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2.
Lancet Diabetes Endocrinol ; 10(7): 488, 2022 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2150876
4.
Sci Rep ; 12(1): 18934, 2022 Nov 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113253

ABSTRACT

Body mass index (BMI) distribution and its impact on cardiovascular disease (CVD) vary between Asian and western populations. The study aimed to reveal time-related trends in the prevalence of obesity and underweight and safe ranges of BMI in Japanese patients with CVD. We analyzed 5,020,464 records from the national Japanese Registry of All Cardiac and Vascular Diseases-Diagnosis Procedure Combination dataset over time (2012-2019) and evaluated BMI trends and the impact on in-hospital mortality for six acute CVDs: acute heart failure (AHF), acute myocardial infarction (AMI), acute aortic dissection (AAD), ischemic stroke (IS), intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH), and subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). Patients were categorized into five groups using the WHO Asian-BMI criteria: underweight (< 18.5 kg/m2), normal (18.5-22.9 kg/m2), overweight at risk (23.0-24.9 kg/m2), obese I (25.0-29.9 kg/m2), and obese II (≥ 30.0 kg/m2). Age was significantly and inversely related to high BMI for all diseases (P < 0.001). The proportion of BMI categories significantly altered over time; annual BMI trends showed a significant and gradual increase, except AAD. In adjusted mixed models, underweight was significantly associated with a high risk of in-hospital mortality in all CVD patients (AHF, OR 1.41, 95% CI 1.35-1.48, P < 0.001; AMI, OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.20-1.35, P < 0.001; AAD, OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.16-1.32, P < 0.001; IS, OR 1.45, 95% CI 1.41-1.50, P < 0.001; ICH, OR 1.18, 95% CI 1.13-1.22, P < 0.001; SAH, OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.10-1.26, P < 0.001). Moreover, obese I and II groups were significantly associated with a higher incidence of in-hospital mortality, except AHF and IS. Age was associated with in-hospital mortality for all BMI categories in six CVD patients. BMI increased annually in patients with six types of CVDs. Although underweight BMI was associated with high mortality rates, the impact of obesity on in-hospital mortality differs among CVD types.


Subject(s)
Cardiovascular Diseases , Heart Failure , Myocardial Infarction , Humans , Body Mass Index , Thinness/complications , Thinness/epidemiology , Thinness/diagnosis , Hospital Mortality , Cardiovascular Diseases/epidemiology , Japan/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/diagnosis , Acute Disease , Heart Failure/epidemiology
5.
J Diabetes Res ; 2022: 9652940, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2113176

ABSTRACT

Introduction: New onset of diabetes mellitus was noted as the commonest comorbidity in the COVID-19 pandemic, which contributed to a worse prognosis. Existing evidence showed that new-onset diabetes is associated with increased mortality compared to nondiabetic and known diabetic patients in the COVID-19 era. SARS-CoV-2 virus can worsen existing diabetes; at the same time, it can trigger new-onset diabetes that eventually worsens patient outcomes. Thus, this study is aimed at determining the prevalence and factors associated with new onset of diabetes mellitus among COVID-19 patients. Methods: Institution-based retrospective cross-sectional study design was conducted by reviewing 244 patient's records in the Addis Ababa COVID-19 care center. Descriptive statistics and binary logistic regression were used. During bivariate analysis, variables with p ≤ 0.25 were transferred into multivariate analysis. Adjusted odds ratios to determine the strength and presence of the association with a 95% confidence interval and p value ≤ 0.05 were considered, respectively. Results: The mean age of the study participants was 53.2 years with (SD = 13.35). The study findings showed that 31.1% (CI: 25.4-37.4) of COVID-19 patients had new onset of diabetes mellitus; of those, 11.8% had type 1 and 88.2% had type 2 diabetes. Being male (aOR = 2.9; 95% CI: 1.2, 7.1), family history of hypertension (aOR = 3.7; 95% CI: 1.3, 10.5), obesity (aOR = 3.1; 95% CI: 1.01, 8.9), having pulmonary embolism (aOR = 0.2; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.04), and hyperkalemia (aOR = 9.3; 95% CI: 1.8, 47.3) showed statistically significant association with new onset of diabetes mellitus. Conclusion: A significant proportion of COVID-19 patients had been diagnosed with new onset of diabetes mellitus, and new-onset type 2 diabetes mellitus is the most common diabetes mellitus type. Being male, obesity, having a pulmonary embolism, family history of hypertension, and hyperkalemia were independently associated with new onset of diabetes mellitus among COVID-19 patients. Therefore, focused interventions need to be strengthened towards the identified factors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hyperkalemia , Hypertension , Pulmonary Embolism , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Female , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/complications , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hyperkalemia/complications , Hyperkalemia/epidemiology , Ethiopia/epidemiology , Retrospective Studies , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/complications , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pulmonary Embolism/complications , Pulmonary Embolism/epidemiology
6.
PLoS One ; 17(11): e0277014, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2119257

ABSTRACT

Screening, prevention, and management of non-communicable diseases (NCDs, including obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes) is the core function of Integrated Measurement for Early Detection (MIDO), a digital strategy developed by the Carlos Slim Foundation in Mexico. An extension of this strategy, MIDO COVID, was developed to address the need for an integrated plan in primary health care during the COVID-19 pandemic. MIDO COVID facilitates planning, surveillance, testing, and clinical management of SARS-CoV-2 infections and the major NCDs and their pre-disease states, to streamline the continuum of care. MIDO COVID screening was applied in 1063 Carso Group workplaces in 190 municipalities of the 32 Mexican states. Staff were trained to screen healthy workers for NCDs using a questionnaire, anthropomorphic measurements, and blood work; healthy individuals returning to work also received a SARS-CoV-2 antibody test. Between June 26 and December 31, 2020, 58,277 asymptomatic individuals underwent screening. The prevalence of obesity, hypertension, and type 2 diabetes was 32.1%, 25.7%, and 9.7% respectively. Only 2.2%, 8.8%, and 4.5% of individuals, respectively, were previously aware of their condition. Pre-obesity was identified in 38.6%, pre-hypertension in 17.4%, and prediabetes in 7.5% of the population. Risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection was highest for individuals with multiple NCDs. Many Mexicans are unaware of their health status and potentially increased risk of COVID-19 and serious complications. As a universal strategy implemented regardless of social factors, MIDO COVID promotes equity in access to health care prevention and early stage detection of NCDs; the information gained may help inform decisionmakers regarding prioritising vulnerable populations for immunisation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2 , Hypertension , Humans , Public Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus, Type 2/prevention & control , Mexico/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Chronic Disease , Hypertension/epidemiology , Hypertension/prevention & control , Obesity/epidemiology
7.
J Korean Med Sci ; 37(42): e303, 2022 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2099099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The risk of severe outcomes with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) delta variant remains low in children and adolescents, but less is known about its effect on the SARS-CoV-2-naïve population. This study evaluated clinical manifestations and risk factors for moderate-to-critical coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in mostly SARS-CoV-2-naïve children and adolescents in 2021. METHODS: This multicenter retrospective study included patients aged 0-18 years who were hospitalized with COVID-19 at 8 referring hospitals in South Korea during the predelta-predominant and delta-predominant periods in 2021. Each case was labeled as either hospitalization with medical needs or for isolation. Severity was categorized as mild, moderate, severe, or critical with regard to pneumonia presence and illness severity. RESULTS: Among 753 cases, most (99.5%) had no prior history of COVID-19 or vaccination against COVID-19. The proportions of hospitalization with medical needs (3.5% vs. 19.7%), moderate illness (0.9% vs. 4.0%), and severe/critical illness (0.8% vs. 5.3%) increased during delta predominance. The risk of moderate-to-critical COVID-19 among hospitalizations with medical needs was higher among patients aged 12-18 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 4.1; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.5-11.8) and with obesity (aOR, 6.9; 95% CI, 2.4-19.6) but not among patients infected during delta predominance. However, children with obesity experienced more severe COVID-19 during delta predominance (aOR, 6.1; 95% CI, 1.2-29.6). CONCLUSION: Despite its similar severity among most SARS-CoV-2-naïve children and adolescents, the delta variant may affect COVID-19 severity in those with high-risk underlying medical conditions. Underlying conditions, particularly obesity, may cause severe COVID-19 in children and adolescents, warranting strong consideration for vaccinating high-risk children.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , SARS-CoV-2 , Child , Humans , Adolescent , Retrospective Studies , Hospitalization , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology
8.
Neuroendocrinology ; 112(11): 1039-1045, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2088991

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is an intriguing infectious condition with multisystemic manifestations and variable outcomes that are influenced by the concomitant presence of non-communicable diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which were previously well established epidemics and therefore are considered global syndemics. Although an enormous progress towards understanding mechanisms of SARS-CoV-2 infection leading to COVID-19 has been made, there are still many areas of uncertainty to clarify. Systemic diseases are characterized by common links that allow integrating apparently unrelated disease manifestations. The authors launch the provocative hypothesis that serotonin is the putative mediator linking the lung, gut, cardiac, neurological, and other systemic manifestations that characterize severe COVID-19 in individuals with diabetes and obesity. In support of a role for serotonin in the mechanisms leading to disease severity are the similarities between acute and post-acute COVID-19 manifestations and neuroendocrine tumors presenting with carcinoid syndrome. Scientific discussion is set by highlighting the available clues that support this working hypothesis to trigger future research aimed at unravelling the molecular pathways underlying SARS-CoV-2 infection that are still far from being fully disclosed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , Humans , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Serotonin , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology
10.
Aten Primaria ; 54(11): 102469, 2022 Nov.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2075932

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the association between chronic noncommunicable diseases and age with hospitalization, death and severe clinical outcomes for COVID-19 in confirmed cases within the mexican population, comparing the first three epidemiological waves of the pandemic in Mexico. DESIGN: We performed an analysis using Mexico's Government Epidemiological Surveillance System database for COVID-19. EMPLACEMENT: Mexico's Epidemiological Surveillance System for Respiratory Diseases. PARTICIPANTS: Mexican population confirmed with SARS-CoV-2 registered on Mexico's Epidemiological Surveillance System for Respiratory Diseases. PRIMARY MEASUREMENTS: The analysed severe outcomes were hospitalization, pneumonia, use of mechanical ventilation, intensive care unit admission and death. The association (odds ratio) between the outcomes and clinical variables was evaluated, comparing the three epidemiological waves in Mexico. RESULTS: Age over 65 is associated with a higher ratio of hospitalization and pneumonia, independent of the effect of chronic comorbidities. There is an interaction between age and obesity, which is associated with hospitalization, pneumonia and highly associated with death. These findings were consistent throughout the three epidemiological waves. CONCLUSION: Obesity, COPD and diabetes in interaction with age, are associated with worse clinical outcomes and, more importantly, death in patients with COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Mexico/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Primary Health Care
11.
Prev Chronic Dis ; 19: E61, 2022 09 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2072122

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Given their central role in supporting children's development, childcare professionals' overall physical and mental health is important. We evaluated the prevalence of chronic diseases, depression, and stress levels during the COVID-19 pandemic among US childcare professionals. METHODS: Data were obtained from US childcare professionals (N = 81,682) through an online survey from May 22, 2020, through June 8, 2020. We used multivariable logistic and linear regression models to assess the association of sociodemographic characteristics with 4 physical health conditions (asthma, heart disease, diabetes, and obesity), depression, and stress weighted to national representativeness. RESULTS: For physical health conditions, 14.3% (n = 11,717) reported moderate to severe asthma, 6.5% (n = 5,317) diabetes, 4.9% (n = 3,971) heart disease, and 19.8% (n = 16,207) obesity. For mental health, 45.7% (n = 37,376) screened positive for depression and 66.5% (n = 54,381) reported moderate to high stress levels. Race, ethnicity, and sex/gender disparities were found for physical health conditions but not mental health of childcare professionals during the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSION: Our findings highlighted that childcare professionals' depression rates during the pandemic were higher than before the pandemic, and depression, stress, and asthma rates were higher than rates among US adults overall during the pandemic. Given the essential work childcare professionals provided during the pandemic, policy makers and public health officials should consider what can be done to support their physical and mental health.


Subject(s)
Asthma , COVID-19 , Heart Diseases , Adult , Asthma/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Child Care , Chronic Disease , Depression/epidemiology , Heart Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2071401

ABSTRACT

Obesity is a prevalent health issue. Evidence suggests that the availability of urban nature may reduce the risks of obesity. However, several knowledge gaps remain. This study explores the relationships between the dose (distance, duration and frequency) of urban nature and demographic factors towards obesity risks among people in Thailand. A total of 111 participants in three urban and peri-urban nature locations answered a survey regarding their distance from green spaces, frequency of visits, and duration of their typical stay, as well as their socio-demographics, and waist-hip ratio (WHR). The results suggested that at least 1-2 h per typical visit to nature predicted low-risk WHR in women. Male participants are more likely to have a high-risk WHR. Increasing age predicted low-risk WHR. Spending more time in green spaces predicted lower odds of high-risk WHR, while distance did not predict the odds. This research is one of the first to study the relationship between time spent in nature and obesity, and one of the first nature and health studies conducted in Thailand. Given that Thailand is one of the countries most affected by obesity in Southeast Asia, this study is relevant and essential. Future research should explore the quality factors of the park with longer duration of stay.


Subject(s)
Obesity , Body Mass Index , Female , Humans , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Risk , Risk Factors , Thailand/epidemiology , Waist-Hip Ratio
13.
S Afr Med J ; 112(9): 747-752, 2022 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067142

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported comorbid disease, including hypertension, diabetes mellitus, chronic cardiac and renal disease, malignancy, HIV, tuberculosis (TB) and obesity, to be associated with COVID­19 mortality. National demographic surveys have reported a high proportion of undiagnosed and untreated comorbid disease in South Africa (SA). OBJECTIVES: To determine the number of individuals with previously undiagnosed HIV, TB and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) among patients hospitalised with COVID­19, and the level of medical control of these chronic diseases. METHODS: We conducted a sentinel surveillance study to collect enhanced data on HIV, TB and NCDs among individuals with COVID­19 admitted to 16 secondary-level public hospitals in six of the nine provinces of SA. Trained surveillance officers approached all patients who met the surveillance case definition for inclusion in the study, and consenting patients were enrolled. The data collection instrument included questions on past medical history to determine the self-reported presence of comorbidities. The results of clinical and laboratory testing introduced as part of routine clinical care for hospitalised COVID­19 patients were collected for the study, to objectively determine the presence of hypertension, diabetes, HIV and TB and the levels of control of diabetes and HIV. RESULTS: On self-reported history, the most prevalent comorbidities were hypertension (n=1 658; 51.5%), diabetes (n=855; 26.6%) and HIV (n=603; 18.7%). The prevalence of self-reported active TB was 3.1%, and that of previous TB 5.5%. There were 1 254 patients admitted with COVID­19 (39.0%) who met the body mass index criteria for obesity. On clinical and laboratory testing, 87 patients were newly diagnosed with HIV, 29 with TB, 215 with diabetes and 40 with hypertension during their COVID­19 admission. There were 151/521 patients living with HIV (29.0%) with a viral load >1 000 copies/mL and 309/570 (54.2%) with a CD4 count <200 cells/µL. Among 901 patients classified as having diabetes, 777 (86.2%) had a glycated haemoglobin (HbA1c) level ≥6.5%. CONCLUSION: The study revealed a high prevalence of comorbid conditions among individuals with COVID­19 admitted to public hospitals in SA. In addition, a significant number of patients had previously undiagnosed hypertension, diabetes, HIV and active TB, and many and poorly controlled chronic disease, as evidenced by high HbA1c levels in patients with diabetes, and high viral loads and low CD4 levels in patients with HIV. The findings highlight the importance of strengthening health systems and care cascades for chronic disease management, which include prevention, screening for and effectively treating comorbidities, and ensuring secure and innovative supplies of medicines in primary healthcare during the COVID­19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Diabetes Mellitus , HIV Infections , Hypertension , Noncommunicable Diseases , Tuberculosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diabetes Mellitus/diagnosis , Diabetes Mellitus/epidemiology , Glycated Hemoglobin A , HIV Infections/diagnosis , HIV Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prevalence , South Africa/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/diagnosis , Tuberculosis/epidemiology , Tuberculosis/prevention & control
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065987

ABSTRACT

In view of persistent stunting and increasing rates of obesity coexisting among children in the era of the Integrated Nutrition Programme, a cross-sectional study was conducted to determined concurrent stunting and obesity (CSO) and related factors using a random sample of child-mother pairs (n = 400) in Mbombela, South Africa. Sociodemographic data was collected using a validated questionnaire, and stunting (≥2SD) and obesity (>3SD) were assessed through respective length-for-age (LAZ) and body mass index (BAZ) z-scores. Using SPSS 26.0, the mean age of children was 8 (4; 11) months, and poor sociodemographic status was observed, in terms of maternal singlehood (73%), no education or attaining primary education only (21%), being unemployed (79%), living in households with a monthly income below R10,000 (≈$617), and poor sanitation (84%). The z-test for a single proportion showed a significant difference between the prevalence of CSO (41%) and non-CSO (69%). Testing for the two hypotheses using the Chi-square test showed no significant difference of CSO between boys (40%) and girls (41%), while CSO was significantly different and high among children aged 6-11 months (55%), compared to those aged 0-5 months (35%) and ≥12 months (30%). Further analysis using hierarchical logistic regression showed significant associations of CSO with employment (AOR = 0.34; 95%CI: 0.14-0.78), maternal education status (AOR = 0.39; 95%CI: 0.14-1.09) and water access (AOR = 2.47; 95%CI: 1.32; 4.63). Evidence-based and multilevel intervention programs aiming to prevent CSO and addressing stunting, while improving weight status in children with social disadvantages, are necessary.


Subject(s)
Growth Disorders , Nutritional Status , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Growth Disorders/epidemiology , Growth Disorders/prevention & control , Humans , Infant , Male , Obesity/epidemiology , Prevalence , South Africa/epidemiology
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065968

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Obesity is a major public health concern worldwide. Latin America has experienced rapid growth in obesity incidence during the last few decades. Driven by confinement measures, a telemedicine program was implemented in March 2020 to give continuity to obese patients' care through a weight loss program led by the endocrinology department in a tertiary care medical center in Latin America. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to describe the clinical experience of using digital health for monitoring and attention of obese patients and description of weight change outcomes of these patients followed via telemedicine during March 2020-December 2020. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study was conducted including 202 patients. A Skillings-Mack test was performed to conduct a subgroup analysis of the medians of the weight over the follow-up period, and a mixed multiple linear regression model was performed to estimate the expected average change in weight over time Results: We observed good adherence to the program, represented by a weight loss of -4.1 kg at three months of follow-up, which was maintained even during the sixth month of follow-up. CONCLUSIONS: Digital Health strategies such as telemedicine can be a helpful tool for both patients and health care providers to support the continuity of care and showing satisfactory results in the management of obese patients.


Subject(s)
Obesity , Telemedicine , Humans , Latin America , Obesity/epidemiology , Obesity/therapy , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods , Tertiary Healthcare
16.
BMJ Glob Health ; 7(9)2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2064141

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The scope of the challenge of overweight and obesity (OAO) has not been fully realised globally, in part because much of what is known about the economic impacts of OAO come from high-income countries (HICs) and are not readily comparable due to methodological differences. Our objective is to estimate the current and future national economic impacts of OAO globally. METHODS: We estimated economic impacts of OAO for 161 countries using a cost-of-illness approach. Direct and indirect costs of OAO between 2019 and 2060 were estimated from a societal perspective. We assessed the effect of two hypothetical scenarios of OAO prevalence projections. Country-specific data were sourced from published studies and global databases. RESULTS: The economic impact of OAO in 2019 is estimated at 2.19% of global gross domestic product (GDP) ranging on average from US$20 per capita in Africa to US$872 per capita in the Americas and from US$6 in low-income countries to US$1110 in HICs.If current trends continue, by 2060, the economic impacts from OAO are projected to rise to 3.29% of GDP globally. The biggest increase will be concentrated in lower resource countries with total economic costs increasing by fourfold between 2019 and 2060 in HICs, whereas they increase 12-25 times in low and middle-income countries. Reducing projected OAO prevalence by 5% annually from current trends or keeping it at 2019 levels will translate into average annual reductions of US$429 billion or US$2201 billion in costs, respectively, between 2020 and 2060 globally. CONCLUSION: This study provides novel evidence on the economic impact of OAO across different economic and geographic contexts. Our findings highlight the need for concerted and holistic action to address the global rise in OAO prevalence, to avert the significant risks of inaction and achieve the promise of whole-of-society gains in population well-being.


Subject(s)
Obesity , Overweight , Costs and Cost Analysis , Gross Domestic Product , Humans , Income , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology
17.
Semergen ; 48(8): 101840, 2022.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061862

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Obesity is considered a risk factor in severe cases of COVID-19, which has been analysed using body mass index (BMI), an estimator that does not correlate adequately with body fat (BF) percentage. The aim of this study was to analyse the population attributable fraction to BF in severe forms of COVID-19 based on BMI and CUN-BAE. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Multicentre observational prevalence study. Sociodemographic information, personal history, BMI and CUN-BAE were collected in SARS-CoV-2 positive cases from the provinces of León and La Rioja. Logistic regression models were used to calculate odds ratios with their respective 95% confidence intervals adjusting for age and personal history, as well as the population attributable fraction to BF. RESULTS: Seven hundred eighty-five patients participated, 123 (15.7%) were severe. Age, obesity (both by BMI and CUN-BAE) and personal history were detected as risk factors. 51.6% of severe cases could be attributed to excess BMI and 61.4% to excess BF estimated according to CUN-BAE, with a higher underestimation of risk in women. CONCLUSIONS: Excess BF is a risk factor for severe forms of COVID-19 together with advanced age and the presence of cardiovascular, chronic respiratory or oncohematological diseases. BMI underestimates the risk especially in women, being CUN-BAE the predictor selected for its better estimation of the percentage of BF.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Humans , Female , Body Mass Index , COVID-19/complications , SARS-CoV-2 , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Risk Factors
18.
Knee ; 38: A1, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2061615
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055247

ABSTRACT

A range of health-related and behavioral risk factors are associated with COVID-19 incidence and mortality. In the present study, we assess the association between incidence, mortality, and case fatality rate due to COVID-19 and the prevalence of hypertension, obesity, overweight, tobacco and alcohol use in the Peruvian population aged ≥15 years during the first and second year of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this ecological study, we used the prevalence rates of hypertension, overweight, obesity, tobacco, and alcohol use obtained from the Encuesta Demográfica y de Salud Familiar (ENDES) 2020 and 2021. We estimated the crude incidence and mortality rates (per 100,000 habitants) and case fatality rate (%) of COVID-19 in 25 Peruvian regions using data from the Peruvian Ministry of Health that were accurate as of 31 December 2021. Spearman correlation and lineal regression analysis was applied to assess the correlations between the study variables as well as multivariable regression analysis adjusted by confounding factors affecting the incidence and mortality rate and case fatality rate of COVID-19. In 2020, adjusted by confounding factors, the prevalence rate of obesity (ß = 0.582; p = 0.037) was found to be associated with the COVID-19 mortality rate (per 100,000 habitants). There was also an association between obesity and the COVID-19 case fatality rate (ß = 0.993; p = 0.014). In 2021, the prevalence of obesity was also found to be associated with the COVID-19 mortality rate (ß = 0.713; p = 0.028); however, adjusted by confounding factors, including COVID-19 vaccination coverage rates, no association was found between the obesity prevalence and the COVID-19 mortality rate (ß = 0.031; p = 0.895). In summary, Peruvian regions with higher obesity prevalence rates had higher COVID-19 mortality and case fatality rates during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic. However, adjusted by the COVID-19 vaccination coverage, no association between the obesity prevalence rate and the COVID-19 mortality rate was found during the second year of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hypertension , Noncommunicable Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Hypertension/epidemiology , Noncommunicable Diseases/epidemiology , Obesity/epidemiology , Overweight/epidemiology , Pandemics , Peru/epidemiology
20.
Infection ; 50(5): 1165-1170, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048629

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Metabolic disorders have been identified as major risk factors for severe acute courses of COVID-19. With decreasing numbers of infections in many countries, the long COVID syndrome (LCS) represents the next major challenge in pandemic management, warranting the precise definition of risk factors for LCS development. METHODS: We identified 50,402 COVID-19 patients in the Disease Analyzer database (IQVIA) featuring data from 1056 general practices in Germany. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was used to identify risk factors for the development of LCS. RESULTS: Of the 50,402 COVID-19 patients included into this analysis, 1,708 (3.4%) were diagnosed with LCS. In a multivariate regression analysis, we identified lipid metabolism disorders (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.28-1.65, p < 0.001) and obesity (OR 1.25, 95% CI 1.08-1.44, p = 0.003) as strong risk factors for the development of LCS. Besides these metabolic factors, patients' age between 46 and 60 years (compared to age ≤ 30, (OR 1.81 95% CI 1.54-2.13, p < 0.001), female sex (OR 1.33, 95% CI 1.20-1.47, p < 0.001) as well as pre-existing asthma (OR 1.67, 95% CI 1.39-2.00, p < 0.001) and depression (OR 1.27, 95% CI 1.09-1.47, p = < 0.002) in women, and cancer (OR 1.4, 95% CI 1.09-1.95, p = < 0.012) in men were associated with an increased likelihood of developing LCS. CONCLUSION: Lipid metabolism disorders and obesity represent age-independent risk factors for the development of LCS, suggesting that metabolic alterations determine the risk for unfavorable disease courses along all phases of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections , Lipid Metabolism Disorders , Pneumonia, Viral , Adult , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Lipid Metabolism , Lipid Metabolism Disorders/complications , Male , Middle Aged , Obesity/complications , Obesity/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Risk Factors
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