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1.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 10(9): 622, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2184804
2.
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care ; 25(2): 86-87, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2152248

Subject(s)
Nutritional Status , Humans
4.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 101(46): e31937, 2022 Nov 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135745

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic affected the physical and mental health, socioeconomic status, and community behavior of people worldwide. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the oral health and nutritional status of Japanese older adults based on the results of preoperative assessment in patients who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty under general anesthesia. This study included older adults (≧65 years) who underwent total hip or knee arthroplasty in whom orthopantomography was performed for preoperative oral health assessment, during January 2019 to December 2021. Gender, age, number of family members living together, number of teeth, body mass index, and serum total protein and serum albumin levels were collected for analysis of this study. A total of 201 patients aged 65 to 89 years participated in the study. While the COVID-19 pandemic has had no impact on the oral health status, there has been a drop in serum albumin level from the results of multivariable-adjusted regression analysis considering age, gender, number of family members, and time. The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the serum albumin level of Japanese orthopedic patients aged 65 years or older.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , COVID-19 , Humans , Aged , Nutritional Status , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Oral Health , Retrospective Studies , Japan/epidemiology , Serum Albumin/metabolism
5.
J Hum Nutr Diet ; 35(6): 1012-1015, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118946
6.
BMC Public Health ; 22(1): 2035, 2022 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2108756

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic drew hygiene to the center of disease prevention. The provision of adequate water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) services is crucial to protect public health during a pandemic. Yet, access to levels of water supply that support adequate hygiene measures are deficient in many areas in Nepal. We examined WASH practices and their impact on child health and nutritional status in two districts before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A longitudinal and mixed method study was conducted in March-May 2018 and November-December 2021. In total, 715 children aged 0-10 years were surveyed at baseline. Of these, 490 children were assessed at endline. Data collection methods included observations, a questionnaire, stool analysis, anthropometric measurements, water quality analysis, and an assessment of clinical signs of nutritional deficiencies. We conducted 10 in-depth interviews to understand major problems related to COVID-19. RESULTS: Most respondents (94.2%) had heard about COVID-19; however, they did not wear face masks or comply with any social distancing protocols. Almost 94.2% of the households self-reported handwashing with soap 5-10 times per day at endline, especially after defecation, compared to 19.6% at baseline. Water quality was better at endline than at baseline with median 12 to 29 CFU Escherichia coli/100 mL (interquartile range at baseline [IQR] = 4-101) at the point of collection and 34 to 51.5 CFU Escherichia coli/100 mL (IQR = 8-194) at the point of consumption. Fever (41.1-16.8%; p = 0.01), respiratory illness (14.3-4.3%; p = 0.002), diarrhea (19.6-9.5%; p = 0.01), and Giardia lamblia infections (34.2-6.5%, p = 0.01) decreased at endline. In contrast, nutritional deficiencies such as bitot's spots (26.7-40.2%; p = 0.01), pale conjunctiva (47.0-63.3%; p = 0.01), and dermatitis (64.8-81.4%; p = 0.01) increased at endline. The inadequacy of the harvest and the lack of household income to meet households' nutritional needs increased drastically (35.0-94.2%; p = 0.01). CONCLUSION: We found that improved water quality and handwashing practices were associated with a decrease in infectious diseases. However, food security also decreased resulting in a high prevalence of nutritional deficiencies. Our findings underline that disaster preparedness should consider access to adequate WASH, nutrition, and health supplies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Child , Humans , Sanitation , Nutritional Status , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Pandemics/prevention & control , Nepal/epidemiology , Hygiene , Water Supply , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Escherichia coli
7.
Ann Nutr Metab ; 78 Suppl 3: 1-63, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2098084

ABSTRACT

It is a plaesaure to announce the celebration of the XXXI Congress of the Spanish Nutrition Society that will be held in Cartagena (Murcia, Spain), from September 15th to 17th, 2022. As is already a tradition in our society, the day before, on September 14th, the IX Meeting of young researchers will take place, aimed at promoting interaction and knowledge exchange among young people working in the field of nutrition and food in Spain. In addition, young reserachers will receive a workshop about how to produce videos of research with high impact in the social media. The congress will offer a scientific and multidisciplinary journey through all aspects related to a personalized diet from children to adults, healthy, safe and sustainable. The connections between lifestyles and chronic non-communicable diseases and especially obesity, will be updated, as well as precision nutrition, incorporating the outstanding advances in nutrigenomics, epigenetics and metabolomic markers. New evidence of healthy effects of bioactive, prebiotic and probiotic components is also contemplated, without forgetting the issue of food allergies and intolerances, which are increasingly prevalent in our society. The circular economy and the new preferences for sustainable and local food pose challenges that will also be addressed at the congress and in the sessions for young researchers. In addition, the problem generated by the dissemination of nutritional information poorly contrasted in the media and social networks will be considered. We encourage you to schedule these dates in your 2022 agenda to attend and participate in our congress, whose program we have designed with great enthusiasm. We would also like to extend the invitation to participate to companies and institutions related to food, which will help us reflect that optimal food is only achieved with the involvement of EVERYONE. We hope that the proposal of this congress will be attractive to you and that we can share enriching experiences in Cartagena, Spain. The program of the congress is available in the URL https://www.xxxicongresosen2022.com/index.asp Yours sincerely, Elvira Larqué Daza, Organizer of the Spanish Nutrition Society (SEÑ) Congress 2022, Cartagena, Spain. Salvador Zamora Navarro, Honour member from the Spanish Nutrition Society (SEÑ). María Puy Portillo Baquedano, President of the Spanish Nutrition Society (SEÑ).


Subject(s)
Diet , Nutritional Status , Adolescent , Child , Humans , Life Style , Spain
8.
Int J Clin Pract ; 2022: 2448161, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2079081

ABSTRACT

Background: Patients with COVID-19 are susceptible to malnutrition, which is particularly concerning among critically ill patients. We evaluated the Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 (NRS-2002) score in such patients and determined its relationship with the hospitalization outcome. Methods: This cross-sectional study involved COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care units (ICUs) of Shahid Faghihi Hospital, Shiraz, Iran, between February and March 2021. We assessed the nutritional status using NRS-2002 and determined disease severity with the APACHE II index. Demographic information, weight, height, clinical signs, previous illness, medications, biochemical test results, and history of anorexia and weight loss were recorded. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 18. Results: The mean age of 100 patients was 55.36 ± 18.86 years. According to NRS-2002, 30%, 29%, and 41% of patients were at low risk, moderate risk, and high risk of malnutrition, respectively. Age and BUN increased significantly with NRS-2002, while albumin and hematocrit followed the opposite trend (P < 0.001). Patients who died had lower albumin and hematocrit levels but higher age, NRS-2002 scores, and BUN/creatinine levels than those who recovered. Multivariable logistic regression revealed that for every unit increase in the NRS-2002 score, the odds of mortality increased by 354% (OR: 4.54, CI: 1.48, 13.95, P=0.008). Conclusion: NRS-2002 is a valuable prognostic tool for critically ill COVID-19 patients, with each unit's rise in the score being associated with a 354% rise in the odds of mortality. Increased malnutrition risk was linked with higher age and BUN and lower albumin and hematocrit levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Humans , Aged, 80 and over , Nutritional Status , Nutrition Assessment , Critical Illness , Cross-Sectional Studies , Intensive Care Units , Albumins
9.
Nutrients ; 14(19)2022 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066302

ABSTRACT

SARS-CoV-2 infection (COVID-19) is associated with malnutrition risk in hospitalised individuals. COVID-19 and malnutrition studies in large European cohorts are limited, and post-discharge dietary characteristics are understudied. This study aimed to assess the rates of and risk factors for ≥10% weight loss in inpatients with COVID-19, and the need for post-discharge dietetic support and the General Practitioner (GP) prescription of oral nutritional supplements, during the first COVID-19 wave in a large teaching hospital in the UK. Hospitalised adult patients admitted between March and June 2020 with a confirmed COVID-19 diagnosis were included in this retrospective cohort study. Demographic, anthropometric, clinical, biochemical, and nutritional parameters associated with ≥10% weight loss and post-discharge characteristics were described. Logistic regression models were used to identify risk factors for ≥10% weight loss and post-discharge requirements for ongoing dietetic input and oral nutritional supplement prescription. From the total 288 patients analysed (40% females, 72 years median age), 19% lost ≥ 10% of their admission weight. The length of hospital stay was a significant risk factor for ≥10% weight loss in multivariable analysis (OR 1.22; 95% CI 1.08-1.38; p = 0.001). In addition, ≥10% weight loss was positively associated with higher admission weight and malnutrition screening scores, dysphagia, ICU admission, and artificial nutrition needs. The need for more than one dietetic input after discharge was associated with older age and ≥10% weight loss during admission. A large proportion of patients admitted to the hospital with COVID-19 experienced significant weight loss during admission. Longer hospital stay is a risk factor for ≥10% weight loss, independent of disease severity, reinforcing the importance of repeated malnutrition screening and timely referral to dietetics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Adult , Aftercare , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Hospitalization , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Male , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Malnutrition/etiology , Nutritional Status , Patient Discharge , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Loss
10.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065987

ABSTRACT

In view of persistent stunting and increasing rates of obesity coexisting among children in the era of the Integrated Nutrition Programme, a cross-sectional study was conducted to determined concurrent stunting and obesity (CSO) and related factors using a random sample of child-mother pairs (n = 400) in Mbombela, South Africa. Sociodemographic data was collected using a validated questionnaire, and stunting (≥2SD) and obesity (>3SD) were assessed through respective length-for-age (LAZ) and body mass index (BAZ) z-scores. Using SPSS 26.0, the mean age of children was 8 (4; 11) months, and poor sociodemographic status was observed, in terms of maternal singlehood (73%), no education or attaining primary education only (21%), being unemployed (79%), living in households with a monthly income below R10,000 (≈$617), and poor sanitation (84%). The z-test for a single proportion showed a significant difference between the prevalence of CSO (41%) and non-CSO (69%). Testing for the two hypotheses using the Chi-square test showed no significant difference of CSO between boys (40%) and girls (41%), while CSO was significantly different and high among children aged 6-11 months (55%), compared to those aged 0-5 months (35%) and ≥12 months (30%). Further analysis using hierarchical logistic regression showed significant associations of CSO with employment (AOR = 0.34; 95%CI: 0.14-0.78), maternal education status (AOR = 0.39; 95%CI: 0.14-1.09) and water access (AOR = 2.47; 95%CI: 1.32; 4.63). Evidence-based and multilevel intervention programs aiming to prevent CSO and addressing stunting, while improving weight status in children with social disadvantages, are necessary.


Subject(s)
Growth Disorders , Nutritional Status , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Growth Disorders/epidemiology , Growth Disorders/prevention & control , Humans , Infant , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , South Africa/epidemiology
11.
Pediatrics ; 150(5)2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065207

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Children in families facing energy insecurity have greater odds of poor health and developmental problems. In this study of families who requested and received medical certification for utility shut-off protection and were contacted by our Medical Legal Partnership (MLP), we aimed to assess concurrent health-related social needs related to utilities, housing, finances, and nutrition. METHODS: After medical certificates were completed at our academic pediatric center, our MLP office contacted families and assessed utility concerns as well as other health, social, and legal needs. In this observational study, we present descriptive analyses of patients who received certificates from September 2019 to May 2020 via data collected through the MLP survey during the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic (June 2020-December 2021). RESULTS: Of 167 families who received utility shut-off protection from September 2019 to May 2020, 84 (50.3%) parents and guardians were successfully contacted. Most (93%) found the medical certificate helpful. Additionally, 68% had applied for Energy Assistance, and 69% reported they were on utility company payment plans. Most (78%) owed arrearages, ranging from under $500 to over $20 000, for gas, electric, and/or water bills. Food, housing, and financial insecurity screening positivity rates were 65%, 85%, and 74%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Patients who were contacted by an MLP after receiving medical certification for utility shutoff protection were found to have challenges paying for utilities and faced multiple food, housing, and financial stressors. Through consultation and completion of medical forms for utility shutoff protection, pediatricians and MLPs can provide resources and advocacy to support families' physical, emotional, and psychosocial needs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Child , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Housing , Pediatricians , Nutritional Status , Certification
12.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275357, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065133

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Childhood undernutrition remains a public health issue that can lead to unfavourable effects in later life. These effects tend to be more devastating among urban poor young children, especially in light of the recent COVID-19 pandemic. There is an immediate need to introduce interventions to reduce childhood undernutrition. This paper described the study protocol of a nutrition programme that was developed based on the positive deviance approach and the evaluation of the effectiveness of the programme among urban poor children aged 3 to 5 years old. METHODS: This mixed-method study will be conducted in two phases at low-cost flats in Kuala Lumpur. Phase one will involve a focus group discussion with semi-structured interviews to explore maternal feeding practices and the types of food fed to the children. Phase two will involve a two-armed cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness of a programme developed based on the positive deviance approach. The programme will consist of educational lessons with peer-led cooking demonstrations, rehabilitation, and growth monitoring sessions. Intervention group will participate in the programme conducted by the researcher for three months whereas the comparison group will only receive all the education materials and menus used in the programme after data collection has been completed. For both groups, data including height, weight, and dietary intake of children as well as the nutritional knowledge and food security status of mothers will be collected at baseline, immediate post-intervention, and 3-month post-intervention. EXPECTED RESULTS: The positive deviance approach helps to recognise the common feeding practices and the local wisdom unique to the urban poor population. Through this programme, mothers may learn from and be empowered by their peers to adopt new feeding behaviours so that their children can achieve healthy weight gain. TRIAL REGISTRATION: This study was registered with clinicaltrials.gov: NCT04688515 on 29 December 2020, https://www.clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04688515.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Malaysia , Malnutrition/prevention & control , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic
13.
PLoS One ; 17(10): e0275345, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065132

ABSTRACT

Issues related to malnutrition, broadly defined, have received a growing attention in recent years, not only in connection with the Sustainable Development Goals but also recently with the unprecedented Covid-19 pandemic. At the same time, there exists a complex interaction between institutions, capital flows, and food and nutrition security that has received less attention in the relevant literature. In this paper we estimate a series of dynamic panel data models to examine the impact of institutional quality and capital flows on food security, nutrition security and undernourishment by using panel data for 25 SSA countries over the period 1996 to 2018. One of the key contributions of the paper is the use of both aggregate and disaggregated capital flows to examine the impact on both food and nutrition security, a dimension that has been surprisingly neglected in most of the relevant literature. We combine this with the interaction of various types of capital flows with an institutional quality index we constructed from various governance indicators to examine the impact of institutions on the overall nexus. Finally, we examine the impact not only on food and nutrition security but also on undernourishment. Our findings clearly demonstrate the importance of a heterogeneity approach and reflect on earlier work regarding the role of institutional quality in the overall nexus between external capital flows and various measures of food and nutrition security which leads, and as expected, to an interesting variation in the results obtained, depending on the type of capital flows and the interaction with the governance indicators.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , COVID-19/epidemiology , Food Supply/methods , Humans , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Pandemics
14.
Soc Sci Med ; 312: 115364, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061885

ABSTRACT

In addition to the direct health impacts of COVID-19, government and household mitigation measures have triggered negative indirect economic, educational, and food and health system impacts, hitting low-and middle-income countries the hardest and disproportionately affecting women and girls. We conducted a gender focused analysis on five critical and interwoven crises that have emerged because of the COVID-19 crisis and exacerbated malnutrition and food insecurity. These include restricted mobility and isolation; reduced income; food insecurity; reduced access to essential health and nutrition services; and school closures. Our approach included a theoretical gender analysis, targeted review of the literature, and a visual mapping of evidence-informed impact pathways. As data was identified to support the visualization of pathways, additions were made to codify the complex interrelations between the COVID-19 related crises and underlying gender relations. Our analysis and resultant evidence map illustrate how underlying inequitable norms such as gendered unprotected jobs, reduced access to economic resources, decreased decision-making power, and unequal gendered division of labor, were exacerbated by the pandemic's secondary containment efforts. Health and nutrition policies and interventions targeted to women and children fail to recognize and account for understanding and documentation of underlying gender norms, roles, and relations which may deter successful outcomes. Analyzing the indirect effects of COVID-19 on women and girls offers a useful illustration of how underlying gender inequities can exacerbate health and nutrition outcomes in a crisis. This evidence-informed approach can be used to identify and advocate for more comprehensive upstream policies and programs that address underlying gender inequities.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Income , Nutritional Status , Policy
16.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr ; 31(3): 355-361, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2056208

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Malnutrition is common in elderly patients and is an important geriatric syndrome that increases mortality. We aim to examine the frequency of malnutrition and independent risk factors associated with mortality in hospitalized elderly patients with COVID-19. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: Patients aged 65 years and older with COVID-19, who were hospitalized between 15th March and 30th April 2020, were included. Demographic characteristics of the patients, their comorbid diseases, medications, malnutrition, and mortality status were recorded. Nutritional Risk Screening-2002 was used as a malnutrition risk screening tool. The factors affecting mortality were analyzed using multivariate Binary Logistic regression analysis. RESULTS: Of the 451 patients included in the study, the mean age was 74.8±7.46 and 51.2% of them were female. The mean number of comorbid diseases was 1.9±1.28. Malnutrition risk was 64.7%, polymorbidity rate was 57.6% and polypharmacy was 19.3%. Mortality rate was found 18.4%. The risk factors affecting mortality were presented as malnutrition risk (OR: 3.26, p=0.013), high number of comorbid diseases (OR: 1.48, p=0.006), and high neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (OR: 1.18, p<0.001), C-reactive protein (OR: 1.01, p<0.001), and ferritin (OR: 1.01, p=0.041) in elderly patients with COVID-19. Malnutrition risk (3.3 times), multiple comorbid diseases (1.5 times), and high neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio (1.2 times) were independent risk factors that increased the mortality. CONCLUSIONS: The frequency of malnutrition risk and mortality in elderly patients with COVID-19 is high. The independent risk factors affecting mortality in these patients are the risk of malnutrition, multiple comorbid diseases, and a high neutrophil/lymphocyte ratio.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , C-Reactive Protein , Female , Ferritins , Geriatric Assessment/methods , Humans , Male , Malnutrition/complications , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Status , Risk Factors , Turkey/epidemiology
18.
Nutrients ; 14(18)2022 Sep 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043874

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The phenotype of patients affected by COVID-19 disease changed between the waves of the pandemic. We assessed the prevalence of oropharyngeal dysphagia (OD), malnutrition (MN), and mortality between the first three waves of COVID-19 patients in a general hospital. METHODS: a prospective observational study between April 2020-May 2021. Clinical assessment for OD was made with the volume-viscosity swallowing test; nutritional assessment was performed consistent with GLIM criteria. A multimodal intervention was implemented in the second and third wave, including (a) texturized diets-fork mashable (1900 kcal + 90 g protein) or pureed (1700 kcal + 75 g protein), (b) oral nutritional supplements (500-600 kcal + 25-30 g protein), and (c) fluid thickening (250 mPa·s or 800 mPa·s). RESULTS: We included 205 patients (69.3 ± 17.6 years) in the 1st, 200 (66.4 ± 17.5 years) in the 2nd, and 200 (72.0 ± 16.3 years;) in the 3rd wave (p = 0.004). On admission, prevalence of OD was 51.7%, 31.3% and 35.1%, and MN, 45.9%, 36.8% and 34.7%, respectively; mortality was 10.7%, 13.6% and 19.1%. OD was independently associated with age, delirium, and MN; MN, with age, OD, diarrhea and ICU admission; mortality, with age, OD and MN. (4) Conclusions: Prevalence of OD, MN and mortality was very high among COVID-19 patients. OD was independently associated with MN and mortality. An early and proactive multimodal nutritional intervention improved patients' nutritional status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Deglutition Disorders , Malnutrition , COVID-19/epidemiology , Deglutition Disorders/complications , Deglutition Disorders/epidemiology , Deglutition Disorders/therapy , Humans , Malnutrition/complications , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , Prevalence
19.
Rev Assoc Med Bras (1992) ; 68(8): 1096-1102, 2022 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039503

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: While studies on the treatment for the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic continue all over the world, factors that increase the risk of severe disease have also been the subject of research. Malnutrition has been considered an independent risk factor. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the clinical effect of dietary habits and evaluate the prognostic value of the Controlling Nutritional Status score in the COVID-19 patients we followed up. METHODS: A total of 2760 patients hospitalized for COVID-19 were examined. Patients were retrospectively screened from three different centers between September 1 and November 30, 2020. A total of 1488 (53.9%) patients who met the criteria were included in the study. Risk classifications were made according to the calculation methods of prognostic nutritional index and Controlling Nutritional Status scores and total scores. The primary outcome of the study was in-hospital mortality. RESULTS: The groups with severe Controlling Nutritional Status and prognostic nutritional index scores had a significantly higher mortality rate than those with mild scores. In the multivariable regression analysis performed to determine in-hospital mortality, the parameters, such as age (OR 1.04; 95%CI 1.02-1.06, p<0.001), admission oxygen saturation value (SaO2) (OR 0.85; 95%CI 0.83-0.87, p<0.001), and Controlling Nutritional Status score (OR 1.34; 95%CI 1.23-1.45, p<0.001), were independent predictors. The patient groups with a low Controlling Nutritional Status score had a higher rate of discharge with recovery (p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Higher Controlling Nutritional Status scores may be effective in determining in-hospital mortality in patients with COVID-19. Nutrition scores can be used as a useful and effective parameter to determine prognosis in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Humans , Malnutrition/etiology , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Status , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032971

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The COVID-19 pandemic impacted food systems, health systems and the environment globally, with potentially greater negative effects in many lower-middle income countries (LMICs) including Indonesia. The purpose of this qualitative study was to investigate the potential impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic on diets, health and the marine environment in Indonesia, based on the perspectives of a multidisciplinary group of informants. METHODS: We conducted remote in-depth interviews with 27 key informants from many regions of Indonesia, who are either healthcare providers, nutrition researchers or environmental researchers. Interview question guides were developed based on a socio-ecological framework. We analyzed the data using a qualitative content analysis approach. RESULTS: Informants suggested that while the COVID-19 brought increased awareness about and adherence to good nutrition and health behaviors, the impact was transitory. Informants indicated that healthy food options became less affordable, due to job losses and reduced income, suggesting a likely increase in food insecurity and obesity. Environmental researchers described higher levels of marine pollution from increase in hygienic wastes as well as from plastic packaging from food orders. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings reveal perceptions by informants that the increased awareness and adherence to health behaviors observed during the pandemic was not sustained. Our results also suggest that the pandemic may have exacerbated the double-burden paradox and marine pollution in Indonesia. This study offers information for generating hypotheses for quantitative studies to corroborate our findings and inform policies and programs to mitigate the long-term impacts of the COVID-19 on diets, health, and the marine environment in Indonesia.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Indonesia/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , Plastics
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