity , Humans , Nursing/instrumentation
5.
Ann Glob Health ; 87(1): 1, 2021 01 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1043783

ABSTRACT

Background: UC San Diego Health System (UCSDHS) is an academic medical center and integrated care network in the US-Mexico border area of California contiguous to the Mexican Northern Baja region. The COVID-19 pandemic deeply influenced UCSDHS activities as new public health challenges increasingly related to high population density, cross-border traffic, economic disparities, and interconnectedness between cross-border communities, which accelerated development of clinical collaborations between UCSDHS and several border community hospitals - one in the US, two in Mexico - as high volumes of severely ill patients overwhelmed hospitals. Objective: We describe the development, implementation, feasibility, and acceptance of a novel critical care support program in three community hospitals along the US-Mexico border. Methods: We created and instituted a hybrid critical care program involving: 1) in-person activities to perform needs assessments of equipment and supplies and hands-on training and education, and 2) creation of a telemedicine-based (Tele-ICU) service for direct patient management and/or consultative, education-based experiences. We collected performance metrics surrounding adherence to evidence-based practices and staff perceptions of critical care delivery. Findings: In-person intervention phase identified and filled gaps in equipment and supplies, and Tele-ICU program promoted adherence to evidence-based practices and improved staff confidence in caring for critically ill COVID-19 patients at each hospital. Conclusion: A collaborative, hybrid critical care program across academic and community centers is feasible and effective to address cross-cultural public health emergencies.


Subject(s)
Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Hospitals, Community , Interdisciplinary Communication , Telemedicine , Algorithms , COVID-19/prevention & control , California , Critical Care/organization & administration , Equipment and Supplies, Hospital , Evidence-Based Medicine , Health Personnel/education , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Intensive Care Units , International Cooperation , Mexico , Nursing/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Self Efficacy
6.
Nurs Sci Q ; 33(4): 297-298, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-791084

ABSTRACT

Living the art of nursing during the challenging times of a pandemic has profound implications for the discipline of nursing. Opportunities and limitations coexist with persons who shelter in place while others continue to practice amid personal risk in institutions where vital healthcare services are provided. This article illustrates potential lessons to be learned for future nurse practice and the ethos or straight-thinking implications for living quality during a global health crisis.


Subject(s)
Humanism , Nursing/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Humans , Nursing/trends
7.
Assist Inferm Ric ; 39(2): 66-108, 2020.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-679586

ABSTRACT

. The covid-19 emergency in the words of the nurses . This special issue of AIR is dedicated to the direct professional experiences and personal testimonies of a sample of the nursing personnel during the most dramatic phase of the covid-19 pandemia in the most severely affected regions of Northern Italy (Lombardy, Piedmont, Veneto, Friuli, Trentino, Emilia Romagna Regions). The decision to adopt a research strategy aimed to give visibility and voice to colleagues representing some of the key hospitals of the regions obliged to a radical reorganisation of their structures and organisation of care, was adopted to catch from inside the crisis scenarios the expected mix of intense emotions (from anxiety, to fatigue, to personal and professional uncertainty, to the burden of impotence), and of needed technical creativity and efficiency which were requested to face a totally unexpected situation where guidelines could hardly be of help. The interview/diaries/focus groups were carefully planned not so much in terms of the contents, but with attention to the acceptance of the interviewed to enter in a free dialogue, with no Q&A, to be recorded, and to last for the time felt to be by both sides appropriate. The texts which are reported in this dossier are fragments of the recordings (overall more then 30 hours), without adjustments. It has been agreed that while all the names of the participants are provided as 'authors', the individual contributions are anonymous (not out of privacy consideration!) as they are part of a collective narrative, which reflects the great variability of the languages and of the perceived-expressed experiences and memories. The material has been organised in sections which are conceived as 'verbal snapshots' taken from the networks of care settings, but at the same time of the places and houses where the colleagues were literally full-time living, to assure unaccountable overtime working hours, and the requested 'safety distances' and lockdowns. The titles of the 8 sections coincide somehow with the principal components of the chain of activities and challenges which had to be faced: The changes in everyday's care, How to be prepared to the emergency, The teamwork, The loneliness and the isolation of the patients, The loneliness of the nurses, The difficult choices, The organization of the work and of the wards, change after covid-19. The core of the dossier is framed by boxes which provide also a minimum background of the administrative and epidemiological data on the pandemia in the regions of interest (it is interesting to remind that the central-southern areas of Italy have been far less affected), and a brief concluding reflection on reflection on the post-pandemia from the nursing point of view.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Attitude to Health , Coronavirus Infections , Nurses/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Clinical Decision-Making , Emergencies , Hospital Administration , Humans , Italy , Loneliness , Nursing/methods , Nursing/organization & administration , Nursing, Team , Patient Isolation
8.
Br J Nurs ; 29(11): 653, 2020 Jun 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-591609

ABSTRACT

Sam Foster, Chief Nurse, Oxford University Hospitals, considers how different ways of working during the COVID-19 emergency have led nurses to reflect on and change the way they nurse.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/nursing , Nursing/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/nursing , COVID-19 , England/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , State Medicine
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