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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261707, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1623660

ABSTRACT

The objective of this retrospective cohort study was to describe pre-treatment characteristics, treatment patterns, health resource use, and clinical outcomes among adults hospitalized with COVID-19 in the United States (US) who initiated common treatments for COVID-19. The Optum® COVID-19 electronic health records database was used to identify patients >18 years, diagnosed with COVID-19, who were admitted to an inpatient setting and received treatments of interest for COVID-19 between September 2020 and January 2021. Patients were stratified into cohorts based on index treatment use. Patient demographics, medical history, care setting, medical procedures, subsequent treatment use, patient disposition, clinical improvement, and outcomes were summarized descriptively. Among a total of 26,192 patients identified, the most prevalent treatments initiated were dexamethasone (35.4%) and dexamethasone + remdesivir (14.9%), and dexamethasone was the most common subsequent treatment. At day 14 post-index, <10% of patients received any treatments of interest. Mean (standard deviation [SD]) patient age was 65.6 (15.6) years, and the most prevalent comorbidities included hypertension (44.8%), obesity (35.4%), and diabetes (25.7%). At the end of follow-up, patients had a mean (SD) 8.1 (6.6) inpatient days and 1.4 (4.1) days with ICU care. Oxygen supplementation, non-invasive, or invasive ventilation was required by 4.5%, 3.0%, and 3.1% of patients, respectively. At the end of follow-up, 84.2% of patients had evidence of clinical improvement, 3.1% remained hospitalized, 83.8% were discharged, 4% died in hospital, and 9.1% died after discharge. Although the majority of patients were discharged alive, no treatments appeared to alleviate the inpatient morbidity and mortality associated with COVID-19. This highlights an unmet need for effective treatment options for patients hospitalized with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Adenosine Monophosphate/analogs & derivatives , Alanine/analogs & derivatives , Anti-Inflammatory Agents/therapeutic use , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , Dexamethasone/therapeutic use , Hypertension/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Patient Discharge , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adenosine Monophosphate/therapeutic use , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Alanine/therapeutic use , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Comorbidity , Drug Therapy, Combination/methods , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , RNA, Viral/genetics , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , United States/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1622641

ABSTRACT

Currently, the world is facing two serious pandemics: obesity and COVID-19. It is well-established that the prevalence of obesity has risen dramatically, causing a deterioration in the health quality of the population and increasing susceptibility for the unfavourable course of acute infections. It has been observed that excess body mass significantly influences the COVID-19 outcome. The aim of this review is to present the latest scientific reports on the impact of excess body mass on the course and complications of COVID-19. The Web of Science, PubMed, and Google Scholar databases were searched. Only studies reporting patients stated to be COVID-19 positive based on the results of a nasopharyngeal swab and the ribonucleic acid test were included. It is shown that thromboembolic and ischemic complications, namely stroke, disseminated intravascular coagulation, severe hyperglycaemia, and leukoencephalopathy are more likely to appear in COVID-19 positive patients with obesity compared to non-obese subjects. COVID-19 complications such as cardiomyopathy, dysrhythmias, endothelial dysfunction, acute kidney injury, dyslipidaemia, lung lesions and acute respiratory distress syndrome have a worse outcome among obese patients.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , Obesity/complications , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/physiopathology , Cardiomyopathies , Cardiovascular Diseases/complications , Databases, Factual , Humans , Hyperglycemia , Kidney , Metabolic Syndrome , Obesity/physiopathology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index
3.
BMC Endocr Disord ; 22(1): 13, 2022 Jan 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613234

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Research regarding the association between severe obesity and in-hospital mortality is inconsistent. We evaluated the impact of body mass index (BMI) levels on mortality in the medical wards. The analysis was performed separately before and during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We retrospectively retrieved data of adult patients admitted to the medical wards at the Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. The study was conducted between January 1, 2011, to March 23, 2021. Patients were divided into two sub-cohorts: pre-COVID-19 and during-COVID-19. Patients were then clustered into groups based on BMI ranges. A multivariate logistic regression analysis compared the mortality rate among the BMI groups, before and during the pandemic. RESULTS: Overall, 179,288 patients were admitted to the medical wards and had a recorded BMI measurement. 149,098 were admitted before the COVID-19 pandemic and 30,190 during the pandemic. Pre-pandemic, multivariate analysis showed a "J curve" between BMI and mortality. Severe obesity (BMI > 40) had an aOR of 0.8 (95% CI:0.7-1.0, p = 0.018) compared to the normal BMI group. In contrast, during the pandemic, the analysis showed a "U curve" between BMI and mortality. Severe obesity had an aOR of 1.7 (95% CI:1.3-2.4, p < 0.001) compared to the normal BMI group. CONCLUSIONS: Medical ward patients with severe obesity have a lower risk for mortality compared to patients with normal BMI. However, this does not apply during COVID-19, where obesity was a leading risk factor for mortality in the medical wards. It is important for the internal medicine physician to understand the intricacies of the association between obesity and medical ward mortality.


Subject(s)
Body Mass Index , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Obesity/physiopathology , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/pathology , COVID-19/virology , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Prognosis , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Survival Rate
4.
J Extra Corpor Technol ; 53(4): 293-298, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613221

ABSTRACT

Extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in the management of severely ill patients with COVID-19 has been reported in more than 5,827 cases worldwide according to the Extracorporeal Life Support Organization (ELSO). Several pre-existing conditions have been linked to an increase in COVID-19 mortality risk including obesity. The purpose of this research is to review the clinical experience from a cohort of 342 COVID-19 patients treated with ECMO in which 61.7% (211/342) are confirmed obese. Following institutional review board approval, we reviewed all 342 COVID-19 patients supported with ECMO between March 17, 2020 and March 18, 2021, at 40 American institutions from a multi-institutional database. Descriptive statistics comparing survivors to non-survivors were calculated using chi-square, Welch's ANOVA, and Kruskal-Wallis rank sum test as appropriate. Multivariable logistic regression was used to estimate the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the odds of survival while adjusting for age, gender, chronic renal failure, diabetes, asthma, hypertension, and pre-ECMO P/F ratio. Descriptive analysis showed that obese patients were more likely to be hypertensive (58.1% vs. 32%, p < .001), diabetic (42% vs. 30%, p < .05), and female (35% vs. 21%, p < .05), and had longer median days from intubation to cannulation (4.0 vs. 2.0, p < .05). Obese patients appeared to also have a slightly lower median age (47.9 vs. 50.5, p = .07), higher incidence of asthma (17.8% vs. 10.2%, p = .09), and a slightly lower pre-ECMO PaO2/FiO2 ratio (67.5 vs. 77.5, p = .08) though these differences were slightly less statistically reliable. Results from the logistic regression model suggest no statistically reliable association between BMI and odds of survival. Age had a moderately large and statistically reliable negative association with survival; the relative odds of survival for a 59-year-old patient were approximately half those of a 41-year-old patient (OR = .53, 95% CI: .36-.77, p < .001). Obesity does not seem to be a major risk factor for poor outcomes in COVID-19 patients supported with ECMO; however, age was moderately negatively associated with survival. The potential influence of other comorbidities on odds of survival among these patients warrant further investigation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Adult , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
5.
BMJ Open ; 12(1): e055490, 2022 01 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613008

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Obesity prevention is increasingly focused on early childhood, but toddlers have not been well-studied, and children born preterm are frequently excluded. The Play & Grow Cohort was established to investigate child growth in relation to parent-child interactions in mealtime and non-mealtime settings. PARTICIPANTS: Between December 2017 and May 2019, 300 toddlers and primary caregivers were recruited from records of a large paediatric care provider in Columbus, Ohio, USA. This report describes recruitment of the cohort and outlines the data collection protocols for two toddler and two preschool-age visits. The first study visit coincided with enrolment and occurred when children (57% boys) were a mean (SD) calendar age of 18.2 (0.7) months. FINDINGS TO DATE: Children in the cohort are diverse relative to gestational age at birth (16%, 28-31 completed weeks' gestation; 21%, 32-36 weeks' gestation; 63%, ≥37 weeks' gestation) and race/ethnicity (8%, Hispanic; 35%, non-Hispanic black; 46%, non-Hispanic white). Caregivers enrolled in the cohort are primarily the child's biological mother (93%) and are diverse in age (range 18-54 years), education (23%, high school or less; 20% graduate degree) and annual household income (27%,

Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity , Ohio , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
8.
Front Endocrinol (Lausanne) ; 12: 747732, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1598924

ABSTRACT

Objective: To evaluate the association between overweight and obesity on the clinical course and outcomes in patients hospitalized with COVID-19. Design: Retrospective, observational cohort study. Methods: We performed a multicenter, retrospective, observational cohort study of hospitalized COVID-19 patients to evaluate the associations between overweight and obesity on the clinical course and outcomes. Results: Out of 1634 hospitalized COVID-19 patients, 473 (28.9%) had normal weight, 669 (40.9%) were overweight, and 492 (30.1%) were obese. Patients who were overweight or had obesity were younger, and there were more women in the obese group. Normal-weight patients more often had pre-existing conditions such as malignancy, or were organ recipients. During admission, patients who were overweight or had obesity had an increased probability of acute respiratory distress syndrome [OR 1.70 (1.26-2.30) and 1.40 (1.01-1.96)], respectively and acute kidney failure [OR 2.29 (1.28-3.76) and 1.92 (1.06-3.48)], respectively. Length of hospital stay was similar between groups. The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 27.7%, and multivariate logistic regression analyses showed that overweight and obesity were not associated with increased mortality compared to normal-weight patients. Conclusion: In this study, overweight and obesity were associated with acute respiratory distress syndrome and acute kidney injury, but not with in-hospital mortality nor length of hospital stay.


Subject(s)
Acute Kidney Injury/complications , COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Hospitalization , Obesity/complications , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/complications , Aged , Female , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Patient Discharge , Respiration, Artificial , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
9.
Biomolecules ; 11(12)2021 12 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1593561

ABSTRACT

Obesity is a health problem with increasing impacts on public health, economy and even social life. In order to reestablish the energy balance, obesity management focuses mainly on two pillars; exercise and diet. Beyond the contribution to the caloric intake, the diet nutrients and composition govern a variety of properties. This includes the energy balance-independent properties and the indirect metabolic effects. Whereas the energy balance-independent properties are close to "pharmacological" effects and include effects such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory, the indirect metabolic effects represent the contribution a diet can have on energy metabolism beyond the caloric contribution itself, which include the food intake control and metabolic changes. As an illustration, we also described the metabolic implication and hypothetical pathways of the high-fat diet-induced gene Trefoil Factor Family 2. The properties the diet has can have a variety of applications mainly in pharmacology and nutrition and further explore the "pharmacologically" active food towards potential therapeutic applications.


Subject(s)
Caloric Restriction/methods , Obesity/diet therapy , Trefoil Factor-2/metabolism , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Energy Metabolism/drug effects , Humans , Obesity/metabolism , Up-Regulation/drug effects
10.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 9(11): 786-798, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1586178

ABSTRACT

Up to 50% of the people who have died from COVID-19 had metabolic and vascular disorders. Notably, there are many direct links between COVID-19 and the metabolic and endocrine systems. Thus, not only are patients with metabolic dysfunction (eg, obesity, hypertension, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and diabetes) at an increased risk of developing severe COVID-19 but also infection with SARS-CoV-2 might lead to new-onset diabetes or aggravation of pre-existing metabolic disorders. In this Review, we provide an update on the mechanisms of how metabolic and endocrine disorders might predispose patients to develop severe COVID-19. Additionally, we update the practical recommendations and management of patients with COVID-19 and post-pandemic. Furthermore, we summarise new treatment options for patients with both COVID-19 and diabetes, and highlight current challenges in clinical management.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/metabolism , Disease Management , Metabolic Diseases/epidemiology , Metabolic Diseases/metabolism , Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/metabolism , COVID-19/therapy , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/metabolism , Diabetes Mellitus/therapy , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/metabolism , Hypertension/therapy , Metabolic Diseases/therapy , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/metabolism , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/therapy , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/metabolism , Obesity/therapy
11.
Int J Mol Sci ; 23(1)2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1580701

ABSTRACT

Using drugs to treat COVID-19 symptoms may induce adverse effects and modify patient outcomes. These adverse events may be further aggravated in obese patients, who often present different illnesses such as metabolic-associated fatty liver disease. In Rennes University Hospital, several drug such as hydroxychloroquine (HCQ) have been used in the clinical trial HARMONICOV to treat COVID-19 patients, including obese patients. The aim of this study is to determine whether HCQ metabolism and hepatotoxicity are worsened in obese patients using an in vivo/in vitro approach. Liquid chromatography high resolution mass spectrometry in combination with untargeted screening and molecular networking were employed to study drug metabolism in vivo (patient's plasma) and in vitro (HepaRG cells and RPTEC cells). In addition, HepaRG cells model were used to reproduce pathophysiological features of obese patient metabolism, i.e., in the condition of hepatic steatosis. The metabolic signature of HCQ was modified in HepaRG cells cultured under a steatosis condition and a new metabolite was detected (carboxychloroquine). The RPTEC model was found to produce only one metabolite. A higher cytotoxicity of HCQ was observed in HepaRG cells exposed to exogenous fatty acids, while neutral lipid accumulation (steatosis) was further enhanced in these cells. These in vitro data were compared with the biological parameters of 17 COVID-19 patients treated with HCQ included in the HARMONICOV cohort. Overall, our data suggest that steatosis may be a risk factor for altered drug metabolism and possibly toxicity of HCQ.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Antiviral Agents/metabolism , COVID-19/drug therapy , Hydroxychloroquine/adverse effects , Hydroxychloroquine/metabolism , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/metabolism , Cell Line , Cell Survival/drug effects , Chemical and Drug Induced Liver Injury/metabolism , Correlation of Data , Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions , Fatty Acids/pharmacology , Fatty Liver/complications , Fatty Liver/metabolism , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Linear Models , Male , Metabolic Networks and Pathways , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/metabolism , Risk Factors
12.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 155 Suppl 1: 123-134, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1575902

ABSTRACT

Despite the evidence supporting the relevance of obesity and obesity-associated disorders in the development, management, and prognosis of various cancers, obesity rates continue to increase worldwide. Growing evidence supports the involvement of obesity in the development of gynecologic malignancies. This article explores the molecular basis governing the alteration of hallmarks of cancer in the development of obesity-related gynecologic malignancies encompassing cervical, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. We highlight specific examples of how development, management, and prognosis are affected for each cancer, incorporate current knowledge on complementary approaches including lifestyle interventions to improve patient outcomes, and highlight how new technologies are helping us better understand the biology underlying this neglected pandemic.


Subject(s)
Endometrial Neoplasms , Genital Neoplasms, Female , Ovarian Neoplasms , Uterine Cervical Neoplasms , Female , Genital Neoplasms, Female/epidemiology , Humans , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Ovarian Neoplasms/epidemiology , Ovarian Neoplasms/etiology
13.
Viruses ; 13(12)2021 12 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572667

ABSTRACT

Pre-existing comorbidities such as obesity or metabolic diseases can adversely affect the clinical outcome of COVID-19. Chronic metabolic disorders are globally on the rise and often a consequence of an unhealthy diet, referred to as a Western Diet. For the first time in the Syrian hamster model, we demonstrate the detrimental impact of a continuous high-fat high-sugar diet on COVID-19 outcome. We observed increased weight loss and lung pathology, such as exudate, vasculitis, hemorrhage, fibrin, and edema, delayed viral clearance and functional lung recovery, and prolonged viral shedding. This was accompanied by an altered, but not significantly different, systemic IL-10 and IL-6 profile, as well as a dysregulated serum lipid response dominated by polyunsaturated fatty acid-containing phosphatidylethanolamine, partially recapitulating cytokine and lipid responses associated with severe human COVID-19. Our data support the hamster model for testing restrictive or targeted diets and immunomodulatory therapies to mediate the adverse effects of metabolic disease on COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diet, High-Fat/adverse effects , Dietary Carbohydrates/adverse effects , Lipid Metabolism , Severity of Illness Index , Animals , COVID-19/pathology , Cricetinae , Cytokines/blood , Disease Models, Animal , Edema , Fibrin , Hemorrhage , Humans , Interleukin-10 , Interleukin-6 , Lipidomics , Lipids/blood , Liver/pathology , Lung/pathology , Male , Mesocricetus , Obesity , SARS-CoV-2 , Sugars , Vasculitis/pathology , Virus Shedding
14.
Physiol Rev ; 102(1): 1-6, 2022 01 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1554572
15.
J Med Virol ; 93(12): 6660-6670, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1544317

ABSTRACT

With the wide spread of Coronavirus, most people who infected with the COVID-19, will recover without requiring special treatment. Whereas, elders and those with underlying medical problems are more likely to have serious illnesses, even be threatened with death. Many more disciplines try to find solutions and drive master plan to this global trouble. Consequently, by taking one particular population, Hungary, this study aims to explore a pattern of COVID-19 victims, who suffered from some underlying conditions. Age, gender, and underlying medical problems form the structure of the clustering. K-Means and two step clustering methods were applied for age-based and age-independent analysis. Grouping of the deaths in the form of two different scenarios may highlight some concepts of this deadly disease for public health professionals. Our result for clustering can forecast similar cases which are assigned to any cluster that it will be a serious cautious for the population.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Asthma/complications , COVID-19/etiology , Diabetes Complications/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Hungary/epidemiology , Lung Diseases/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Neoplasms/complications , Obesity/complications , Risk Factors , Schizophrenia/complications , Sex Factors , Young Adult
17.
Rev. latinoam. enferm. (Online) ; 29: e3502, 2021. tab
Article in English | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1533470

ABSTRACT

Objective: to verify the quality of life and eating habits of patients with obesity during the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: cross-sectional study with 68 outpatients, candidates for bariatric surgery, at university hospital in the Southern Brazil. Data collection was carried out by telephone, with questions about the profile of the participants and social distancing; questionnaires on quality of life and eating habits were also used. The data analysis, the logistic regression model, Spearman correlation, Mann-Whitney U and Student t-tests were used for independent samples. Results: the general quality of life was 57.03 points and the eating habit with the highest score was cognitive restraint (61.11 points). Most patients (72.1%) were socially distancing themselves and 27.9% had not changed their routine. The chance of isolation was 3.16 times greater for patients who were married. There is a positive correlation between the domains of the Quality of Life questionnaire and cognitive restraint from the questionnaire about eating habits. Conclusion: we found that the participants tended to have a better quality of life as cognitive restraint increased.


Objetivo: evaluar la calidad de vida y la conducta alimentaria de los pacientes con obesidad durante la pandemia de COVID-19. Método: estudio transversal con 68 pacientes atendidos en un servicio ambulatorio de cirugía bariátrica de un hospital universitario del sur de Brasil. La recolección de datos se realizó por vía telefónica, con preguntas sobre el perfil de los participantes y el distanciamiento social; también se utilizaron cuestionarios sobre calidad de vida y conducta alimentaria. Para el análisis de los datos se utilizó el modelo de regresión logística, la correlación de Spearman, las pruebas de la U de Mann-Whitney y la t de Student para muestras independientes. Resultados: la calidad de vida general fue de 57,03 puntos y la conducta alimentaria con mayor puntuación fue la restricción cognitiva (61,11 puntos). La mayoría de los pacientes (72,1%) mantenía el distanciamiento social y el 27,9% no habían cambiado la rutina. La probabilidad de adherir al aislamiento fue 3,16 veces mayor para los pacientes casados. Existe una correlación positiva entre los dominios del cuestionario de calidad de vida y la restricción cognitiva de las preguntas sobre la conducta asociada a los hábitos alimentarios. Conclusión: se verificó que los participantes tendían a tener una mejor calidad de vida a medida que aumentaba la restricción cognitiva.


Objetivo: verificar a qualidade de vida e o comportamento alimentar de pacientes com obesidade durante a pandemia por COVID-19. Método: estudo transversal com 68 pacientes atendidos em ambulatório de cirurgia bariátrica em hospital universitário do sul do Brasil. A coleta de dados foi realizada por telefone, com perguntas sobre o perfil dos participantes e o distanciamento social; também foram utilizados questionários de qualidade de vida e de comportamento alimentar. Para a análise de dados, foram utilizados o modelo de regressão logística, a correlação de Spearman e os testes U de Mann-Whitney e t de Student, para amostras independentes. Resultados: a qualidade de vida geral foi de 57,03 pontos e o comportamento alimentar que apresentou maior pontuação foi a restrição cognitiva (61,11 pontos). Grande parte dos pacientes (72,1%) estava fazendo distanciamento social e 27,9% não haviam mudado a rotina. A chance de fazer isolamento foi 3,16 vezes maior para os pacientes que estavam casados. Existe uma correlação positiva entre os domínios do questionário de qualidade de vida e a restrição cognitiva das perguntas sobre o comportamento associado ao hábito alimentar. Conclusão: verificou-se que os participantes apresentaram tendência em ter uma melhor qualidade de vida conforme a restrição cognitiva aumentava.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Outpatients , Patient Care Planning , Patient Isolation , Quality of Life , Behavior , Feeding Behavior , Physical Distancing , COVID-19 , Nursing Assessment , Obesity
18.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(6): 887-888, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526988
19.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 45(12): 2617-2622, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526061

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The impact of obesity on outcomes in acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is not well understood and remains controversial. Recent studies suggest that obesity might be associated with higher morbidity and mortality in respiratory disease caused by SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19 disease). Our objective was to evaluate the association between obesity and hospital mortality in critical COVID-19 patients. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study in a tertiary academic center located in Montréal between March and August 2020. We included all consecutive adult patients admitted to the ICU for COVID-19-confirmed respiratory disease. Our main outcome was hospital mortality. We estimated the association between obesity, using the body mass index as a continuous variable, and hospital survival by fitting a multivariable Cox proportional hazards model. RESULTS: We included 94 patients. Median [q1, q3] body mass index (BMI) was 29 [26-32] kg/m2 and 37% of patients were obese (defined as BMI > 30 kg/m2). Hospital mortality for the entire cohort was 33%. BMI was significantly associated with hospital mortality (hazard ratio [HR] = 2.49 per 10 units BMI; 95% CI, from 1.69 to 3.70; p < 0.001) even after adjustment for sex, age and obesity-related comorbidities (adjusted HR = 3.50; 95% CI from 2.03 to 6.02; p < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Obesity was prevalent in hospitalized patients with critical illness secondary to COVID-19 disease and a higher BMI was associated with higher hospital mortality. Further studies are needed to validate this association and to better understand its underlying mechanisms.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Hospital Mortality , Obesity/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Body Mass Index , Comorbidity , Critical Illness , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Quebec , Retrospective Studies , Survival Analysis
20.
Blood Coagul Fibrinolysis ; 32(8): 544-549, 2021 Dec 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1526211

ABSTRACT

Standard biomarkers have been widely used for COVID-19 diagnosis and prognosis. We hypothesize that thrombogenicity metrics measured by thromboelastography will provide better diagnostic and prognostic utility versus standard biomarkers in COVID-19 positive patients. In this observational prospective study, we included 119 hospitalized COVID-19 positive patients and 15 COVID-19 negative patients. On admission, we measured standard biomarkers and thrombogenicity using a novel thromboelastography assay (TEG-6s). In-hospital all-cause death and thrombotic occurrences (thromboembolism, myocardial infarction and stroke) were recorded. Most COVID-19 patients were African--Americans (68%). COVID-19 patients versus COVID-19 negative patients had higher platelet-fibrin clot strength (P-FCS), fibrin clot strength (FCS) and functional fibrinogen level (FLEV) (P ≤ 0.003 for all). The presence of high TEG-6 s metrics better discriminated COVID-19 positive from negative patients. COVID-19 positive patients with sequential organ failure assessment (SOFA) score at least 3 had higher P-FCS, FCS and FLEV than patients with scores less than 3 (P ≤ 0.001 for all comparisons). By multivariate analysis, the in-hospital composite endpoint occurrence of death and thrombotic events was independently associated with SOFA score more than 3 [odds ratio (OR) = 2.9, P = 0.03], diabetes (OR = 3.3, P = 0.02) and FCS > 40 mm (OR = 3.4, P = 0.02). This largest observational study suggested the early diagnostic and prognostic utility of thromboelastography to identify COVID-19 and should be considered hypothesis generating. Our results also support the recent FDA guidance regarding the importance of measurement of whole blood viscoelastic properties in COVID-19 patients. Our findings are consistent with the observation of higher hospitalization rates and poorer outcomes for African--Americans with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/blood , SARS-CoV-2 , Thrombophilia/diagnosis , Adult , African Americans/statistics & numerical data , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Early Diagnosis , Female , Fibrin/analysis , Fibrin Clot Lysis Time , Fibrinogen/analysis , Hospitalization , Humans , Hyperlipidemias/epidemiology , L-Lactate Dehydrogenase/blood , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/epidemiology , Organ Dysfunction Scores , Prognosis , Prospective Studies , Thrombelastography , Thrombophilia/blood , Thrombophilia/drug therapy , Thrombophilia/etiology , Treatment Outcome , /statistics & numerical data
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