Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 2.696
Filter
1.
Obes Res Clin Pract ; 16(2): 177-179, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35397992

ABSTRACT

Morbid obesity (MO) is a national health problem. We sought to study the prevalence and contemporary trends of MO in hospitalized young adults. Nationwide Readmission Database (NRD) for the years 2016-2019 was queried for young adult MO admissions (aged 18-35 years). A total of 750,972 (7.1%) MO admissions were analyzed. There was a trend of increasing MO admissions from 6.5% in 2016 to 7.7% in 2019 (Ptrend <0.001). MO was independently associated with an increase in mean costs by 270 million dollars per year of analysis. Authors suggest developing national programs targeting MO in young adults.


Subject(s)
Obesity, Morbid , Databases, Factual , Hospitalization , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
2.
Endocrinol Diabetes Nutr (Engl Ed) ; 69(3): 178-188, 2022 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35396116

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is highly prevalent in morbid obesity (MO). A considerable proportion of patients with MO have non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Liver biopsy (LB) is the only procedure that reliably differentiates NASH from other stages of NAFLD, but its invasive nature prevents it from being generalisable. Hence, non-invasive assessment is critical in this group of patients. OBJECTIVES: To report NAFLD/NASH prevalence in a cohort of patients with MO and to identify predictors of NASH. METHODS: Fifty-two consecutive patients subjected to bariatric surgery in a University hospital in Spain underwent LB. Anthropometric, clinical and biochemical variables were registered. According of the results of the LB, individuals were classified by whether they had NASH or not. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to identify independent factors associated with NASH. RESULTS: NAFLD was reported in 94.2% of the patients, simple steatosis was present in 51.92% and NASH in 42.31%. Meanwhile, 17.3% of patients exhibited significant fibrosis (≥F2). HIGHT score for NASH risk was established using five independent predictors: systemic Hypertension, Insulin resistance, Gamma-glutamyl transferase, High density lipoprotein cholesterol and alanine Transaminase. This score ranges from 0 to 7 and was used to predict NASH in our cohort (area under the receiver operator characteristic curve 0.846). A score of 4 or greater implied high risk (sensitivity 77.3%, specificity 73.3%, positive predictive value 68%, negative predictive value 81.5%, accuracy 75%). CONCLUSIONS: NAFLD is practically a constant in MO with a considerable proportion of patients presenting NASH. The combination of five independent predictors in a scoring system may help the clinician optimise the selection of patients with MO for LB.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease , Obesity, Morbid , Biopsy , Humans , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/complications , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/epidemiology , Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease/pathology , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Prevalence
3.
J Trauma Nurs ; 29(2): 80-85, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35275109

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Literature suggests that unhealthy body mass index is a risk factor for adverse clinical outcomes. OBJECTIVES: To study the association between unhealthy body mass index and morbidity and mortality after trauma using the 2016 American College of Surgeons Trauma Quality Improvement Program database. METHODS: A retrospective review was conducted comparing the normal weight control group to the underweight, overweight, obese, severely obese, and morbidly obese groups for differences in demographic factors, injury severity score, comorbidities, length of stay, and complications. RESULTS: Underweight, overweight, obese, severely obese, and morbidly obese body mass indexes, in comparison to normal weight body mass index, were associated with a higher probability of developing at least one complication after trauma. Additionally, we observed a J-shaped curve when analyzing body mass index and mortality, suggesting that both high and low body mass indexes are positively associated with mortality. In fact, morbidly obese patients had the highest mortality rate, followed by underweight patients (p < .001). Interestingly, however, multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that, compared with normal weight body mass index, overweight and obese body mass indexes were independently associated with 9.6% and 10.5% lower odds of mortality, respectively (p < .001 and p = .001). CONCLUSION: Irrespective of preexisting comorbidities, injury severity score, and mechanism of injury, underweight, overweight, obese, severely obese, and morbidly obese body mass indexes were independently associated with higher risks of morbidity, whereas overweight and obese body mass indexes were associated with lower mortality risks. These findings emphasize the complex relationship between body mass index and clinical outcomes for trauma patients.


Subject(s)
Obesity, Morbid , Body Mass Index , Hospitalization , Humans , Morbidity , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Thinness/complications , Thinness/epidemiology
4.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 13: 21501327211058982, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35249418

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Perinatal factors including gestational age, birthweight, size for gestational age, delivery route, maternal parity, maternal age, maternal education, socioeconomic status, race, and sex, are associated with the future risk of obesity and co-morbid conditions. This study evaluated the relationship of birthweight for gestational age and perinatal factors with severe obesity and dyslipidemia in adulthood. METHODS: We conducted a population-based, retrospective birth cohort study of infants born to residents of Olmsted County, MN between 1976 and 1982. Outcomes were assessed after age 18 years until October 2020, including severe obesity (BMI ≥ 40 kg/m2) and dyslipidemia (total cholesterol ≥200 mg/dL, non-high density lipoprotein [non-HDL] cholesterol ≥145 mg/dL or HDL cholesterol <40 mg/dL). We obtained mother's age, education level, and parity as well as newborn sex, race, type of delivery, single/multiple birth, gestational age, and birthweight from birth certificate data. Individual-level socioeconomic status (SES) of the household at birth was determined with the HOUSES index. RESULTS: Of 10 938 birth cohort subjects, 7394 had clinic visits after age 18 years and were included, with 2630 having severe obesity (n = 798) or dyslipidemia (n = 2357) as adults. In multivariable models, female sex, singleton birth, less maternal education, and lower SES defined by HOUSES were independently associated with an increased risk of severe obesity in adulthood. Non-white race, singleton birth, and lower birthweight were independently associated with adult dyslipidemia. Birthweight for gestational age was not associated with severe obesity or dyslipidemia. CONCLUSION: Perinatal factors were associated with both severe obesity and dyslipidemia in adulthood. Lower SES at birth was predictive of severe obesity in adulthood, highlighting the opportunity to investigate modifiable perinatal social determinants to reduce the risk of severe obesity.


Subject(s)
Dyslipidemias , Obesity, Morbid , Adolescent , Adult , Birth Weight , Cohort Studies , Dyslipidemias/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Pregnancy , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
5.
Tunis Med ; 99(6): 669-675, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35244920

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Facing the repeated failures of the medical management of obesity, bariatric surgery offers a promising therapeutic option in terms of achieving weight loss and metabolic benefits. AIM: To evaluate the impact of sleeve gastrectomy on the carbohydrate profile of a group of obese subjects. METHODS: It is a prospective study including 40 obese patients (7 Men and 33 Women) who underwent sleeve gastrectomy between 2016 and 2018. Clinical and biological parameters were collected before the intervention, at six months and one year after. Insulin resistance was defined by a HOMA-IR index ≥2.4. Remission of diabetes was determined using the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery's (ASMBS) criteria. RESULTS: The mean patients' age was 34.65 ± 8.17 years. The mean body mass index (BMI) was 50.23 ± 8.3 kg/m². One year after sleeve gastrectomy, the frequency of insulin resistance, decreased from 89% to 4% (p<0.05). The evolution of carbohydrate tolerance abnormalities was marked by the diabetes and prediabetes remission in 75% and 100% of cases, respectively. The mean excess weight loss was 55.8% at 12 months. CONCLUSION: These results have expanded our knowledge of the short-term sleeve gastrectomy's effectiveness on the carbohydrate profile of obese subjects. However, it would be interesting to check the durability of this metabolic benefit in the medium and long term.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Laparoscopy , Obesity, Morbid , Adult , Body Mass Index , Carbohydrates , Female , Gastrectomy/methods , Humans , Laparoscopy/methods , Male , Obesity/complications , Obesity/surgery , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Prospective Studies , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 6(2)2022 02 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35171855

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Obesity is a public health epidemic that is projected to grow in coming years. Observational data on the epidemiologic profile and immediate postoperative outcomes of obesity and morbid obesity after revision total knee arthroplasty (rTKA) are limited. METHODS: Discharge data from the National Inpatient Sample was used to identify patients who underwent rTKA from 2006 to 2015. Patients were stratified into morbidly obese, obese, and not obese control cohorts. An analysis was performed to compare etiology of revision, demographic and medical comorbidity profiles, and immediate in-hospital economic and complication outcomes after rTKA. RESULTS: An estimated 605,603 rTKAs were included in this analysis. Morbidly obese and obese patients were at significantly higher risk for any complication than not obese patients. Patients with obesity were associated with an increased risk of postoperative anemia but a lower risk of peripheral vascular disease and gastrointestinal, and hematoma/seroma complications compared with not obese patients. Patients with morbid obesity were associated with an increased risk of any, hematoma/seroma, wound dehiscence, postoperative infection, pulmonary embolism, and postoperative anemia complications and a lower risk of gastrointestinal complications when compared with not obese patients. Morbidly obese patients had a significantly longer length of stay than both obese and not obese patients, while no significant difference in length of stay was observed between obese and not obese patients. DISCUSSION: Morbidly obese patients are at higher odds for worse postoperative medical and economic outcomes compared with those with obesity after rTKA. As the number of patients with obesity and morbid obesity continues to rise, these risk factors should be considered in preoperative discussions and perioperative protocol optimization.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee , Obesity, Morbid , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee/adverse effects , Comorbidity , Demography , Humans , Inpatients , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery
7.
Clin Cardiol ; 45(4): 407-416, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35170775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Real-world data on atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation outcomes in obese populations have remained scarce, especially the relationship between obesity and in-hospital AF ablation outcome. HYPOTHESIS: Obesity is associated with higher complication rates and higher admission trend for AF ablation. METHODS: We drew data from the US National Inpatient Sample to identify patients who underwent AF ablation between 2005 and 2018. Sociodemographic and patients' characteristics data were collected, and the trend, incidence of catheter ablation complications and mortality were analyzed, and further stratified by obesity classification. RESULTS: A total of 153 429 patients who were hospitalized for AF ablation were estimated. Among these, 11 876 obese patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 11 422-12 330) and 10 635 morbid obese patients (95% CI: 10 200-11 069) were observed. There was a substantial uptrend admission, up to fivefold, for AF ablation in all obese patients from 2005 to 2018 (p < .001). Morbidly obese patients were statistically younger, while coexisting comorbidities were substantially higher than both obese and nonobese patients (p < .01) Both obesity and morbid obesity were significantly associated with an increased risk of total bleeding, and vascular complications (p < .05). Only morbid obesity was significantly associated with an increased risk of ablation-related complications, total infection, and pulmonary complications (p < .01). No difference in-hospital mortality was observed among obese, morbidly obese, and nonobese patients. CONCLUSION: Our study observed an uptrend in the admission of obese patients undergoing AF ablation from 2005 through 2018. Obesity was associated with higher ablation-related complications, particularly those who were morbidly obese.


Subject(s)
Atrial Fibrillation , Catheter Ablation , Obesity, Morbid , Atrial Fibrillation/diagnosis , Atrial Fibrillation/epidemiology , Atrial Fibrillation/surgery , Catheter Ablation/adverse effects , Hospitals , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/diagnosis , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Risk Factors , Treatment Outcome
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(3)2022 01 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35162597

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Arterial hypertension (HTN) is common among morbidly obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. The aim of this study is to analyse the prevalence and evolution of HTN and weight loss in patients suffering from morbid obesity before and after bariatric surgery, during a follow-up period of five years. METHODS: A before-and-after study was carried out on severely obese patients undergoing Laparoscopic Roux-En-Y Gastric Bypass (LRYGB). Criteria for HTN diagnosis were current treatment with antihypertensive agents and/or systolic blood pressure (SBP) > 140 mmHg and/or diastolic (DBP) > 90 mmHg. HTN remission was defined as normalisation of blood pressure (BP) maintained after discontinuation of medical treatment, and HTN recurrence was considered when HTN diagnostic criteria reappeared after remission. Weight loss during the study period was evaluated for each patient, calculating excess weight loss percentage (% EWL) and BMI loss percentage (% BMIL) with reference to the baseline value. RESULTS: A total of 273 patients were included in the study. HTN was present in 48.2%; 29.4% of hypertensive patients showed HTN remission two years after the surgical procedure, 30.3% of them had relapsed at five years. CONCLUSION: LRYGB in obese patients is associated with a remission of HTN, and no weight loss differences were observed between the group of patients showing HTN remission at two years and the group who did not. However, differences were observed after the second follow-up year, with an increased weight loss in the remission group, which could indicate that sustained weight loss favours the control of HTN.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Hypertension , Obesity, Morbid , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Hypertension/complications , Hypertension/etiology , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(2): e2148317, 2022 02 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35157054

ABSTRACT

Importance: Bariatric surgery is recommended for patients with severe obesity (body mass index ≥40) and type 2 diabetes (T2D). However, the most cost-effective treatment remains unclear and may depend on the patient's T2D severity. Objective: To estimate the cost-effectiveness of medical therapy, sleeve gastrectomy (SG), and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) among patients with severe obesity and T2D, stratified by T2D severity. Design, Setting, and Participants: This economic evaluation used a microsimulation model to project health and cost outcomes of medical therapy, SG, and RYGB over 5 years. Time horizons varied between 10 and 30 years in sensitivity analyses. Model inputs were derived from clinical trials, large cohort studies, national databases, and published literature. Probabilistic sampling of model inputs accounted for parameter uncertainty. Estimates of US adults with severe obesity and T2D were derived from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Data analysis was performed from January 2020 to August 2021. Exposures: Medical therapy, SG, and RYGB. Main Outcomes and Measures: Quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs), costs (in 2020 US dollars), and incremental cost-effectiveness ratios (ICERs) were projected, with future cost and QALYs discounted 3.0% annually. A strategy was deemed cost-effective if the ICER was less than $100 000 per QALY. The preferred strategy resulted in the greatest number of QALYs gained while being cost-effective. Results: The model simulated 1000 cohorts of 10 000 patients, of whom 16% had mild T2D, 56% had moderate T2D, and 28% had severe T2D at baseline. The mean age of simulated patients was 54.6 years (95% CI, 54.2-55.0 years), 61.6% (95% CI, 60.1%-63.4%) were female, and 65.1% (95% CI, 63.6%-66.7%) were non-Hispanic White. Compared with medical therapy over 5 years, RYGB was associated with the most QALYs gained in the overall population (mean, 0.44 QALY; 95% CI, 0.21-0.86 QALY) and when stratified by baseline T2D severity: mild (mean, 0.59 QALY; 95% CI, 0.35-0.98 QALY), moderate (mean, 0.50 QALY; 95% CI, 0.25-0.88 QALY), and severe (mean, 0.30 QALY; 95% CI, 0.07-0.79 QALY). RYGB was the preferred strategy in the overall population (ICER, $46 877 per QALY; 83.0% probability preferred) and when stratified by baseline T2D severity: mild (ICER, $36 479 per QALY; 73.7% probability preferred), moderate (ICER, $37 056 per QALY; 85.6% probability preferred), and severe (ICER, $98 940 per QALY; 40.2% probability preferred). The cost-effectiveness of RYGB improved over a longer time horizon. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of bariatric surgery vary by baseline severity of T2D. Over a 5-year time horizon, RYGB is projected to be the preferred treatment strategy for patients with severe obesity regardless of baseline T2D severity.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/economics , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Gastric Bypass/economics , Health Care Costs/statistics & numerical data , Obesity, Morbid/economics , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Adult , Cost-Benefit Analysis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
10.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 10(3): 167-176, 2022 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35148818

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: A novel data-driven classification of type 2 diabetes has been proposed to personalise anti-diabetic treatment according to phenotype. One subgroup, severe insulin-resistant diabetes (SIRD), is characterised by mild hyperglycaemia but marked hyperinsulinaemia, and presents an increased risk of diabetic nephropathy. We hypothesised that patients with SIRD could particularly benefit from metabolic surgery. METHODS: We retrospectively related the newly defined clusters with the response to metabolic surgery in participants with type 2 diabetes from independent cohorts in France (the Atlas Biologique de l'Obésite Sévère [ABOS] cohort, n=368; participants underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass or sleeve gastrectomy between Jan 1, 2006, and Dec 12, 2017) and Brazil (the metabolic surgery cohort of the German Hospital of San Paulo, n=121; participants underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass between April 1, 2008, and March 20, 2016). The study outcomes were type 2 diabetes remission and improvement of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR). FINDINGS: At baseline, 34 (9%) of 368 patients, 314 (85%) of 368 patients, and 17 (5%) of 368 patients were classified as having SIRD, mild obesity-related diabetes (MOD), and severe insulin deficient diabetes (SIDD) in the ABOS cohort, respectively, and in the São Paulo cohort, ten (8%) of 121 patients, 83 (69%) of 121 patients, and 25 (21%) of 121 patients were classified as having SIRD, MOD, and SIDD, respectively. At 1 year, type 2 diabetes remission was reported in 26 (81%) of 32 and nine (90%) of ten patients with SIRD, 167 (55%) of 306 and 42 (51%) of 83 patients with MOD, and two (13%) of 16 and nine (36%) of 25 patients with SIDD, in the ABOS and São Paulo cohorts, respectively. The mean eGFR was lower in patients with SIRD at baseline and increased postoperatively in these patients in both cohorts. In multivariable analysis, SIRD was associated with more frequent type 2 diabetes remission (odds ratio 4·3, 95% CI 1·8-11·2; p=0·0015), and an increase in eGFR (mean effect size 13·1 ml/min per 1·73 m2, 95% CI 3·6-22·7; p=0·0070). INTERPRETATION: Patients in the SIRD subgroup had better outcomes after metabolic surgery, both in terms of type 2 diabetes remission and renal function, with no additional surgical risk. Data-driven classification might help to refine the indications for metabolic surgery. FUNDING: Agence Nationale de la Recherche, Investissement d'Avenir, Innovative Medecines Initiative, Fondation Cœur et Artères, and Fondation Francophone pour la Recherche sur le Diabète.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Gastric Bypass , Insulin Resistance , Obesity, Morbid , Brazil , Cohort Studies , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/surgery , Gastric Bypass/adverse effects , Humans , Insulin , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome
11.
J Arthroplasty ; 37(5): 874-879, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35124192

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity is associated with higher rates of adverse outcomes following primary total hip arthroplasty (THA). The purpose of this study is to utilize 3 national databases to develop projections of obesity within the general population and primary THA patients in the United States through 2029. METHODS: Data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), the Behavior Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were queried for years 1999-2019. Current Procedural Terminology code 27130 was used to identify primary THA patients in NSQIP. Individuals were categorized according to body mass index (kg/m2) by year: normal weight (≤24.9); overweight (25.0-29.9); obese (30.0-39.9); and morbidly obese (≥40). Multinomial logistic regression was used to project categorical body mass index data for years 2020-2029. RESULTS: A total of 8,222,013 individuals were included (7,986,414 BRFSS, 235,599 NSQIP THA). From 2011 to 2019, the prevalence of normal weight and overweight individuals declined in the general population (BRFSS) and in primary THA. Prevalence of obese/morbidly obese individuals increased in the general population from 31% to 36% and in primary THA from 42% to 49%. Projection models estimate that by 2029, 46% of the general population will be obese/morbidly obese and 55% of primary THA will be obese/morbidly obese. CONCLUSION: By 2029, we estimate ≥55% of primary THA to be obese/morbidly obese. Increased resources dedicated to care pathways and research focused on improving outcomes in obese arthroplasty patients will be necessary as this population continues to grow. LEVEL OF EVIDENCE: Level III, Retrospective Cohort Study.


Subject(s)
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip , Obesity, Morbid , Arthroplasty, Replacement, Hip/adverse effects , Body Mass Index , Humans , Nutrition Surveys , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Overweight/complications , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , United States/epidemiology
12.
Surg Obes Relat Dis ; 18(4): 520-529, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35094921

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Patients over 60 years old undergoing bariatric surgery is still increasing. OBJECTIVES: First, to assess the impact of age (>60 years) on the 90-day morbidity and mortality of both laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) and sleeve gastrectomy (LSG), and second, to determine the effectiveness of surgical weight loss and resolution of obesity-related comorbidities for patients 60 years of age and older over a 2-year period. SETTING: Bicentric study from University Hospital of Caen and Memorial Hospital of Saint Lô, France. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of a prospectively maintained database of patients with morbid obesity undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery from October 2005 to April 2019. Patients 60 years of age and older were defined as cases (elderly group [EG], n = 137), and patients younger than 60 years of age were defined as controls (young group [YG], n = 1544). The primary endpoint of the study was the prevalence of severe postoperative complications within 90 days of surgery determined by a propensity-score-matching (PSM) analysis. RESULTS: The PSM population included 133 patients in the EG who were matched 1:2 with 266 patients in the YG. There was no mortality in either group. Although not significant (with an absolute difference of 4.5% between the EG and the YG), the odds of severe postoperative complications were 2.5 times higher in the EG than in the YG (7.5% versus 3.0%, P = .053). At 90 days postoperatively, the prevalences of overall morbidity (31.6% versus 22.9%, P = .044), leakage (5.3% versus 1.1%, P = .026), and reoperation (5.3% versus 1.1%, P = .026) were significantly higher in the EG than in the YG. CONCLUSION: This propensity-matched study suggests that laparoscopic bariatric surgery is probably an effective treatment in obese elderly patients (EPs) in terms of weight loss and resolution of comorbidities. However, the EP should be warned of the increased risk of severe postoperative complications within 90 days, including leakage and reoperation rates, especially after RYGB.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Gastric Bypass , Laparoscopy , Obesity, Morbid , Aged , Bariatric Surgery/adverse effects , Gastrectomy/adverse effects , Gastrectomy/methods , Gastric Bypass/adverse effects , Gastric Bypass/methods , Humans , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Laparoscopy/methods , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Weight Loss
13.
Eur J Intern Med ; 98: 98-104, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35067415

ABSTRACT

AIM: To assess the effect of obesity status (no obesity/obesity/ morbid obesity) on hospital outcomes (length of hospital stay [LOHS] and in-hospital mortality [IHM]), among patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and according to sex. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study based on national hospital discharge data of all subjects aged≥ 18 years hospitalized with CAP in Spain from 2016 to 2019. RESULTS: We identified 519,750 hospital discharges with CAP. The prevalence of obesity was 6.38% and 1.78%. for morbid obesity. The mean age was higher for patients without obesity followed by those with obesity and morbid obesity (74.61, 72.5 and 70.2 years respectively; p<0.001). The mean number of comorbidities was similar for patients with obesity and morbid obesity (2.30 and 2.29) and significantly higher than for non-obese individuals (2.10). The crude IHM was higher among the non-obese patients (12.71%) followed by those with morbid obesity (8.56%) and obesity (7.72%), without finding differences between men and women. Among men, after multivariable logistic regression analysis, the probability of dying in the hospital was significantly lower for those with obesity (Adjusted-OR 0.59;95%CI 0.55-0.63) and morbid obesity (Adjusted-OR 0.62;95%CI 0.54-0.71) compared with non-obese. The protective effect of obesity (Adjusted-OR 0.71;95%CI 0.67-0.75) and morbid obesity (Adjusted OR 0.73;95%CI 0.66-0.8) was also observed among women. CONCLUSIONS: Obese and obesity morbid patients with CAP have a lower risk of IHM than non-obese patients, without sex differences in this association. These data confirm the existence of the obesity paradox in this patient population.


Subject(s)
Community-Acquired Infections , Obesity, Morbid , Pneumonia , Cohort Studies , Community-Acquired Infections/epidemiology , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Incidence , Male , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Sex Characteristics , Spain/epidemiology
14.
J Surg Res ; 273: 119-126, 2022 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35065317

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Upper gastrointestinal (UGI) pathologies are common in adolescents with obesity. This study aims to determine the prevalence of UGI inflammation on preoperative esophagogastroduodenoscopy (EGD) in adolescents undergoing sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and to assess weight loss outcomes. METHODS: This is a retrospective analysis of pathology reports from EGD biopsies performed prior to SG from September 2017 to August 2020. Percentage weight loss was measured at 3, 6, and 12 mo after surgery. Percent total body weight loss (TBWL) was compared between patients with and without UGI inflammation. RESULTS: Thirty adolescents underwent laparoscopic SG. Mean TBWL was 22% of total body weight 12 mo after surgery. Preoperative EGD identified 9 (30%) patients with esophagitis, 10 (33%) with gastritis, and 9 (30%) with duodenitis. Twenty-one patients (70%) had inflammation of at least one area, 5 (17%) were Helicobacter pylori positive, and 1 (3%) had a gastric ulcer that delayed surgery. Five (17%) patients were taking antacids prior to EGD. Patients with preoperative gastric or duodenal inflammation had significantly less TBWL 12 mo after SG compared to patients without gastric (24.6% versus 16.7%, P = 0.04) or duodenal inflammation (25.7% versus 14.1%, P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: There is a high prevalence of UGI inflammation in adolescents undergoing SG. Gastric and duodenal inflammation is associated with less TBWL after SG.


Subject(s)
Gastric Bypass , Laparoscopy , Obesity, Morbid , Adolescent , Gastrectomy/adverse effects , Humans , Inflammation/epidemiology , Inflammation/etiology , Inflammation/surgery , Obesity/surgery , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Prevalence , Retrospective Studies , Weight Loss
15.
Can J Surg ; 65(1): E38-E44, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35042719

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In Ontario, bariatric surgery is publicly funded and is performed only in accredited tertiary care hospitals. The purpose of our study was to report on the safety and outcomes of performing bariatric surgery at an ambulatory site of a tertiary care hospital in southern Ontario. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective cohort study of all adult (age ≥ 18 yr) patients who underwent primary laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGB) or laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (LSG) at the ambulatory site of our tertiary care hospital between September 2016 and August 2018. The 2 sites are 1.4 km apart. Patient demographic characteristics, duration of surgery, intraoperative and 90-day postoperative complications, number of transfers and readmission to the tertiary care hospital, and emergency department visits were collected. RESULTS: A total of 314 patients (285 women [90.8%] and 29 men [9.2%] with a mean age of 41.8 yr [standard deviation (SD) 8.9 yr]) underwent surgery: LRYGB in 295 cases (93.9%) and LSG in 19 (6.0%). The mean body mass index was 45.3 (SD 5.1), the median American Society of Anesthesiologists score was 3 (range 2-4), and the median Edmonton Obesity Staging System score was 2 (range 0-4). The mean operative time was 119.8 (SD 23.1) minutes for LRYGB and 96.2 (SD 22.0) minutes for LSG, and the mean length of stay was 2.1 (SD 0.6) days and 2.1 (SD 0.2) days, respectively. Thirteen patients (4.1%) required transfer to the tertiary care hospital for a postoperative complication. Of 312 patients, 29 (9.3%) presented to emergency department within 90 days after surgery, and 8 (2.6%) required readmission to hospital; no deaths were reported. CONCLUSION: The findings suggest that LRYGB and LSG can be performed safely at an ambulatory site of a tertiary care hospital. However, caution should be exercised in performing these procedures at an ambulatory site without a tertiary care hospital affiliation, as patients may require urgent transfer for a serious postoperative complication.


Subject(s)
Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y/statistics & numerical data , Gastrectomy/statistics & numerical data , Gastric Bypass/statistics & numerical data , Laparoscopy/statistics & numerical data , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Outcome and Process Assessment, Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Adult , Anastomosis, Roux-en-Y/adverse effects , Female , Gastrectomy/adverse effects , Gastric Bypass/adverse effects , Humans , Laparoscopy/adverse effects , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Ontario/epidemiology , Outpatient Clinics, Hospital , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers
16.
Obes Facts ; 15(2): 118-134, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-35016185

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Severe obesity among children and adolescents has emerged as a public health concern in multiple places around the world. METHODS: We searched the Medline database for articles on severe obesity rates in children published between January 1960 and January 2020. For studies with available prevalence rates for an early and a more recent time period, the relative increase in prevalence was imputed. RESULTS: In total, 874 publications were identified, of which 38 contained relevant epidemiological data. Rates of severe obesity varied significantly according to age, gender, geographic area, and the definition of severe obesity. The highest rates of class II and III obesity in the USA according to the Centers of Disease Control cut-off were 9.5% and 4.5%, respectively. Seventeen studies reported prevalence rates in at least two time periods. Data for 9,190,718 individuals showed a 1.71 (95% CI, 1.53-1.90) greater odds for severe obesity in 2006-2017 (N = 5,029,584) versus 1967-2007 (N = 4,161,134). In an analysis limited to studies from 1980s with a minimum follow-up of 20 years, a 9.16 (95% CI, 7.76-10.80) greater odds for severe obesity in recent versus earlier time was found. An analysis limited to studies from 2000, with a follow-up of 5-15 years, a 1.09 (95% CI, 0.99-1.20) greater odds was noted when comparing (2011-2017; N = 4,991,831) versus (2000-2011; N = 4,134,340). CONCLUSION: Severe pediatric obesity is escalating with a marked increase from the 1980s and a slower rate from 2000.


Subject(s)
Obesity, Morbid , Pediatric Obesity , Adolescent , Child , Child, Preschool , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Pediatric Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence
17.
Am J Cardiol ; 167: 93-97, 2022 03 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34991845

ABSTRACT

Obesity is an independent risk factor for heart failure in patients with hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HC). In this study, we examined national trends and early outcomes of bariatric surgery for obesity in patients with HC. Using the weighted discharge data from the National Inpatient Sample, we identified adult patients with HC who underwent elective bariatric surgery for obesity between 2011 and 2017. A total of 443 obese patients with HC were identified, and 42% (n = 185) had obstructive HC. The annual number of patients increased from 18 in 2011 to 130 in 2017. Overall, the median (interquartile range) age was 50 (43 to 57) years, and 85 patients (19%) were 60 years or older. Approximately 20% (n = 90) of the patients had heart failure at the time of operation. Atrial fibrillation was present in 83 patients (19%), and 22% (n = 95) of the cohort had a pacemaker or automatic cardiac defibrillator implanted before the operation. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy (72%, n = 318) and laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (25%, n = 110) were the most commonly performed bariatric procedures. Overall, patients stayed in the hospital for a median (interquartile range) of 2 (1 to 2) days. During the hospital stay, there were no deaths, myocardial infarctions, or documented episodes of thromboembolism. In conclusion, bariatric surgery in patients with HC is performed more frequently in recent years and is safe and associated with few perioperative complications. Because of the impact of obesity on long-term survival, clinicians should strongly consider bariatric surgery for obese HC patients who do not respond to conservative weight loss measures.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic , Heart Failure , Obesity, Morbid , Adult , Bariatric Surgery/adverse effects , Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic/complications , Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic/epidemiology , Cardiomyopathy, Hypertrophic/surgery , Heart Failure/complications , Heart Failure/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/surgery , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Postoperative Complications/epidemiology , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Weight Loss
18.
Int J Obes (Lond) ; 46(4): 739-749, 2022 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34974544

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: There is limited long-term data comparing the outcomes of sleeve gastrectomy (SG) and Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) for severe obesity, both with respect to body weight, quality of life (QOL) and comorbidities. We aimed to determine 7-year trajectories of body mass index (BMI), QOL, obesity-related comorbidities, biomarkers of glucose and lipid metabolism, and early major complications after SG and RYGB. SUBJECTS/METHODS: Patients scheduled for bariatric surgery at two Norwegian hospitals, preferentially performing either SG or RYGB, were included consecutively from September 2011 to February 2015. Data was collected prospectively before and up to 7 years after surgery. Obesity-specific, generic and overall QOL were measured by the Impact of Weight on Quality of Life-Lite, Short-Form 36 and Cantril's ladder, respectively. Comorbidities were assessed by clinical examination, registration of medication and analysis of glucose and lipid biomarkers. Outcomes were examined with linear mixed effect models and relative risk estimates. RESULTS: Of 580 included patients, 543 (75% women, mean age 42.3 years, mean baseline BMI 43.0 kg/m2) were operated (376 SG and 167 RYGB). With 84.2% of participants evaluable after 5-7 years, model-based percent total weight-loss (%TWL) at 7 years was 23.4 after SG versus 27.3 after RYGB (difference 3.9%, p = 0.001). All levels of QOL improved similarly after the two surgical procedures but remained below reference data from the general population at all timepoints. Remission rates for type 2 diabetes, dyslipidemia, obstructive sleep-apnea and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) as well as the rate of de novo GERD significantly favored RYGB. SG had fewer major early complications, but more minor and major late complications combined over follow-up. CONCLUSION: In routine health care, both SG and RYGB are safe procedures with significant long-term weight-loss, improvement of QOL and amelioration of comorbidities. Long-term weight-loss and remission rates of main obesity-related comorbidities were higher after RYGB.


Subject(s)
Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Gastric Bypass , Gastroesophageal Reflux , Obesity, Morbid , Adult , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/surgery , Female , Gastrectomy , Gastric Bypass/methods , Gastroesophageal Reflux/complications , Gastroesophageal Reflux/surgery , Glucose , Humans , Male , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/surgery , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Quality of Life , Retrospective Studies , Treatment Outcome , Weight Loss
19.
JAMA Surg ; 157(3): 221-230, 2022 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: mdl-34964827

ABSTRACT

IMPORTANCE: Obesity is an established risk factor for severe COVID-19 infection. However, it is not known whether losing weight is associated with reduced adverse outcomes of COVID-19 infection. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between a successful weight loss intervention and improved risk and severity of COVID-19 infection in patients with obesity. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: This cohort study involved adult patients with a body mass index of 35 or higher (calculated as weight in kilograms divided by height in meters squared) who underwent weight loss surgery between January 1, 2004, and December 31, 2017, at the Cleveland Clinic Health System (CCHS). Patients in the surgical group were matched 1:3 to patients who did not have surgical intervention for their obesity (control group). The source of data was the CCHS electronic health record. Follow-up was conducted through March 1, 2021. EXPOSURES: Weight loss surgery including Roux-en-Y gastric bypass and sleeve gastrectomy. MAIN OUTCOMES AND MEASURES: Distinct outcomes were examined before and after COVID-19 outbreak on March 1, 2020. Weight loss and all-cause mortality were assessed between the enrollment date and March 1, 2020. Four COVID-19-related outcomes were analyzed in patients with COVID-19 diagnosis between March 1, 2020, and March 1, 2021: positive SARS-CoV-2 test result, hospitalization, need for supplemental oxygen, and severe COVID-19 infection (a composite of intensive care unit admission, need for mechanical ventilation, or death). RESULTS: A total of 20 212 patients (median [IQR] age, 46 [35-57] years; 77.6% female individuals [15 690]) with a median (IQR) body mass index of 45 (41-51) were enrolled. The overall median (IQR) follow-up duration was 6.1 (3.8-9.0) years. Before the COVID-19 outbreak, patients in the surgical group compared with control patients lost more weight (mean difference at 10 years from baseline: 18.6 [95% CI, 18.4-18.7] percentage points; P < .001) and had a 53% lower 10-year cumulative incidence of all-cause non-COVID-19 mortality (4.7% [95% CI, 3.7%-5.7%] vs 9.4% [95% CI, 8.7%-10.1%]; P < .001). Of the 20 212 enrolled patients, 11 809 were available on March 1, 2020, for an assessment of COVID-19-related outcomes. The rates of positive SARS-CoV-2 test results were comparable in the surgical and control groups (9.1% [95% CI, 7.9%-10.3%] vs 8.7% [95% CI, 8.0%-9.3%]; P = .71). However, undergoing weight loss surgery was associated with a lower risk of hospitalization (adjusted hazard ratio [HR], 0.51; 95% CI, 0.35-0.76; P < .001), need for supplemental oxygen (adjusted HR, 0.37; 95% CI, 0.23-0.61; P < .001), and severe COVID-19 infection (adjusted HR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.18-0.86; P = .02). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE: This cohort study found that, among patients with obesity, substantial weight loss achieved with surgery was associated with improved outcomes of COVID-19 infection. The findings suggest that obesity can be a modifiable risk factor for the severity of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Obesity, Morbid , Adult , COVID-19 Testing , Cohort Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity, Morbid/complications , Obesity, Morbid/epidemiology , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , SARS-CoV-2 , Weight Loss
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL