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1.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 21(1): 511, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1874999

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Although the World Health Organization and health authorities in most countries recommend that pregnant women receive inactivated influenza virus vaccines, coverage remains low. This study aimed to investigate (1) the proportion of pregnant women who received an influenza vaccination and influencing factors and (2) the proportion of obstetrics and gynecology (OBGYN) doctors who routinely recommend influenza vaccination to pregnant women and influencing factors. METHODS: Two separate, anonymized questionnaires were developed for physicians and pregnant and postpartum women and were distributed to multicenters and clinics in South Korea. The proportions of women who received influenza vaccination during pregnancy and OBGYN doctors who routinely recommend the influenza vaccine to pregnant women were analyzed. Independent influencing factors for both maternal influenza vaccination and OBGYN doctors' routine recommendations to pregnant women were analyzed using log-binomial regression analysis. RESULTS: The proportion of self-reported influenza vaccination during pregnancy among 522 women was 63.2%. Pregnancy-related independent factors influencing maternal influenza vaccination were "(ever) received information about influenza vaccination during pregnancy" (OR 8.9, 95% CI 4.17-19.01), "received vaccine information about from OBGYN doctors" (OR 11.44, 95% CI 5.46-24.00), "information obtained from other sources" (OR 4.38, 95% CI 2.01-9.55), and "second/third trimester" (OR 2.41, 95% CI 1.21-4.82).. Among 372 OBGYN doctors, 76.9% routinely recommended vaccination for pregnant women. Independent factors effecting routine recommendation were "working at a private clinic or hospital" (OR 5.33, 95% CI 2.44-11.65), "awareness of KCDC guidelines" (OR 3.11, 95% CI 1.11-8.73), and "awareness of the 2019 national free influenza vaccination program for pregnant women" (OR 4.88, 95% CI 2.34-10.17). OBGYN doctors most commonly chose 'guidelines proposed by the government or public health (108, 46%) and academic committees (59, 25%), as a factor which expect to affect the future recommendation CONCLUSION: This study showed that providing information about maternal influenza vaccination, especially by OBGYN doctors, is crucial for increasing vaccination coverage in pregnant women. Closer cooperation between the government and OBGYN academic societies to educate OBGYN doctors might enhance routine recommendations.


Subject(s)
Influenza Vaccines/administration & dosage , Influenza, Human/prevention & control , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Gynecology , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Humans , Influenza, Human/immunology , Male , Middle Aged , Obstetrics , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/immunology , Republic of Korea , Surveys and Questionnaires , Vaccination Coverage/statistics & numerical data
2.
J Educ Eval Health Prof ; 19: 11, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865448

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: During the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, the number of abdominal hysterectomy procedures decreased in Indonesia. The existing commercial abdominal hysterectomy simulation model is expensive and difficult to reuse. This study compared residents' abdominal hysterectomy skills after simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following a video demonstration. METHODS: We randomized 3rd- and 4th-year obstetrics and gynecology residents to a video-based group (group 1), a simulation-based group (group 2), and a combination group (group 3). Abdominal hysterectomy skills were compared between before and after the educational intervention. The pre- and post-tests were scored by blinded experts using the validated Objective Structured Assessment of Technical Skills (OSATS) and Global Rating Scale (GRS). RESULTS: A total of 33 residents were included in the pre- and post-tests. The OSATS and GRS mean differences after the intervention were higher in group 3 than in groups 1 and 2 (OSATS: 4.64 [95% CI, 2.90-6.37] vs. 2.55 [95% CI, 2.19-2.90] vs. 3.82 [95% CI, 2.41-5.22], P=0.047; GRS: 10.00 [95% CI, 7.01-12.99] vs. 5.18 [95% CI, 3.99-6.38] vs. 7.18 [95% CI, 6.11-8.26], P=0.006). The 3rd-year residents in group 3 had greater mean differences in OSATS and GRS scores than the 4th-year residents (OSATS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.88-8.46]; GRS: 12.83 [95% CI, 8.61-17.05] vs. OSATS: 3.40 [95% CI, 0.83-5.97]; GRS: 5.67 [95% CI, 2.80-8.54]). CONCLUSION: Simulation-based training using the Surabaya hysterectomy mannequin following video demonstration can be a bridge to learning about abdominal hysterectomy for residents who had less surgical experience during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hysterectomy , Simulation Training , COVID-19/epidemiology , Clinical Competence , Female , Gynecology/education , Humans , Hysterectomy/education , Indonesia/epidemiology , Internship and Residency , Manikins , Obstetrics/education , Pandemics , Simulation Training/methods , Video Recording
3.
BMC Pregnancy Childbirth ; 22(1): 438, 2022 May 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865285

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As COVID-19 continued to impact society and health, maternity care, as with many other healthcare sectors across the globe, experienced tumultuous changes. These changes have the potential to considerably impact on the experience of maternity care. To gain insight and understanding of the experience of maternity care during COVID-19, from the perspectives of women and maternity care providers, we undertook a qualitative evidence synthesis (QES). METHODS: The population of interest for the QES were pregnant and postpartum women, and maternity care providers, who provided qualitative data on their experiences of maternity care during COVID-19. The electronic databases of MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, PsycINFO and the Cochrane COVID study register were systematically searched from 01 Jan 2020 to 13 June 2021. The methodological quality of the included studies was appraised using a modified version of the quality assessment tool, based on 12-criteria, designed by the Evidence for Policy and Practice Information coordinating Centre (EPPI-Centre). Data were extracted by two reviewers independently and synthesised using the Thomas and Harden framework. Confidence in the findings was assessed using the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation-Confidence in the Evidence from Reviews of Qualitative research (GRADE-CERQual). RESULTS: Fifty records relating to 48 studies, involving 9,348 women and 2,538 maternity care providers, were included in the QES. The methodological quality of the studies varied from four studies meeting all 12 quality criteria to two studies meeting one quality criterion only. The synthesis revealed eight prominent themes. Five of these reflected women's experiences: 1) Altered maternity care (women), 2) COVID-related restrictions, 3) Infection prevention and risk, 4) 'the lived reality' - navigating support systems, and 5) Interactions with maternity services. Three themes reflected maternity care providers' experiences: 6) Altered maternity care (providers), 7) Professional and personal impact, and 8) Broader structural impact. Confidence in the findings was high or moderate. CONCLUSION: Although some positive experiences were identified, overall, this QES reveals that maternity care during COVID-19 was negatively experienced by both women and maternity care providers. The pandemic and associated changes evoked an array of emotive states for both populations, many of which have the potential to impact on future health and wellbeing. Resource and care planning to mitigate medium- and longer-term adverse sequelae are required. PROSPERO REGISTRATION: CRD42021232684.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Maternal Health Services , Obstetrics , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Qualitative Research
4.
Obstet Gynecol ; 139(5): 944, 2022 May 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1853236
6.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 659, 2022 May 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1846836

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Telemedicine has grown significantly in recent years, mainly during the COVID-19 pandemic, and there has been a growing body of literature on the subject. Another topic that merits increased attention is differences in patient and family experience between telehealth and in-person visits. To our team's knowledge, this is the first study evaluating pediatric and obstetrics outpatients experience with telemedicine and in-person visit types in an academic maternal and children's hospital, and its correlation with geographic distance from the medical center throughout 2020, during the COVID-19 crisis. METHODS: We aim to evaluate and compare patients' telemedicine and in-person experience for ambulatory encounters based on survey data throughout 2020, during the COVID-19 pandemic, with particular focus on the influence of distance of the patient's home address from the medical facility. A total of 9,322 patient experience surveys from ambulatory encounters (6,362 in-person and 2,960 telemedicine), in a maternal and children's hospital during 2020 were included in this study. The percentage of patients who scored the question "Likelihood to recommend practice" with a maximum 5/5 (top box) score was used to evaluate patient experience. The k-means model was used to create distance clusters, and statistical t-tests were conducted to compare mean distances and Top Box values between telemedicine and in-person models. Logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate the correlation between Top Box scores and patients' distance to the hospital. RESULTS: Top Box likelihood to recommend percentages for in-person and telemedicine were comparable (in-person = 81.21%, telemedicine = 81.70%, p-value = 0.5624). Mean distance from the hospital was greater for telemedicine compared to in-person patients (in-person = 48.89 miles, telemedicine = 61.23 miles, p-value < 0.01). Patients who live farther displayed higher satisfaction scores regardless of the visit type (p-value < 0.01). CONCLUSIONS: There is a direct relationship between the family experience and the distance from the considered medical center, during year 2020, i.e., patients who live farther from the hospital record higher Top Box proportion for "Likelihood to Recommend" than patients who live closer to the medical center, regardless of the approach, in-person or telemedicine.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obstetrics , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Female , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Pregnancy
7.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2068993, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1815826

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In response to COVID-19, the AAMC recommended that hospitals conduct interviews in a virtual setting. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate whether fellowship video conference interviews (VCIs) are an acceptable alternative to in-person interviews from both the applicant and program perspectives. METHODS: Applicants and faculty from a single academic institution with five OBGYN subspecialty fellowship programs were invited to complete surveys regarding their experience using VCIs during the 2020 interview season. Survey responses used a 5-point Likert scale (strongly disagree to strongly agree). Comparative analyses between faculty and applicants responses to survey questions were performed with two-tailed Student's t-tests. RESULTS: 45 faculty members and 131 applicants received the survey. Response rate for faculty members and applicants was 95.6% (n = 43) and 46.6% (n = 61), respectively. Faculty and applicants agreed that the VCIs allowed them to accurately represent themselves (83.7% vs. 88.6%, p = 0.48). Most applicants (62.3%, n = 38) reported a fundamental understanding of the fellowship's culture. The majority of applicants (77.1%, n = 47) and faculty (72.1%, n = 31) agreed that they were able to develop connections during the virtual interview (p = 0.77). Faculty and applicants stated that VCIs assisted them in determining whether the candidate or program, respectively, was a good fit (83.7% vs. 67.2%, p = 0.98). CONCLUSIONS: The VCI fellowship recruitment process allowed OBGYN fellowship applicants and programs to accurately represent themselves compared to in-person interviews. Most applicants and faculty were able to develop relationships over the virtual platform. Although not explicitly assessed, it is possible that the virtual interviews can achieve a suitable match between applicant and program across all OBGYN subspecialty fellowships. The VCI process may be a long-term resolution to minimize both the financial burden and time commitment presented by traditional in-person interviews. Follow-up studies should assess the performance of the virtually selected fellows compared to those selected in previous years using traditional in-person interviews.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Faculty , Fellowships and Scholarships , Humans
8.
Front Public Health ; 9: 744326, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1775910

ABSTRACT

The women's healthcare in North Korea is in poor condition. The present study explored the current state of women's healthcare, especially in the field of obstetrics, in the region with a number of considerations in regards to establishing a better healthcare system. Peer-reviewed journal articles and reports from intergovernmental organizations were reviewed. Data show that many healthcare facilities suffer from shortages of basic amenities. The maternal mortality ratio was 82 deaths per 100,000 live births. The leading cause of maternal death was postpartum hemorrhage. It was also found that many hospitals were unable to provide adequate obstetrical emergency care such as anticonvulsants, antibiotics, and blood products. A long-term roadmap that is sustainable with clear principles and that is not disturbed by political tensions should be established.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care , Obstetrics , Democratic People's Republic of Korea , Female , Humans , Maternal Mortality , Pregnancy
9.
Pan Afr Med J ; 41: 38, 2022.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771774

ABSTRACT

Introduction: COVID-19 pandemic has put unprecedented pressures on obstetrics and gynecology care services. Maternity hospitals have needed to rapidly prepare to provide quality care while preventing the transmission of the infection. The purpose of this study is to describe the key elements of the response to COVID-19 within the maternity ward of the Mohammed VI University Hospital in Marrakech. Methods: a case study was conducted. Data were collected using various administrative documents related to activities in the maternity ward of the Mohammed VI University Hospital during the COVID-19 pandemic. We also conducted semi-structured interviews with professionals at the maternity ward. Qualitative thematic analysis approach was used for the analysis of transcribed data and triangulation, with the analysis of documentary data. Results: the study highlighted phases of design and organization of two maternity ward access circuits. A new circuit for suspicious or confirmed cases of COVID-19 ensured access to quality care for patients, by guaranteeing isolation measures. The access circuit that was commonly used remained functional to consolidate the right of access to tertiary obstetrics and gynecology care while applying protective measures against COVID-19. Conclusion: this study highlights the necessity to draw on the experience of other health facilities, to contextualize local activities and to anticipate work organization in the face of health crises.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obstetrics , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
10.
J Med Internet Res ; 24(3): e31831, 2022 03 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1770897

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Mental health and pregnancy apps are widely available and have the potential to improve health outcomes and enhance women's experience of pregnancy. Women frequently access digital information throughout their pregnancy. However, health care providers and women have little information to guide them toward potentially helpful or effective apps. OBJECTIVE: This review aimed to evaluate a methodology for systematically searching and reviewing commercially available apps that support pregnant women with symptoms of anxiety in order to assist maternity care professionals in identifying resources that they could recommend for these women. METHODS: A stepwise systematic approach was used to identify, select, describe, and assess the most popular and highly user-rated apps available in the United Kingdom from January to March 2021. This included developing a script-based search strategy and search process, writing evaluation criteria, and conducting a narrative description and evaluation of the selected apps. RESULTS: Useful search terms were identified, which included nonclinical, aspirational, and problem-based phrases. There were 39 apps selected for inclusion in the review. No apps specifically targeted women with anxiety in pregnancy. Of the 39 apps included in the review, 33 (85%) focused solely on mind-body techniques to promote relaxation, stress reduction, and psychological well-being. Only 8 of the 39 (21%) apps included in the review reported that health care professionals had contributed to app development and only 1/39 (3%) provided empirical evidence on the effectiveness and acceptability of the app. The top 12/39 (31%) apps were evaluated by 2 independent reviewers using the developed criteria and scores. There was a small negative correlation between the reviewers' scores and app user rating scores, with higher user rating scores associated with lower reviewer scores. CONCLUSIONS: App developers, publishers, and maternity care professionals should seek advice from women with lived experience of anxiety symptoms in pregnancy to locate, promote, and optimize the visibility of apps for pregnant women. There is a lack of resources that provide coping strategies based on current evidence for the treatment of anxiety in pregnancy. Maternity care providers are limited in their ability to locate and recommend acceptable and trustworthy apps because of the lack of information on the evidence base, development, and testing of apps. Maternity care professionals and women need access to libraries of trusted apps that have been evaluated against relevant and established criteria.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Mobile Applications , Obstetrics , Anxiety/therapy , Anxiety Disorders , Female , Humans , Pregnancy
11.
Midwifery ; 109: 103333, 2022 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1768413

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the challenges and opportunities for rolling out a bespoke model of group antenatal care called Pregnancy Circles (PC) within the National Health Service: what kind of support and training is needed and what adaptations are appropriate, including during a pandemic when face-to-face interaction is limited. DESIGN: Exploratory qualitative study (online focus group). Study co-designed with midwives. Data analysed thematically using an ecological model to synthesise. SETTING: Five maternity services within the National Health Service. PARTICIPANTS: Seven midwives who facilitated PCs. Three senior midwives with implementation experience participated in the co-design process. FINDINGS: Three themes operating across the ecological model were identified: 'Implementing innovation', 'Philosophy of care' and 'Resource management'. Tensions were identified between group care's focus on relationships and professional autonomy, and concepts of efficiency within the NHS's market model of care. Midwives found protected time, training and ongoing support essential for developing the skills and confidence needed to deliver this innovative model of care. Integrating Pregnancy Circles with continuity of carer models was seen as the most promising opportunity for long-term implementation. Midwives perceived continuity and peer support as the most effective elements of the model and there was some evidence that the model may be robust enough to withstand adaptation to online delivery. KEY CONCLUSIONS: Midwives facilitating group care enjoyed the relationships, autonomy and professional development the model offered. Harnessing this personal (micro-level) satisfaction is key to wider implementation. Group care is well aligned with current maternity policy but the challenges midwives face (temporal, practical and cultural) must be anticipated and addressed at macro and meso level for wider implementation to be sustainable. The PC model may be flexible enough to adapt to online delivery and extend continuity of care but further research is needed in these areas. IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE: Implementation of group care in the NHS requires senior leadership and expertise in change management, protected time for training and delivery of the model, and funding for equipment. Training and ongoing support, are vital for sustainability and quality control. There is potential for online delivery and integrating group care with continuity models.


Subject(s)
Maternal Health Services , Midwifery , Obstetrics , Female , Humans , Pregnancy , Prenatal Care , Qualitative Research , State Medicine
12.
Arch Gynecol Obstet ; 305(4): 1041-1053, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1767489

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The onset of the COVID-19 pandemic posed an eminent challenge for medical teachers worldwide. Face-to-face lectures and seminars were no longer possible, and alternatives had to be found. E-learning concepts quickly emerged as the only practicable solutions and also offered the opportunity to evaluate whether traditional face-to-face lectures could be translated into an online format, independent of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We offered an e-learning program consisting of lecture notes, screencasts with audio narration, and online webinars that covered topics normally taught in traditional lectures and seminars. To evaluate the learning behavior and quality of our e-learning program, we drafted a questionnaire that students completed at the end of the 2020 summer semester that had been designed to enable a comparative analysis of the different e-learning modules. RESULTS: Voluntary participation in the online courses was high. Survey analysis revealed high satisfaction with and a distinctive preference for the format, even under regular, COVID-19-independent conditions. In general, a positive appraisal of e-learning-especially as a substitute for regular lectures-was found. Students also reported higher studying efficiency. Exam results were equal to those of previous semesters. CONCLUSION: Both acceptance of and satisfaction with our e-learning modules were high, and students displayed increased demand for this kind of e-learning format. We, therefore, conclude that e-learning offerings could serve as reasonable, efficient, student-orientated substitutes for certain medical courses, especially lectures. These curricular adaptations would correlate with the high digitalization seen in students' everyday lives. This correlation may also hold true independent of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Students
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(6)2022 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760580

ABSTRACT

Child maltreatment (CM) is a public health problem with devastating effects on individuals, families, and communities. Resident physicians have varied formal education in CM, and report feeling inadequately trained in identifying and responding to CM. The purpose of this study is to explore residents' understanding of the impacts of CM, and their perceptions of their role in recognizing and responding to CM to better understand their educational needs. This study analyzed qualitative data obtained from a larger project on family violence education. Twenty-nine resident physicians enrolled in pediatric, family medicine, emergency medicine, obstetrics and gynecology, and psychiatry training programs in Alberta, Ontario, and Québec participated in semi-structured interviews to elicit their ideas, experiences, and educational needs relating to CM. Conventional (inductive) content analysis guided the development of codes and categories. Residents had thorough knowledge about the impacts of CM and their duty to recognize CM, but there was less consistency in how residents understood their role in responding to CM. Residents identified the need for more education about recognizing and responding to CM, and the need for educational content to be responsive to training, patient and family factors, and systemic issues. Despite knowledge about the impacts of CM and laws pertaining to mandated reporting, residents reported challenges with responding to concerns of CM. Findings of this study emphasize the need for better training in response to CM. Future educational interventions should consider a multidisciplinary, experiential approach.


Subject(s)
Child Abuse , Domestic Violence , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Physicians , Child , Humans
15.
Med Educ Online ; 27(1): 2054304, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1751978

ABSTRACT

Due to Covid-19, fellowship programs could not conduct in-person interviews during the 2020-2021 interview cycle and were forced to implement virtual interviews. We conducted two nationwide surveys of residency and fellowship Program Directors (PDs) involved in the Obstetrics and Gynecology (Ob/Gyn) Subspecialty Fellowship match cycle to gain a better understanding of virtual interviews from each of their perspectives. 1) Fellowship PDs' confidence in using a virtual platform to holistically evaluate applicants during the 2020-2021 match cycle, 2) Residency PD's perception of virtual interviews and impact on their program's operations, and 3) to assess the desire of fellowship and residency PDs to continue virtual recruitment during forthcoming interview seasons. Two separate nationwide web-based surveys were administered to 1) Ob/Gyn fellowship PDs and 2) residency PDs through SurveyMonkey from July-September 2020 to assess the impact of virtual interviews form each parties' perspective. Surveys solicited demographic information, four-point Likert scale questions, and free response questions Of programs meeting inclusion criteria, 75/111 (67.6%) fellowship PDs and 67/117 (57.3%) residency PDs responded to their respective surveys. Most fellowship PDs believed that they could confidently assess applicants' professionalism (88%) during a virtual interview and (90.7%) felt confident in making a rank-order list. However, only 73.3% were just as confident in preparing a rank list after a virtual interview as they have been with in-person interviews. Most residency PDs (69.9%) believed that virtual interviews made it easier for their program to comply with duty hours, and 76.8% agreed that virtual interviews allowed their residents to accept more interviews than an in-person format. Most fellowship PDs found virtual interviews convenient. However, difficulty in observing social interaction and gauging applicant interest may be the biggest challenge moving forward.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education
16.
Front Public Health ; 10: 808084, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1753415

ABSTRACT

Background: The spread of COVID-19 poses a challenge for obstetrics and gynecology (O&G) residents. In order to improve the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of residents in epidemic prevention and control, reduce work pressure and improve professional skills, effective and sound training models are required to improve the protection of O&G residents from COVID-19. Method: A total of 38 standardized training O&G residents working in Shengjing Hospital of China Medical University in March 2020 was selected. They were randomly divided into intervention and control groups. The control group underwent a protection theory exposition according to the traditional training method, while the intervention group adopted a conceive-design-implement-operate (CDIO) mode, arranged training courses in combination with the O&G specialty, and completed four modules of CDIO. After the training, the theoretical knowledge and practical operation were assessed, and the work stress and occupational identity scales were assessed. The assessment results and scores of the two groups of residents were analyzed. Results: Compared with the scores of the residents in the control group, the theoretical and technical scores of the residents in the intervention group significantly improved (P < 0.05). In the evaluation of organizational management, workload, interpersonal relationship, and doctor-patient relationship pressure, the scores of the intervention group were lower than those of the control group, with a statistical difference (P < 0.05). For the intervention group, the job stress and professional identity evaluation scores were significantly higher than those of the control group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The CDIO model can effectively enhance the theoretical knowledge and practical skills of O&G residents in COVID-19 epidemic prevention protocols to reduce work pressure and improve professional identity. In addition, it provides new ideas, methods, and approaches for future clinical practice training.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Internship and Residency , Obstetrics , COVID-19/prevention & control , Clinical Competence , Gynecology/education , Humans , Obstetrics/education , Physician-Patient Relations
17.
BMJ Sex Reprod Health ; 48(1): 35-40, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1736081

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Abortion became decriminalised in Northern Ireland in October 2019. Until that point there existed no evidence concerning the views of health professionals on decriminalisation or on their willingness to be involved in abortion care. The purpose of this study was to address this lack of evidence, including all categories of health professionals working in obstetrics and gynaecology units in Northern Ireland. METHODS: The online survey was targeted at medical, nursing and midwifery staff working in the obstetrics and gynaecology units in each Health and Social Care (HSC) Trust in Northern Ireland. The survey was issued via clinical directors in each Trust using the REDCap platform. RESULTS: The findings showed widespread support for decriminalisation of abortion up until 24 weeks' gestation (n=169, 54%). The majority of clinicians stated they were willing to provide abortions in certain circumstances (which were undefined) (n=188, 60% medical abortions; n=157, 50% surgical abortions). Despite regional variation, the results show that there are sufficient numbers of clinicians to provide a service within each HSC Trust. The results indicate that many clinicians who report a religious affiliation are also supportive of decriminalisation (n=46, 51% Catholic; n=53, 45% Protestant) and are willing to provide care, countering the assumption that those of faith would all raise conscientious objections to service provision. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this study are very encouraging for the development, implementation and delivery of local abortion care within HSC Trusts in Northern Ireland and should be of value in informing commissioners and providers about the design of a service model and its underpinning training programmes.


Subject(s)
Abortion, Induced , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Humans , Northern Ireland , Pregnancy
19.
Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol ; 272: 30-36, 2022 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1719658

ABSTRACT

Differences in the way health care delivery across countries may have important impacts on health outcomes and can result in inequalities. A questionnaire survey of members of national societies through EBCOG and EAPM was carried out in 2021. A total of 53 responses were received from 26 countries. Most countries reported that routine antenatal care is primarily delivered by medical staff, involving obstetric specialists or family doctors mostly in government-run facilities. Women from minority groups are able to access antenatal care easily in most countries. Less than 10% of women did not attend antenatal care throughout the pregnancy. Most booking for antenatal care takes place in the first trimester and the number of visits range from 6 to 10 depending on parity. Most countries provide routine ultrasound with 2-3 reported scans performed by specifically trained health care professionals. Facilities for prenatal screening/diagnosis of malformations in both low- and high-risk cases varied across Europe. While antenatal care is relatively standardized throughout Europe, important differences still exist in care delivery and accessibility to care. Antenatal preventive strategies appear to be variably available throughout Europe.


Subject(s)
Gynecology , Obstetrics , Europe , Female , Humans , Parity , Pregnancy , Prenatal Care
20.
Front Public Health ; 9: 781562, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1686565

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND AIMS: COVID-19 vaccination has been in the spotlight for almost a year now, both within the scientific community and in the general population. The issue of healthcare workers' (HCWs) hesitancy is particularly salient, given that they are at the forefront of the fight against COVID-19. Not only could unvaccinated HCW spread the disease, but HCWs are also critical messengers in building confidence towards COVID-19 vaccines. The goal of this study was to examine the perception of COVID-19 risk and of its vaccine acceptance among employees (i.e., HCW plus administrative staff) in the Department of Paediatrics, Gynaecology and Obstetrics at the University Hospitals of Geneva, for the purpose of drawing lessons on the determinants of vaccination morale. METHODS: We conducted an anonymous online survey comparing vaccination attitudes among vaccinated and unvaccinated workers in June 2021. It included questions on perception of COVID-19 risks and COVID-19 vaccines. Vaccination was not mandatory in our institution but was strongly recommended. RESULTS: In June 2021, 66% of the 1,800 employees of our department had received two doses of COVID-19 vaccine by the time of the survey. Among the employees, 776 participated (43%) to the survey, and among them 684 (88%) had chosen to be vaccinated. Participants working for longer in a hospital, with a chronic disease and a household contact with chronic disease were more likely to be vaccinated. Doctors were twice as likely to be vaccinated than nurses. Among unvaccinated hospital employees, 48 (52%) responded that they would not change their mind. Further, 35 (38%) were not feeling in danger of contracting severe COVID-19, and 32 (35%) had fears about possible side effects of COVID-19 vaccines that they wanted to discuss with a specialist. CONCLUSION: Our study indicates that, while two-third of the employees had been vaccinated, quite many were still hesitant. The unvaccinated explained their choice by not feeling at risk of complicated COVID-19, and because of fear of possible side effects associated with the vaccine. Investments in COVID-19 vaccine education is a critical component for increasing vaccine acceptance among the unvaccinated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology , Obstetrics , Pediatrics , COVID-19 Vaccines , Child , Hospitals, University , Humans , SARS-CoV-2 , Switzerland
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