Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 20 de 500
Filter
2.
MEDICC Rev ; 24(3-4): 57-60, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2146583

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Polyserositis is described as inflammation with effusion of more than one serous membrane. There is very little published literature linking it to COVID-19 as a late complication. OBJECTIVE: Present and describe a case of post-COVID-19 polyserositis. METHODS: Data were collected from the medical record of a female patient admitted for fainting spells and marked weakness. The patient underwent a clinical evaluation, additional hematology, imaging and histopathology tests, and a surgical procedure. The new index, called the abdominal adipose deposit index, was obtained by multiplying the subcutaneous fat thickness by visceral fat thickness, both measured by ultrasound. A cutoff point was established that facilitated discernment of an unhealthy phenotype: normal weight but metabolically obese, a cardiometabolic risk factor. RESULTS: We present the case of a 57-year-old female patient admitted to hospital for fainting spells and marked weakness, four months after COVID-19 infection. She also had a history of obesity, asthma, type 2 diabetes mellitus and a cholecystectomy in December 1992 for gallstones. Clinical assessment revealed pericardial effusion and bilateral pleural effusion, in addition to a tumor-like lesion outside the pericardium, proximal to the right ventricular wall. A surgical procedure and findings from additional tests led to diagnoses of thymic remnants and polyserositis. CONCLUSIONS: This is a case of polyserositis in a post-COVID-19 patient. After other causes of polyserositis were ruled out, and since there is a likely physiological and pathogenic mechanism operating between the two diseases, the polyserositis was determined to be a late complication of COVID-19. To date, it is the second case reported in the world and the first reported in Cuba.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Female , Humans , COVID-19/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Cuba , Inflammation , Obesity/complications , Chronic Disease , Syncope
3.
Eur J Med Res ; 27(1): 243, 2022 Nov 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2117680

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 is an infectious disease currently spreading worldwide. The COVID-19 virus requires angiotensin-converting enzyme 2, an enzyme that plays a vital role in regulating the apelinergic system for entry into target cells. The underlying diseases of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and obesity are risk factors for the severity of COVID-19 infection. This study aimed to compare the serum levels of apelin and nitric oxide in hospitalized COVID-19 patients and non-COVID-19 subjects with and without the mentioned risk factors. METHODS: Serum samples were taken from 69 COVID-19 patients and 71-matched non-COVID-19 participants enrolled in the Kerman coronary artery disease risk factors cohort study. Study participants were divided into eight groups of control (healthy), hypertension, diabetes mellitus, obesity, COVID-19, COVID-19 + hypertension, COVID-19 + diabetes mellitus, and COVID-19 + obesity (n = 15-20 in each group). Serum apelin and nitrite were measured by the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and colorimetric methods, respectively. RESULTS: Hypertensive and obese patients had lower serum apelin compared to the control group. In addition, apelin content was lower in the COVID-19 and COVID-19 + diabetes mellitus groups compared to the non-COVID-19 counterpart groups. Serum apelin levels were positively associated with arterial O2sat. and negatively with the severity of lung involvement. Nitric oxide metabolites were significantly lower in the COVID-19, COVID-19 + diabetes mellitus, and COVID-19 + obesity groups. CONCLUSIONS: The lower apelin and nitric oxide levels in patients with hypertension and obesity or their reduction due to infection with COVID-19 or concomitant COVID-19 + diabetes mellitus may make them vulnerable to experiencing severe diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Hypertension , Humans , Apelin , Nitric Oxide , Cohort Studies , Obesity/complications , Hypertension/complications , Severity of Illness Index
4.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18934, 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113253

ABSTRACT

Body mass index (BMI) distribution and its impact on cardiovascular disease (CVD) vary between Asian and western populations. The study aimed to reveal time-related trends in the prevalence of obesity and underweight and safe ranges of BMI in Japanese patients with CVD. We analyzed 5,020,464 records from the national Japanese Registry of All Cardiac and Vascular Diseases-Diagnosis Procedure Combination dataset over time (2012-2019) and evaluated BMI trends and the impact on in-hospital mortality for six acute CVDs: acute heart failure (AHF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute aortic dissection (AAD), ischemic stroke (IS), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Patients were categorized into five groups using the WHO Asian-BMI criteria: underweight (< 18.5 kg/m2), normal (18.5-22.9 kg/m2), overweight at risk (23.0-24.9 kg/m2), obese I (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), and obese II (≥ 30.0 kg/m2). Age was significantly and inversely related to high BMI for all diseases (P < 0.001). The proportion of BMI categories significantly altered over time; annual BMI trends showed a significant and gradual increase, except AAD. In adjusted mixed models, underweight was significantly associated with a high risk of in-hospital mortality in all CVD patients (AHF, OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.35-1.48, P < 0.001; AMI, OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20-1.35, P < 0.001; AAD, OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16-1.32, P < 0.001; IS, OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.41-1.50, P < 0.001; ICH, OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13-1.22, P < 0.001; SAH, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.26, P < 0.001). Moreover, obese I and II groups were significantly associated with a higher incidence of in-hospital mortality, except AHF and IS. Age was associated with in-hospital mortality for all BMI categories in six CVD patients. BMI increased annually in patients with six types of CVDs. Although underweight BMI was associated with high mortality rates, the impact of obesity on in-hospital mortality differs among CVD types.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Body Mass Index , Thinness/complications , Thinness/epidemiology , Thinness/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Japan/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/diagnosis , Acute Disease , Heart Failure/epidemiology
5.
J Diabetes Res ; 2022: 9652940, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113176

ABSTRACT

Introduction: New onset of diabetes mellitus was noted as the commonest comorbidity in the COVID-19 pandemic, which contributed to a worse prognosis. Existing evidence showed that new-onset diabetes is associated with increased mortality compared to nondiabetic and known diabetic patients in the COVID-19 era. SARS-CoV-2 virus can worsen existing diabetes; at the same time, it can trigger new-onset diabetes that eventually worsens patient outcomes. Thus, this study is aimed at determining the prevalence and factors associated with new onset of diabetes mellitus among COVID-19 patients. Methods: Institution-based retrospective cross-sectional study design was conducted by reviewing 244 patient's records in the Addis Ababa COVID-19 care center. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used. During bivariate analysis, variables with p ≤ 0.25 were transferred into multivariate analysis. Adjusted odds ratios to determine the strength and presence of the association with a 95% confidence interval and p value ≤ 0.05 were considered, respectively. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 53.2 years with (SD = 13.35). The study findings showed that 31.1% (CI: 25.4-37.4) of COVID-19 patients had new onset of diabetes mellitus; of those, 11.8% had type 1 and 88.2% had type 2 diabetes. Being male (aOR = 2.9; 95% CI: 1.2, 7.1), family history of hypertension (aOR = 3.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 10.5), obesity (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.01, 8.9), having pulmonary embolism (aOR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.04), and hyperkalemia (aOR = 9.3; 95% CI: 1.8, 47.3) showed statistically significant association with new onset of diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: A significant proportion of COVID-19 patients had been diagnosed with new onset of diabetes mellitus, and new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common diabetes mellitus type. Being male, obesity, having a pulmonary embolism, family history of hypertension, and hyperkalemia were independently associated with new onset of diabetes mellitus among COVID-19 patients. Therefore, focused interventions need to be strengthened towards the identified factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hyperkalemia , Hypertension , Pulmonary Embolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hyperkalemia/complications , Hyperkalemia/epidemiology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/complications , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology
6.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(42): e303, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of severe outcomes with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) delta variant remains low in children and adolescents, but less is known about its effect on the SARS-CoV-2-naïve population. This study evaluated clinical manifestations and risk factors for moderate-to-critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in mostly SARS-CoV-2-naïve children and adolescents in 2021. METHODS: This multicenter retrospective study included patients aged 0-18 years who were hospitalized with COVID-19 at 8 referring hospitals in South Korea during the predelta-predominant and delta-predominant periods in 2021. Each case was labeled as either hospitalization with medical needs or for isolation. Severity was categorized as mild, moderate, severe, or critical with regard to pneumonia presence and illness severity. RESULTS: Among 753 cases, most (99.5%) had no prior history of COVID-19 or vaccination against COVID-19. The proportions of hospitalization with medical needs (3.5% vs. 19.7%), moderate illness (0.9% vs. 4.0%), and severe/critical illness (0.8% vs. 5.3%) increased during delta predominance. The risk of moderate-to-critical COVID-19 among hospitalizations with medical needs was higher among patients aged 12-18 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-11.8) and with obesity (aOR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.4-19.6) but not among patients infected during delta predominance. However, children with obesity experienced more severe COVID-19 during delta predominance (aOR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.2-29.6). CONCLUSION: Despite its similar severity among most SARS-CoV-2-naïve children and adolescents, the delta variant may affect COVID-19 severity in those with high-risk underlying medical conditions. Underlying conditions, particularly obesity, may cause severe COVID-19 in children and adolescents, warranting strong consideration for vaccinating high-risk children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Retrospective Studies , Hospitalization , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology
7.
Neuroendocrinology ; 112(11): 1039-1045, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088991

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an intriguing infectious condition with multisystemic manifestations and variable outcomes that are influenced by the concomitant presence of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which were previously well established epidemics and therefore are considered global syndemics. Although an enormous progress towards understanding mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection leading to COVID-19 has been made, there are still many areas of uncertainty to clarify. Systemic diseases are characterized by common links that allow integrating apparently unrelated disease manifestations. The authors launch the provocative hypothesis that serotonin is the putative mediator linking the lung, gut, cardiac, neurological, and other systemic manifestations that characterize severe COVID-19 in individuals with diabetes and obesity. In support of a role for serotonin in the mechanisms leading to disease severity are the similarities between acute and post-acute COVID-19 manifestations and neuroendocrine tumors presenting with carcinoid syndrome. Scientific discussion is set by highlighting the available clues that support this working hypothesis to trigger future research aimed at unravelling the molecular pathways underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection that are still far from being fully disclosed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Serotonin , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology
8.
Front Immunol ; 13: 1025495, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2080158

ABSTRACT

Disorders of systemic metabolism can influence immunity. Individuals with obesity are known to have increased inflammation, increased risk to select autoimmune diseases, impaired response to several infections, and impaired vaccine response. For example, over the last decade, it has become clear that individuals with obesity have increased risk of morbidity and mortality from influenza infection. Unsurprisingly, this finding is also observed in the current COVID-19 pandemic: individuals with obesity, particularly severe obesity, have increased risk of poor outcomes from SARS-CoV-2 infection, including increased rates of hospitalization, ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and death. Several studies have now demonstrated a critical role for T cells in the context of obesity-associated immune dysfunction in response to viral infection, and one mechanism for this may be altered T cell metabolism. Indeed, recent studies have shown that activated T cells from obese mice have an altered metabolic profile characterized by increased glucose oxidation, both in vitro and in vivo following viral infection. For that reason, treatments that target abnormal immune cell metabolism in obesity may improve outcomes to viral infection. To that end, several recent studies have shown that use of the metabolic drug, metformin, can reverse abnormal T cell metabolism and restore T cell immunity, as well as survival, in response to viral infection. These findings will be discussed in detail here.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metformin , Animals , Mice , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes , Obesity/complications , Metformin/therapeutic use , Oxidative Stress , Glucose
9.
Aten Primaria ; 54(11): 102469, 2022 Nov.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075932

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the association between chronic noncommunicable diseases and age with hospitalization, death and severe clinical outcomes for COVID-19 in confirmed cases within the mexican population, comparing the first three epidemiological waves of the pandemic in Mexico. DESIGN: We performed an analysis using Mexico's Government Epidemiological Surveillance System database for COVID-19. EMPLACEMENT: Mexico's Epidemiological Surveillance System for Respiratory Diseases. PARTICIPANTS: Mexican population confirmed with SARS-CoV-2 registered on Mexico's Epidemiological Surveillance System for Respiratory Diseases. PRIMARY MEASUREMENTS: The analysed severe outcomes were hospitalization, pneumonia, use of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission and death. The association (odds ratio) between the outcomes and clinical variables was evaluated, comparing the three epidemiological waves in Mexico. RESULTS: Age over 65 is associated with a higher ratio of hospitalization and pneumonia, independent of the effect of chronic comorbidities. There is an interaction between age and obesity, which is associated with hospitalization, pneumonia and highly associated with death. These findings were consistent throughout the three epidemiological waves. CONCLUSION: Obesity, COPD and diabetes in interaction with age, are associated with worse clinical outcomes and, more importantly, death in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Mexico/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Primary Health Care
10.
Nutrients ; 14(20)2022 Oct 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071661

ABSTRACT

Overweight and obesity are associated with chronic low-grade inflammation and represent risk factors for various diseases, including COVID-19. However, most published studies on COVID-19 defined obesity by the body mass index (BMI), which does not encounter adipose tissue distribution, thus neglecting immunometabolic high-risk patterns. Therefore, we comprehensively analyzed baseline anthropometry (BMI, waist-to-height-ratio (WtHR), visceral (VAT), epicardial (EAT), subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue masses and liver fat, inflammation markers (CRP, ferritin, interleukin-6), and immunonutritional scores (CRP-to-albumin ratio (CAR), modified Glasgow prognostic score, neutrophile-to-lymphocyte ratio, prognostic nutritional index)) in 58 consecutive COVID-19 patients of the early pandemic phase with regard to the necessity of invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV). Here, metabolically high-risk adipose tissues represented by increased VAT, liver fat, and WtHR strongly correlated with higher levels of inflammation, pathologic immunonutritional scores, and the need for IMV. In contrast, the prognostic value of BMI was inferior and absent with regard to SAT. Multivariable logistic regression analysis identified an optimized IMV risk prediction model employing liver fat, WtHR, and CAR. In summary, we suggest an immunometabolically risk-adjusted model to predict COVID-19-induced respiratory failure better than BMI-based stratification, which warrants prospective validation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Insufficiency , Humans , Body Mass Index , Interleukin-6 , Obesity/complications , Obesity/pathology , Inflammation/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/complications , Albumins , Ferritins , Risk Assessment , Intra-Abdominal Fat/pathology , Risk Factors
11.
Nutrients ; 14(19)2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2066297

ABSTRACT

Several studies provide evidence that obesity is a significant risk factor for adverse outcomes in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). Altered renal function and disturbances in magnesium levels have been reported to play important pathophysiological roles in COVID-19. However, the relationship between obesity, renal function, circulating magnesium levels, and mortality in patients with COVID-19 remains unclear. In this retrospective cohort study, we characterized 390 hospitalized patients with COVID-19 that were categorized according to their body mass index (BMI). Patients were clinically characterized and biochemical parameters, renal function, and electrolyte markers measured upon admission. We found that in patients who died, BMI was associated with reduced estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR, Rho: -0.251, p = 0.001) and serum magnesium levels (Rho: -0.308, p < 0.0001). Multiple linear regression analyses showed that death was significantly associated with obesity (p = 0.001). The Cox model for obese patients showed that magnesium levels were associated with increased risk of death (hazard ratio: 0.213, 95% confidence interval: 0.077 to 0.586, p = 0.003). Thus, reduced renal function and lower magnesium levels were associated with increased mortality in obese COVID-19 patients. These results suggest that assessment of kidney function, including magnesium levels, may assist in developing effective treatment strategies to reduce mortality among obese COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Renal Insufficiency , COVID-19/complications , Glomerular Filtration Rate/physiology , Humans , Kidney/physiology , Magnesium , Obesity/complications , Renal Insufficiency/complications , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors
12.
Curr Opin Gastroenterol ; 38(6): 592-599, 2022 11 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2063080

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: This review summarizes the key developments with regard to FDA-approved endoscopic bariatric metabolic therapies (EBMTs) in the last 2 years. RECENT FINDINGS: The prevalence of obesity has increased during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, and obesity worsens COVID-19 related outcomes. Several studies have confirmed the safety and short-term efficacy of intragastric balloons (IGBs). In the short-term IGBs may improve steatosis and fibrosis in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease and improve quality of life and mental health. Unfortunately weight loss from these temporarily placed devices is not sustained long-term. Endoscopic sleeve gastroplasty (ESG) may be more effective and durable than IGBs, and result in fewer adverse events compared to bariatric surgery. The recently completed MERIT trial may catapult ESG as a first-line EBMT. Aspiration therapy meets safety and effectiveness thresholds for incorporation into routine practice, but overall acceptance has been lower than other FDA-approved EBMTs. SUMMARY: The field of endobariatrics is rapidly maturing. Significant knowledge gaps remain with regards to combining EBMTs with pharmacologic therapy to improve durability of weight loss. The rapid expansion in the literature supporting safety and long-term efficacy ESG may prompt revision of existing guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gastroplasty , Humans , Obesity/complications , Obesity/therapy , Quality of Life , Treatment Outcome , Weight Loss
13.
Semergen ; 48(8): 101840, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061862

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Obesity is considered a risk factor in severe cases of COVID-19, which has been analysed using body mass index (BMI), an estimator that does not correlate adequately with body fat (BF) percentage. The aim of this study was to analyse the population attributable fraction to BF in severe forms of COVID-19 based on BMI and CUN-BAE. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Multicentre observational prevalence study. Sociodemographic information, personal history, BMI and CUN-BAE were collected in SARS-CoV-2 positive cases from the provinces of León and La Rioja. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals adjusting for age and personal history, as well as the population attributable fraction to BF. RESULTS: Seven hundred eighty-five patients participated, 123 (15.7%) were severe. Age, obesity (both by BMI and CUN-BAE) and personal history were detected as risk factors. 51.6% of severe cases could be attributed to excess BMI and 61.4% to excess BF estimated according to CUN-BAE, with a higher underestimation of risk in women. CONCLUSIONS: Excess BF is a risk factor for severe forms of COVID-19 together with advanced age and the presence of cardiovascular, chronic respiratory or oncohematological diseases. BMI underestimates the risk especially in women, being CUN-BAE the predictor selected for its better estimation of the percentage of BF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Risk Factors
14.
Knee ; 38: A1, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061615
15.
J Crit Care ; 72: 154162, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061477

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The aim was to verify the impact of obesity on the long-term outcome of patients with severe SARS-CoV-2 ARDS. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The retrospective study included patients admitted to the high-volume ECMO centre between March 2020 and March 2022. The impact of body mass index (BMI), co-morbidities and therapeutic measures on the short and 90-day outcomes was analysed. RESULTS: 292 patients were included, of whom 119(40.8%) were treated with veno-venous ECMO cannulated mostly (73%) in a local hospital. 58.5% were obese (64.7% on ECMO), the ECMO was most frequent in BMI > 40(49%). The ICU mortality (36.8% for obese vs 33.9% for the non-obese, p = 0.58) was related to ECMO only for the non-obese (p = 0.04). The 90-day mortalities (48.5% obese vs 45.5% non-obese, p = 0.603) of the ECMO and non-ECMO patients were not significantly influenced by BMI (p = 0.47, p = 0.771, respectively). The obesity associated risk factors for adverse outcome were age <50 (RR 2.14) and history of chronic immunosuppressive therapy (RR 2.11, p = 0.009). The higher dosage of steroids (RR 0.57, p = 0.05) associated with a better outcome. CONCLUSIONS: The high incidence of obesity was not associated with worse short and long-term outcomes. ECMO in obese patients together with the use of steroids in the later stage of ARDS may improve survival.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Retrospective Studies , COVID-19/therapy , Respiratory Distress Syndrome/therapy , Obesity/complications , Adrenal Cortex Hormones/therapeutic use
16.
Rev Bras Enferm ; 75Suppl 2(Suppl 2): e20210059, 2022.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054497

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: to analyze the effects of a multiprofessional remote intervention and telenursing in the treatment of obesity. METHODS: pragmatic clinical trial of intervention, conducted with obese adults. The multiprofessional remote intervention with a nurse occurred for 16 weeks through a messaging application. The application analyzed body composition, hemodynamic and laboratory variables, comparing the results obtained with the group that participated in face-to-face multiprofessional intervention without a nurse. The study investigated the effects of the intervention comparing the intervention groups and the moments through the ANOVA test for repeated measures. RESULTS: Group 1 obtained significance in the variables: percentage of body fat (p = 0.008); blood glucose (p = 0.014); insulin (p = 0.001); abdominal and waist circumference; and HDL cholesterol (p = 0.000). CONCLUSIONS: the effects of multiprofessional remote intervention and telenursing significantly decreased the risk variables for metabolic syndrome in the treatment of obesity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Metabolic Syndrome , Telenursing , Adult , Humans , Metabolic Syndrome/complications , Metabolic Syndrome/therapy , Obesity/complications , Obesity/therapy , Pandemics
17.
PLoS One ; 17(9): e0275251, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054367

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic severely affected the disease management of patients with chronic illnesses such as type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). This study aimed to assess the effect of telemedicine management of diabetes in obese and overweight young and middle-aged patients with T2DM during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A single-center randomized control study was conducted in 120 obese or overweight (body mass index [BMI] ≥ 24 kg/m2) young and middle-aged patients (aged 18-55 years) with T2DM. Patients were randomly assigned to the intervention (telemedicine) or control (conventional outpatient clinic appointment) group. After baseline assessment, they were home isolated for 21 days, received diet and exercise guidance, underwent glucose monitoring, and followed up for 6 months. Glucose monitoring and Self-Rating Depression Scale (SDS) scores were evaluated at 22 days and at the end of 3 and 6 months. RESULTS: Ninety-nine patients completed the 6-month follow-up (intervention group: n = 52; control group: n = 47). On day 22, the fasting blood glucose (FBG) level of the intervention group was lower than that of the control group (p < 0.05), and the control group's SDS increased significantly compared with the baseline value (p < 0.05). At the end of 3 months, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c) and FBG levels in the intervention group decreased significantly compared with those in the control group (p < 0.01). At the end of 6 months, the intervention group showed a significant decrease in postprandial blood glucose, triglyceride, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels as well as waist-to-hip ratio compared with the control group (p < 0.05); moreover, the intervention group showed lower SDS scores than the baseline value (p < 0.05). Further, the intervention group showed a significant reduction in BMI compared with the control group at the end of 3 and 6 months (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: Telemedicine is a beneficial strategy for achieving remotely supervised blood glucose regulation, weight loss, and depression relief in patients with T2DM. TRIAL REGISTRATION: ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT04723550.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Telemedicine , Blood Glucose , Blood Glucose Self-Monitoring , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cholesterol , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/therapy , Disease Outbreaks , Glycated Hemoglobin A , Humans , Lipoproteins, LDL , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/therapy , Overweight/complications , Overweight/therapy , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , Triglycerides
18.
Clin Nutr ESPEN ; 51: 377-384, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2049034

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: Although obesity have been generally shown to be an independent risk factor for poor outcomes in COVID-19 infection, some studies demonstrate a paradoxical protective effect ("obesity paradox"). This study examines the influence of obesity categories on clinical outcomes of severe COVID-19 patients admitted to an intensive care unit with acute hypoxic respiratory failure requiring either non-invasive or invasive mechanical ventilation. METHODS: This is a single centre, retrospective study of consecutive COVID-19 patients admitted to the intensive care unit between 03/2020 to 03/2021. Patients were grouped according to the NICE Body Mass Index (BMI) category. Admission variables including age, sex, comorbidities, and ICU severity indices (APACHE-II, SOFA and PaO2/FiO2) were collected. Data were compared between BMI groups for outcomes such as need for invasive mechanical ventilation (IMV), renal replacement therapy (RRT) and 28-day and overall hospital mortality. RESULTS: 340 patients were identified and of those 333 patients had their BMI documented. Just over half of patients (53%) had obesity. Those with extreme obesity (obesity groups II and III) were younger with fewer comorbidities, but were more hypoxaemic at presentation, than the healthy BMI group. Although non-significant, obesity groups II and III paradoxically showed a lower in-hospital mortality than the healthy weight group. However, adjusted (age, sex, APACHE-II and CCI) competing risk regression analysis showed three-times higher mortality in obese category I (sub-distribution hazard ratio = 3.32 (95% CI 1.30-8.46), p = 0.01) and a trend to higher mortality across all obesity groups compared to the healthy weight group. CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort, those with obesity were at higher risk of mortality after adjustment for confounders. We did not identify an "obesity paradox" in this cohort. The obesity paradox may be explained by confounding factors such as younger age, fewer comorbidities, and less severe organ failures. The impact of obesity on indicators of morbidity including likelihood of requirement for organ support measures was not conclusively demonstrated and requires further scrutiny.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Respiratory Distress Syndrome , Respiratory Insufficiency , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/therapy , Humans , Obesity/complications , Respiratory Insufficiency/therapy , Retrospective Studies
19.
Infection ; 50(5): 1165-1170, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048629

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Metabolic disorders have been identified as major risk factors for severe acute courses of COVID-19. With decreasing numbers of infections in many countries, the long COVID syndrome (LCS) represents the next major challenge in pandemic management, warranting the precise definition of risk factors for LCS development. METHODS: We identified 50,402 COVID-19 patients in the Disease Analyzer database (IQVIA) featuring data from 1056 general practices in Germany. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for the development of LCS. RESULTS: Of the 50,402 COVID-19 patients included into this analysis, 1,708 (3.4%) were diagnosed with LCS. In a multivariate regression analysis, we identified lipid metabolism disorders (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.28-1.65, p < 0.001) and obesity (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.44, p = 0.003) as strong risk factors for the development of LCS. Besides these metabolic factors, patients' age between 46 and 60 years (compared to age ≤ 30, (OR 1.81 95% CI 1.54-2.13, p < 0.001), female sex (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.20-1.47, p < 0.001) as well as pre-existing asthma (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.39-2.00, p < 0.001) and depression (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.09-1.47, p = < 0.002) in women, and cancer (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.09-1.95, p = < 0.012) in men were associated with an increased likelihood of developing LCS. CONCLUSION: Lipid metabolism disorders and obesity represent age-independent risk factors for the development of LCS, suggesting that metabolic alterations determine the risk for unfavorable disease courses along all phases of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Lipid Metabolism Disorders , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Lipid Metabolism Disorders/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Risk Factors
20.
Obes Surg ; 32(11): 3807-3810, 2022 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048520

ABSTRACT

Less is known whether bariatric surgery (BS) is associated with improved outcomes of COVID-19 complications among patients with class III obesity. Using data from the Florida's state inpatient database (SID) in 2020, we performed multivariable logistic regressions to investigate the impact of prior BS on three separate events, including admission due to COVID-19 among patients eligible for BS (non-BS) and those with prior BS, ventilator usage, and all-cause mortality among those admitted due to COVID-19. Of 409,665 patients included in this study, 25,116 (6.1%) had a history of BS. Results from adjusted logistic regression showed that prior BS was associated with decreased risk of admission due to COVID-19 than that in non-BS group. The risk reduction was smaller among those with class III obesity (adjusted odds ratio [aOR]: 0.58; 95% CI: 0.51-0.66; p < 0.001) than those without (aOR: 0.32; 95% CI: 0.28-0.38; p < 0.001). Compared with the non-BS group, aOR of ventilator use and all-cause mortality for patients without class III obesity decreased by 58% and 78% (p < 0.05), respectively. However, these significances disappeared among patients with continued class III obesity after BS. Our findings suggest that patients with continued class III obesity after BS were still at higher risk of severe COVID-19 outcomes than those without.


Subject(s)
Bariatric Surgery , COVID-19 , Obesity, Morbid , Humans , Obesity, Morbid/surgery , Florida/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Bariatric Surgery/methods , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/surgery , Retrospective Studies
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL