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1.
Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr (Engl Ed) ; 68(9): 621-627, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575090

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is characterized by various clinical manifestations, mainly respiratory involvement. Disease-related malnutrition is associated with impaired respiratory function and increased all-cause morbidity and mortality. Patients with COVID-19 infection carry a high nutritional risk. After designing a specific nutritional support protocol for this disease, we carried out a retrospective study on malnutrition and on the use of nutritional support in patients with COVID-19. METHODS: We performed a retrospective study to determine whether nutritional support positively affected hospital stay, clinical complications, and mortality in patients with COVID-19. We compared the results with those of standard nutritional management. Our secondary objectives were to determine the prevalence of malnutrition in patients with COVID-19 and the value of nutritional support in the hospital where the study was performed. RESULTS: At least 60% of patients with COVID-19 experience malnutrition (up to 78.66% presented at least 1 of the parameters studied). The specialized nutritional support protocol was indicated in only 21 patients (28%) and was started early in only 12 patients (16%). Hospital stay was significantly shorter in patients managed with the early protocol (5.09 days, 95% CI, 1.338-8.853, p<0.01). Similarly, in this group, respiratory distress was less severe and less frequent (41% vs 82.5%, p<0.007), and statistically significantly fewer complications were recorded (9/12 vs 91/63; p<0.001). CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 is associated with high rates of disease-related malnutrition. Early implementation of a specialized nutritional support plan can improve the prognosis of these patients by reducing hospital stay, the possibility of more severe respiratory distress, and complications in general.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Malnutrition , Nutritional Support , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Dyspnea/virology , Humans , Length of Stay , Malnutrition/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies
2.
Nutr Hosp ; 38(Spec No1): 41-45, 2021 Apr 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1503007

ABSTRACT

Introduction: The debate from the course preceding the SENPE (Spanish Society of Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism) 2020 Conference gathered together well-known professionals who form part of nutritional support teams (NSTs), as well as other specialists from departments whose patients benefit from the services offered by these NSTs. In this article, relevant points from the round table, including strengths and weaknesses detected in the implementation of nutrition support teams, are summarized.


El debate del curso previo al congreso de la Sociedad Española de Nutrición Clínica y Metabolismo (SENPE) 2020 reunió en una mesa redonda a profesionales de prestigio que forman parte de unidades de nutrición y dietética, y a otros especialistas de servicios cuyos pacientes se benefician de los servicios de estas unidades. En este artículo se muestran los puntos relevantes que se trataron en el mismo y se muestran algunas fortalezas y debilidades que se han detectado en la implementación de las unidades de nutrición.


Subject(s)
Food Service, Hospital , Health Personnel/organization & administration , Nutritional Support , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics
3.
Nutrients ; 13(8)2021 Aug 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1448912

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: While consent exists, that nutritional status has prognostic impact in the critically ill, the optimal feeding strategy has been a matter of debate. METHODS: Narrative review of the recent evidence and international guideline recommendations focusing on basic principles of nutrition in the ICU and the treatment of specific patient groups. Covered topics are: the importance and diagnosis of malnutrition in the ICU, the optimal timing and route of nutrition, energy and protein requirements, the supplementation of specific nutrients, as well as monitoring and complications of a Medical Nutrition Therapy (MNT). Furthermore, this review summarizes the available evidence to optimize the MNT of patients grouped by primarily affected organ system. RESULTS: Due to the considerable heterogeneity of the critically ill, MNT should be carefully adapted to the individual patient with special focus on phase of critical illness, metabolic tolerance, leading symptoms, and comorbidities. CONCLUSION: MNT in the ICU is complex and requiring an interdisciplinary approach and frequent reevaluation. The impact of personalized and disease-specific MNT on patient-centered clinical outcomes remains to be elucidated.


Subject(s)
Critical Care , Food, Formulated , Malnutrition/therapy , Nutritional Status , Nutritional Support , Energy Intake , Enteral Nutrition , Food, Formulated/adverse effects , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Malnutrition/diagnosis , Malnutrition/physiopathology , Nutritional Support/adverse effects , Nutritive Value , Parenteral Nutrition , Treatment Outcome
4.
Nutrients ; 13(9)2021 Aug 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1374476

ABSTRACT

The virus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) causes the disease coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). The cumulative number of cases reported globally is now nearly 197 million and the number of cumulative deaths is 4.2 million (26 July to 1 August 2021). Currently we are focusing primarily on keeping a safe distance from others, washing our hands, and wearing masks, and the question of the effects of diet and diet-dependent risk factors remains outside the center of attention. Nevertheless, numerous studies indicate that diet can play an important role in the course of COVID-19. In this paper, based on select scientific reports, we discuss the structure and replication cycle of SARS-CoV-2, risk factors, dietary standards for sick patients, and the roles of the microbiome and dietary components supporting the immune system in preventing COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diet therapy , Feeding Behavior , Gastrointestinal Microbiome/immunology , Nutritional Support/methods , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Micronutrients/administration & dosage , Probiotics/administration & dosage , Risk Factors , Severity of Illness Index , Virus Replication/immunology
5.
Int J Surg ; 93: 106079, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1373076

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate, in lung cancer patients awaiting elective surgery, the feasibility of delivering a novel four-week multimodal prehabilitation intervention and its effects on preoperative functional capacity and health-related quality of life (HRQoL), compared to standard hospital care. METHODS: Adult patients awaiting elective thoracotomy for lung cancer stages I, II or IIIa, were approached to participate in an open-label, randomized controlled trial of two parallel arms: multimodal prehabilitation combining a mixed-nutrient supplement with structured supervised and home-based exercise training, and relaxation-strategies (Prehab) or standard hospital care (Control). Feasibility was assessed based on recruitment and adherence rates to the intervention and study outcome assessment. Functional capacity, measured by the 6-min walk test (6MWT), and HRQoL were measured at baseline and after four weeks (preoperative). RESULTS: Within 5 months, 34 patients were enrolled and randomized (2:1) to Prehab (n = 24; median age = 67 years) or Control (n = 10; median age = 69 years); recruitment rate of 58.6%. The study was interrupted by the COVID-19 pandemic. Adherence to the prescribed intensity of the supervised exercise program was 84.1% (SD 23.1). Self-reported adherence to the home-based exercise program was 88.2% (SD 21) and to the nutritional supplement, 93.2% (SD 14.2). Adherence to patients' preoperative assessment was 82% and 88% in Prehab and Control, respectively. The mean adjusted difference in 4-week preoperative 6MWT between groups was 37.7 m (95% CI, -6.1 to 81.4), p = 0.089. There were no differences in HRQoL between groups. CONCLUSION: Within a preoperative timeframe, it was feasible to deliver this novel multimodal prehabilitation intervention in lung cancer patients awaiting surgery.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Neoplasms , Nutritional Support , Preoperative Care , Preoperative Exercise , Aged , Exercise Therapy , Feasibility Studies , Humans , Lung Neoplasms/surgery , Nutrients , Pandemics , Pilot Projects , Quality of Life , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome
7.
Curr Opin Clin Nutr Metab Care ; 24(5): 440-445, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337298

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: There has been a deluge of scientific data since coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) was first reported. The effects of COVID-19 on the digestive system are now increasingly well understood. This article aims to review the current data on the effects of COVID-19 on the digestive system with particular emphasis on preexisting digestive diseases and its implications on nutrition practices. RECENT FINDINGS: Evidence has shown that Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 virus affects the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, pancreas and hepatobiliary system resulting in different GI manifestations. Several preexisting digestive diseases have been investigated. These studies have revealed that these special patient population groups are generally not at an increased risk to contract COVID-19, but are susceptible to develop increasing severity of disease. Aside from medical therapy, optimizing nutritional care has a beneficial role in this group of patients. SUMMARY: GI manifestations of COVID-19 in addition to preexisting digestive diseases have an impact on patient's nutrition. Digestion, absorption and transport of nutrients may be impaired. To date, there are no existing guidelines on the nutritional management of patients for this particular at-risk group. Most nutrition practices are based only on observations and clinical experience. Basic prepandemic nutrition care principles are primarily followed but often individualized based on clinical judgment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/pathology , Digestive System Diseases/virology , Nutritional Support , Digestive System/virology , Digestive System Diseases/therapy , Humans , Nutritional Status , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 45: 381-388, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1322045

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has been a challenge for nutrition monitoring and delivery. This study evaluates clinical and nutritional characteristics of patients infected with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) and investigates the relationship between nutrition delivery and clinical outcomes. METHODS: Prospective observational study of adults admitted for >24 hrs to a tertiary-care hospital during a period of 2months. Data was collected on disease severity, energy, protein delivery and adequacy, use of mechanical ventilation (MV), hospital length of stay (LOS). Multivariate logistic regression models were used to determine the associations with mortality as the primary outcome. RESULTS: 1083 patients: 69% male (n = 747), 31% females (n = 336), mean age 58.2 ± 12.8 with 26.6 ± 4.32 BMI were analysed. 1021 patients survived and 62 deaths occurred, with 183 and 900 patients in the ICU and ward, respectively. Inadequate calorie and protein delivery had significantly higher mortality than those with adequate provision (p < 0.001) among the ICU patients. In bivariate logistic regression analysis, inadequacy of energy and protein, disease severity, comorbidities ≥3, NRS score ≥3 and prone ventilation correlates with mortality (p < 0.001). In multivariate logistic regression analysis of the ICU patients, energy inadequacy (OR:3.6, 95%CI:1.25-10.2) and prone ventilation (OR:11.0, 95%CI:3.8-31.9) were significantly (p < 0.05) associated with mortality after adjusting for disease severity, comorbidities and MV days. CONCLUSION: Most patients infected with SARS-CoV-2 are at nutrition risk that can impact outcome. Our data suggest that addressing nutritional adequacy can be one of the measures to reduce hospital LOS, and mortality among nutritionally risk patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritional Support , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Br J Nurs ; 30(13): S12-S18, 2021 Jul 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1311465

ABSTRACT

The need to offer nutritional support to children and young people is commonplace for health professionals. This article explores the use and indication of nasogastric tubes (NGT) in children and young people, before explaining the process of inserting NGTs and the ongoing management of this method of nutritional support.


Subject(s)
Enteral Nutrition , Intubation, Gastrointestinal , Nutritional Support , Adolescent , Child , Enteral Nutrition/nursing , Humans , Intubation, Gastrointestinal/nursing , Nutritional Support/methods , Nutritional Support/nursing
10.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 44: 173-187, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1283999

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has re-established the significance of analyzing the organism through a metabolic perspective to uncover the dynamic interconnections within the biological systems. The role of micronutrient status and metabolic health emerge as pivotal in COVID-19 pathogenesis and the immune system's response. Metabolic disruption, proceeding from modifiable factors, has been proposed as a significant risk factor accounting for infection susceptibility, disease severity and risk for post-COVID complications. Metabolomics, the comprehensive study and quantification of intermediates and products of metabolism, is a rapidly evolving field and a novel tool in biomarker discovery. In this article, we propose that leveraging insulin resistance biomarkers along with biomarkers of micronutrient deficiencies, will allow for a diagnostic window and provide functional therapeutic targets. Specifically, metabolomics can be applied as: a. At-home test to assess the risk of infection and propose nutritional support, b. A screening tool for high-risk COVID-19 patients to develop serious illness during hospital admission and prioritize medical support, c(i). A tool to match nutritional support with specific nutrient requirements for mildly ill patients to reduce the risk for hospitalization, and c(ii). for critically ill patients to reduce recovery time and risk of post-COVID complications, d. At-home test to monitor metabolic health and reduce post-COVID symptomatology. Metabolic rewiring offers potential virtues towards disease prevention, dissection of high-risk patients, taking actionable therapeutic measures, as well as shielding against post-COVID syndrome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Malnutrition/complications , Malnutrition/therapy , Micronutrients , Nutritional Status , Nutritional Support/methods , Humans , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
11.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(24): e26370, 2021 Jun 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269624

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an epidemic infectious disease resulted from 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV). Up till now, COVID-19 has swept globally. Currently, due to many high-profiled benefits, clinical studies on Toujie Quwen granule (TJQW) have been increasing. The aim of the study is to assess the efficacy and safety of TJQW used with conventional western therapy for COVID-19. METHODS: Relevant randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched in Chinese and English databases, and the search time is January 2020 to May 2021. English databases include PubMed, Embase, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library. Chinese databases include CNKI, WF, VIP, and CBM. The international clinical trial registration platform and the Chinese clinical trial registration platform of controlled trials will be searched by us from January 2020 to May 2021. According to the inclusion and exclusion criteria, screening literature, extraction data will be conducted by 2 researchers independently. Statistical analysis will be conducted using the RevMan 5.3.5 software. After screening the literature based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria, The Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system will be used to evaluate the quality of each result. RESULTS: This study will provide the evidence for TJQW to be used with conventional western therapy for COVID-19. CONCLUSION: The efficacy and safety of TJQW used with conventional western therapy for COVID-19 will be assessed. INPLASY REGISTRATION NUMBER: INPLASY202150038.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/therapeutic use , Meta-Analysis as Topic , Nutritional Support , Phytotherapy , Respiratory Therapy , Systematic Reviews as Topic , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Combined Modality Therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 44: 38-49, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1260690

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nutritional status is an often-overlooked component in infectious disease severity. Hospitalized or critically ill patients are at higher risk of malnutrition, and rapid assessment and treatment of poor nutritional status can impact clinical outcomes. As it relates to the COVID-19 pandemic, an estimated 5% of these patients require admission to an ICU. Per clinical practice guidelines, nutrition therapy should be a core component of treatment regimens. On account of the urgent need for information relating to the nutritional support of these patients, clinical practice guidance was published based on current critical care guidelines. However, a growing body of literature is now available that may provide further direction for the nutritional status and support in COVID-19 patients. This review, intended for the health care community, provides a heretofore lacking in-depth discussion and summary of the current data on nutrition risk and assessment and clinical practice guidelines for medical nutrition therapy for hospitalized and critically ill patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/methods , Inpatients , Malnutrition/complications , Malnutrition/therapy , Nutritional Support/methods , Critical Illness , Hospitalization , Humans , Nutritional Status , Pandemics , Prevalence , Risk Assessment , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 44: 469-471, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1252603

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND & AIMS: Evidence suggests the existence of an association between the institution of nutritional therapy and clinical outcomes in patients with critical COVID-19. Thus, the aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of nutritional assistance on COVID-19 mortality in patients admitted to intensive care units (ICU). METHODS: This is a subset of the cohort "Influence of nutritional therapy on clinical prognosis in patients with COVID-19: a multicenter retrospective cohort study". Clinical and nutrition assistance information (type of assistance, evaluation of anthropometric status, and time of introduction of nutritional therapy) and presence of diabetes, hypertension and previous respiratory disease were collected from electronic medical records. To evaluate the association between the variables of interest and mortality, the hazard ratio was estimated. RESULTS: We evaluated 153 critically ill patients ≥18 years old, affected by COVID-19, with a rate of mortality of 77.8%. Among non survivors 58.8% were female, 52.9% aged <65 years, 66.4% had arterial hypertension, 46.2% diabetes mellitus and 81.5% had an early onset of nutritional support. Initiation of nutritional therapy after 48 h (HR: 2.57; 95% CI: 1.57-4.20) and the presence of obesity (HR: 1.55; 95% CI: 1.04-2.31) were associated with higher mortality, even after adjustment for potential confounders. CONCLUSIONS: Our data suggests that the provision of early nutritional therapy should be prioritized, with greater attention directed to obese patients, and the nutritional assistance can contribute favorably to the clinical evolution and prognosis of critically ill patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Critical Care/methods , Nutritional Support/mortality , Nutritional Support/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Brazil/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nutritional Support/methods , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(21): e26059, 2021 May 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1242122

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: : Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is an emerging and rapidly evolving disease, with no recommended effective anti-coronavirus treatments. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has been widely used to treat COVID-19 in China, and the most used one is Lianhuaqingwen (LH). This study aimed to assess the efficacy and safety of LH combined with usual treatment vs usual treatment alone in treating mild or moderate COVID-19 by a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). METHODS AND ANALYSIS: : We systematically searched the Medline (OVID), Embase, the Cochrane Library, and 4 Chinese databases from inception to July 2020 to include the RCTs that evaluated the efficacy and safety of LH in combination with usual treatment vs usual treatment for mild or moderate COVID-19. A meta-analysis was performed to calculate the risk ratio (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for binary outcomes and mean difference (MD) for continuous outcomes. RESULTS: : A total of 5 RCTs with 824 individuals with mild or moderate COVID 19 were included. Compared with the usual treatment alone, LH in combination with usual treatment significantly improved the overall clinical efficacy (RR = 2.39, 95% CI 1.61-3.55), increased the rate of recovery of chest computed tomographic manifestations (RR = 1.80, 95% CI 1.08-3.01), reduced the rate of conversion to severe cases (RR = 0.47, 95% CI 0.29-0.74), shorten the duration of fever (MD = -1.00, 95% CI -1.17 to -0.84). Moreover, LH in combination with usual treatment did not increase the occurrence of the adverse event compared to usual treatment alone. CONCLUSION: : Our meta-analysis of RCTs indicated that LH in combination with usual treatment may improve the clinical efficacy in patients with mild or moderate COVID-19 without increasing adverse events. However, given the limitations and poor quality of included trials in this study, further large-sample RCTs or high-quality real-world studies are needed to confirm our conclusions.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , COVID-19/therapy , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/administration & dosage , Oxygen/administration & dosage , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/virology , China , Combined Modality Therapy/adverse effects , Combined Modality Therapy/methods , Drugs, Chinese Herbal/adverse effects , Humans , Lung/diagnostic imaging , Nutritional Support , Oxygen/adverse effects , Randomized Controlled Trials as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Severity of Illness Index , Tomography, X-Ray Computed , Treatment Outcome
15.
J Nutr ; 151(7): 1854-1878, 2021 07 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1226546

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many nutrients have powerful immunomodulatory actions with the potential to alter susceptibility to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) infection, progression to symptoms, likelihood of severe disease, and survival. OBJECTIVE: The aim was to review the latest evidence on how malnutrition across all its forms (under- and overnutrition and micronutrient status) may influence both susceptibility to, and progression of, COVID-19. METHODS: We synthesized information on 13 nutrition-related components and their potential interactions with COVID-19: overweight, obesity, and diabetes; protein-energy malnutrition; anemia; vitamins A, C, D, and E; PUFAs; iron; selenium; zinc; antioxidants; and nutritional support. For each section we provide: 1) a landscape review of pertinent material; 2) a systematic search of the literature in PubMed and EMBASE databases, including a wide range of preprint servers; and 3) a screen of 6 clinical trial registries. All original research was considered, without restriction to study design, and included if it covered: 1) severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (CoV) 2 (SARS-CoV-2), Middle East respiratory syndrome CoV (MERS-CoV), or SARS-CoV viruses and 2) disease susceptibility or 3) disease progression, and 4) the nutritional component of interest. Searches took place between 16 May and 11 August 2020. RESULTS: Across the 13 searches, 2732 articles from PubMed and EMBASE, 4164 articles from the preprint servers, and 433 trials were returned. In the final narrative synthesis, we include 22 published articles, 38 preprint articles, and 79 trials. CONCLUSIONS: Currently there is limited evidence that high-dose supplements of micronutrients will either prevent severe disease or speed up recovery. However, results of clinical trials are eagerly awaited. Given the known impacts of all forms of malnutrition on the immune system, public health strategies to reduce micronutrient deficiencies and undernutrition remain of critical importance. Furthermore, there is strong evidence that prevention of obesity and type 2 diabetes will reduce the risk of serious COVID-19 outcomes. This review is registered at PROSPERO as CRD42020186194.


Subject(s)
Anemia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Obesity/epidemiology , Protein-Energy Malnutrition/epidemiology , Antioxidants/metabolism , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Comorbidity , Dietary Supplements , Disease Progression , Fatty Acids, Omega-3/immunology , Fatty Acids, Omega-6/immunology , Humans , Iron/immunology , Nutritional Support , SARS-CoV-2 , Selenium/immunology , Severity of Illness Index , Vitamins/immunology , Zinc/immunology
16.
Clin Nutr ; 40(3): 895-900, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1198670

ABSTRACT

There are reports of children COVID-19 or COVID-19 like symptoms with hyperinflammatory multisystem syndrome, ARDS, gastrointestinal and atypical Kawasaki disease presenting to PICU worldwide temporally associated with COVID-19, for which there are important nutrition support considerations. As a result, the European Society of Pediatric and Neonatal Intensive Care - Metabolism, Endocrine and Nutrition group (ESPNIC-MEN) and paediatric nutritionists working in PICUs are being consulted regarding nutrition management of critically ill children with COVID-19 or COVID-19 like symptoms. Therefore, the aim of this short report is to provide a summary of nutrition support recommendations for critically ill children with COVID-19. They are based on the ESPNIC-MEN section recommendations published in January 2020 and surviving sepsis recommendations from February 2020.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nutritional Support/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Systemic Inflammatory Response Syndrome/therapy , Child , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Enteral Nutrition/methods , Humans , Intensive Care Units, Pediatric , Nutritional Status
17.
Asia Pac J Clin Nutr ; 30(1): 15-21, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1160056

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) epidemic is spreading all over the world. With the number of cases increasing rapidly, the epidemiological data on the nutritional practice is scarce. In this study, we aim to describe the clinical characteristics and nutritional practice in a cohort of critically ill COVID-19 patients. METHODS AND STUDY DESIGN: This is a multicenter, ambidirectional cohort study conducted at 11 hospitals in Hubei Province, China. All eligible critical COVID-19 patients in the study hospital intensive care units at 00:00, March 6th, 2020, were included. Data collection was performed via written case report forms. RESULTS: A total of 44 patients were identified and enrolled, of whom eight died during the 28-day outcome follow- up period. The median interval between hospital admission and the study day was 24 (interquartile range, 13- 26) days and 52.2% (23 of 44) of patients were on invasive mechanical ventilation. The median nutrition risk in critically ill (mNUTRIC) score was 3 (interquartile range, 2-5) on the study day. During the enrolment day, 68.2% (30 of 44) of patients received enteral nutrition (EN), while 6.8% (3 of 44) received parenteral nutrition (PN) alone. Nausea and aspiration were uncommon, with a prevalence of 11.4% (5 of 44) and 6.8% (3 of 44), respectively. As for energy delivery, 69.7% (23 of 33) of patients receiving EN and/or PN were achieving their prescribed targets. CONCLUSIONS: The study showed that EN was frequently applied in critical COVID-19 patients. Energy delivery may be suboptimal in this study requiring more attention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Illness/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Nutritional Support , Aged , China/epidemiology , Cohort Studies , Enteral Nutrition/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Male , Middle Aged , Parenteral Nutrition/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(4): 205-206, 2020 Apr.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156093

ABSTRACT

In this pandemic global emergency, self-care and psycho-physical wellbeing's programs for healthcare workers are an absolute priority. Now more than ever, physicians and nurses are facing abnormal burdens of work, stressful clinical and organizational conditions and emotional charges that are challenging their ability to cope and jeopardizing their own lives. By improving nutritional education in medical faculties, implementing healthy lifestyles promotion and burnout prevention projects in the hospitals, we will be able to maintain a good quality of care throughout these trying times and hopefully we will improve the selfcare strategies for health professionals for the next future.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Medical Staff/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Self Care , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotional Adjustment , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Life Style , Nutritional Support , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Workload
19.
Nutr Clin Pract ; 36(2): 268-274, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1151955

ABSTRACT

Clinicians have widely recognized that indirect calorimetry (IC) is the "gold standard" for measuring energy expenditure (EE) and thus would intuitively anticipate that its use would be needed to provide optimal nutrition support in critical illness. Recent studies in the literature as well as dramatic changes in clinical practice over the past decade, though, would suggest that such a precise measure by IC to set energy goals is not required to maximize clinical benefit from early feeding in the intensive care unit (ICU). Results from randomized controlled trials evaluating permissive underfeeding, use of supplemental parenteral nutrition to achieve tight calorie control, and caloric density of formulas to increase energy delivery have provided an important perspective on 3 pertinent issues. First, a simple weight-based predictive equation (25 kcal/kg/day) provides a clinically useful approximation of EE. Second, a precise measure of EE by IC does not appear to improve outcomes compared with use of this less accurate estimation of energy requirements. And third, providing some percentage of requirements (50%-80%), achieves similar clinical benefit to full feeding (100%) in the early phases of critical illness. The value from IC use lies in the determination of caloric requirements in conditions for which weight-based equations are rendered inaccurate (anasarca, amputation, severe obesity) or the clinical state is markedly altered (such as the prolonged hyperinflammatory state of coronavirus disease 2019 [COVID-19]). In most other circumstances, routine use of IC would not be expected to change clinical outcomes from early nutrition therapy in the ICU.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Decision Rules , Nutrition Assessment , Nutritional Support/methods , Body Weight , Calorimetry, Indirect , Critical Illness/therapy , Energy Metabolism , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Nutritional Requirements , Nutritional Status , SARS-CoV-2
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