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3.
Clin Obstet Gynecol ; 64(2): 392-397, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203758

ABSTRACT

While telemedicine had been utilized in varying ways over the last several years, it has dramatically accelerated in the era of the COVID-19 pandemic. In this article we describe the privacy issues, in relation to the barriers to care for health care providers and barriers to the obstetric patient, licensing and payments for telehealth services, technological issues and language barriers. While there may be barriers to the use of telehealth services this type of care is feasible and the barriers are surmountable.


Subject(s)
Communication Barriers , Health Services Accessibility , Obstetrics , Privacy , Telemedicine , Female , Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act , Health Services Accessibility/ethics , Health Services Accessibility/legislation & jurisprudence , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Internet , Licensure , Obstetrics/ethics , Obstetrics/legislation & jurisprudence , Obstetrics/methods , Obstetrics/organization & administration , Pregnancy , Privacy/legislation & jurisprudence , Technology , Telemedicine/ethics , Telemedicine/legislation & jurisprudence , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration , United States
6.
Am J Obstet Gynecol MFM ; 2(4): 100233, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1064758

ABSTRACT

Background: Telehealth has been successfully implemented for the delivery of obstetrical care. However, little is known regarding the attitudes and acceptability of patients and providers in high-risk obstetrics and whether the implementation of a telehealth model improves access to care in nonrural settings. Objective: This study aimed to describe patient and provider attitudes toward telehealth for the delivery of high-risk obstetrical care in a large healthcare system with both urban and suburban settings and to determine whether the implementation of a telehealth model improves patient adherence to scheduled appointments in this patient population. Study Design: Two self-administered surveys were designed. The first survey was sent to all high-risk obstetrical patients who received a telehealth visit between March 1, 2020, and May 30, 2020. The second survey was designed for providers who participated in these visits. We also compared the attended, cancelled, and no-show visit rates before (March 1 to May 30, 2019) and after (March 1 to May 30, 2020) the telehealth implementation and telehealth vs in-person visits in 2020. We reviewed scheduled high-risk prenatal care appointments, diabetes mellitus education sessions, and genetic counseling and Maternal-Fetal Medicine consultations. Results: A total of 91 patient surveys and 33 provider surveys were analyzed. Overall, 86.9% of patients were satisfied with the care they received and 78.3% would recommend telehealth visits to others. Notably, 87.8% of providers reported having a positive experience using telehealth, and 90.9% believed that telehealth improved patients' access to care. When comparing patient and provider preference regarding future obstetrical care after experiencing telehealth, 73.8% of patients desired a combination of in-person and telehealth visits during their pregnancy. However, a significantly higher rate of providers preferred in-person than telehealth visits (56% vs 23%, P=.024, respectively). When comparing visits between 2019 and 2020, there was a significantly lower rate of no-show appointments (8.49% vs 4.61%, P<.001), patient-cancelled appointments (7.06% vs 4.96%, P<.001), and patient same-day cancellations (2.30% vs 1.35%, P<.001) with the implementation of telehealth. There was also a significantly lower rate of patient-cancelled appointments (3.82% vs 5.44%, P=.021) and patient same-day cancellations (0.60% vs 1.65%, P=.002) with those receiving telehealth visits than in-person visits in 2020. Conclusion: The implementation of a telehealth model in high-risk obstetrics has the potential to improve access to high-risk obstetrical care, by reducing the rate of missed appointments. Both patients and providers surveyed expressed a high rate of satisfaction with telehealth visits and a desire to integrate telehealth into the traditional model of high-risk obstetrical care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Obstetrics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Telemedicine , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Infection Control/methods , New York/epidemiology , Obstetrics/methods , Obstetrics/trends , Patient Preference/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Telemedicine/organization & administration
9.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(6): 151300, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1014805

ABSTRACT

When New York City became the international epicenter of the COVID-19 pandemic, telehealth at Columbia University Irving Medical Center was expanded in the inpatient and outpatient settings. The goals of telehealth during the pandemic were to maintain patient access to care while reducing the risk for COVID-19 exposure for patients and staff. Recommendations are made on how telehealth can be implemented and utilized to accomplish these goals. In the outpatient setting, virtual prenatal care visits and consultations can replace most in-person visits. When visitor restrictions are in effect telehealth can be used to engage support persons in the delivery room. Telehealth innovations can be leveraged to greatly improve care for COVID-19 mothers and their infants during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Obstetrics/methods , Prenatal Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/methods , Academic Medical Centers , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Health Services Accessibility , Humans , New York City/epidemiology , Pandemics , Patient Satisfaction , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Risk Factors , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
10.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(6): 151295, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1005616

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this article is to review key areas that should be considered and modified in our obstetric protocols, specifically: 1) Patient triage, 2) Labor and delivery unit policies, 3) Special considerations for personal protective equipment (PPE) needs in obstetrics, 4) Intrapartum management, and 5) Postpartum care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Obstetrics/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Female , Humans , Labor, Obstetric , Personal Protective Equipment , Postnatal Care/methods , Pregnancy , Triage/methods
11.
Disaster Med Public Health Prep ; 14(4): e19-e21, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-989594

ABSTRACT

An outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has spread worldwide. In this major outbreak, women are a special group, especially pregnant patients. Many problems faced by clinicians are still unclear and need to be solved. As the largest obstetrics and gynecology hospital in North China, here we summarize the diagnosis and treatment process and key points of obstetrics and gynecology patients in our hospital during the period of the COVID-19 pandemic, hoping to provide available information to inform care of obstetrics and gynecology patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Obstetrics/methods , Perinatal Care/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , China/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Obstetrics/trends , Pandemics , Perinatal Care/trends
12.
Am J Perinatol ; 38(4): 398-403, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-968305

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The 2020 COVID-19 pandemic has been associated with excess mortality and morbidity in adults and teenagers over 14 years of age, but there is still limited evidence on the direct and indirect impact of the pandemic on pregnancy. We aimed to evaluate the effect of the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic on obstetrical emergency attendance in a low-risk population and the corresponding perinatal outcomes. STUDY DESIGN: This is a single center retrospective cohort study of all singleton births between February 21 and April 30. Prenatal emergency labor ward admission numbers and obstetric outcomes during the peak of the first COVID-19 pandemic of 2020 in Israel were compared with the combined corresponding periods for the years 2017 to 2019. RESULTS: During the 2020 COVID-19 pandemic, the mean number of prenatal emergency labor ward admissions was lower, both by daily count and per woman, in comparison to the combined matching periods in 2017, 2018, and 2019 (48.6 ± 12.2 vs. 57.8 ± 14.4, p < 0.0001 and 1.74 ± 1.1 vs. 1.92 ± 1.2, p < 0.0001, respectively). A significantly (p = 0.0370) higher rate of stillbirth was noted in the study group (0.4%) compared with the control group (0.1%). All study group patients were negative for COVID-19. Gestational age at delivery, rates of premature delivery at <28, 34, and 37 weeks, pregnancy complications, postdate delivery at >40 and 41 weeks, mode of delivery, and numbers of emergency cesarean deliveries were similar in both groups. There was no difference in the intrapartum fetal death rate between the groups. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic stay-at-home policy combined with patient fear of contracting the disease in hospital could explain the associated higher rate of stillbirth. This collateral perinatal damage follows a decreased in prenatal emergency labor ward admissions during the first wave of COVID-19 in Israel. KEY POINTS: · Less obstetrical ER attendance is observed during the pandemic.. · There is a parallel increase in stillbirth rate.. · Stillbirth cases tested negative for COVID-19.. · Lockdown and pandemic panic are possible causes..


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Disease Control , Delivery, Obstetric , Obstetrics , Pregnancy Complications , Stillbirth/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Delayed Diagnosis/psychology , Delayed Diagnosis/statistics & numerical data , Delivery, Obstetric/methods , Delivery, Obstetric/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Medical Services/methods , Emergency Medical Services/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Israel/epidemiology , Obstetrics/methods , Obstetrics/organization & administration , Obstetrics/trends , Perinatal Mortality , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications/epidemiology , Prenatal Care/methods , Prenatal Care/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Pan Afr Med J ; 35(Suppl 2): 89, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-948205

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Telemedicine is an ideal innovation to achieve social distancing, one of the mitigating strategies during the current Covid 19 pandemic. Zimbabwe effected a 21day lockdown from the 2nd of March 2020 to control the spread of the Covid 19 infection. Free teleconsultation service was provided by the researcher. We sought to determine the effectiveness and acceptability of telemedicine in Obstetrics and Gynaecology during this period. METHODS: We conducted a retrospective and prospective analysis of the messages from the WhatsApp consults for demographic characteristics, type and classification of condition, level of urgency, ability to make a diagnosis and the type of recommendation offered. A follow-up message was used to assess effectiveness of the medical advice given and patient satisfaction. RESULTS: Of 109 women who used telemedicine 67consented. The average age was 31 years and most of the women were married, had university or tertiary college education and were urban dwellers. Forty-nine (73.1%) cases were Gynaecological consults and 51 (76.1%) were elective cases. Twenty (29.9%) and fourteen (20.8%) cases needed elective and urgent hospital referral respectively. A diagnosis was made in 33(49.3%) of the cases from the available information during the consult. Thirty-five (52.2%) cases had recovered whilst 27(40.3%) cases were still waiting further assessments at the end of the follow up. The patients were satisfied with the service in 94% of the cases. CONCLUSION: Telemedicine services provided during the lockdown period were effective and acceptable in managing women with Obstetrics and Gynaecological conditions. Telemedicine should be rolled out during this pandemic to limit risk to patients and healthcare providers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Gynecology/methods , Obstetrics/methods , Telemedicine/methods , Adult , Female , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Middle Aged , Mobile Applications , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction , Pregnancy , Prospective Studies , Quarantine , Remote Consultation/methods , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult , Zimbabwe
15.
J Perinat Med ; 48(9): 925-930, 2020 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-841764

ABSTRACT

Pregnant women may be at risk for more severe manifestations and sequelae of infection with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). At this time, there remain significant evidence gaps to allow for comprehensive counseling of pregnant women and their families, specifically regarding the risks of gestational-age specific maternal outcomes and potential risks of intrauterine or peripartum viral transmission to the fetus or newborn. As maternal fetal medicine providers and consultants, we are uniquely positioned to mitigate the risks associated with maternal infection and to guide the care for infected pregnant women by being able to provide the most current evidence-based recommendations. Such care requires incorporating the rapidly evolving data regarding this virus and its impact on pregnancy, as well as taking a stand to advocate for best scientific and clinical practices to optimize both women's health and public health during this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Perinatal Care/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, U.S. , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Infant, Newborn , Infectious Disease Transmission, Vertical , Obstetrics/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/diagnosis , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , Pregnancy Outcome , Pregnancy, High-Risk , Prenatal Care/methods , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
16.
Int J Gynaecol Obstet ; 151(3): 341-346, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-813312

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the impact of roster reorganization on ensuring uninterrupted services while providing necessary relief to healthcare workers (HCW) in the obstetrics department of a tertiary care center amid the COVID-19 outbreak. METHODS: The COVID-19 rostering response began in April 2020 and evolved in two phases: (1) development of new areas for screening and managing suspected/positive cases of COVID-19; and (2) team segregation according to area of work. The impact of these changes on HCWs and patients was assessed 3 months later. RESULTS: Developing separate areas helped to minimize the risk of exposure of patients and HCWs to those with COVID-19. Residents and consultants worked intensively in clinical areas for 1 week followed by 1-2 weeks of non-clinical or standby assignments, providing adequate opportunity for isolation. Frequent re-evaluation of the roster was nevertheless required as the pandemic progressed. Segregating teams vertically significantly reduced the number of contacts identified on contact tracing and quarantine leaves, while maintaining patient satisfaction with no increase in adverse events. Residents found the roster to be "smart" and "pandemic-appropriate." CONCLUSION: The "COVID emergency roster" helped ensure quality care with minimum risk of exposure and sufficient breaks for physical and psychological recovery of HCWs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Hospitals, Isolation/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/therapy , Female , Gynecology/methods , Humans , India , Male , Obstetrics/methods , Pandemics , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2 , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , Young Adult
17.
J Obstet Gynaecol Res ; 46(11): 2237-2241, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-751664

ABSTRACT

AIM: A nationwide questionnaire survey was performed to evaluate how Japanese Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology (JSOG) members dealt with the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic during the declared nationwide emergency. METHODS: We sent questionnaires to members of JSOG via official email. Participants answered anonymously using Google forms. RESULTS: Two (0.08%) JSOG members had contracted COVID-19. There was a clear decrease in the number of patients scheduled for operation, not only for malignant but also for benign diseases. A decrease in the number of outpatients for infertility treatment was also observed. Polymerase chain reaction testing for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 was available in 20.4% of the facilities. Inpatients and outpatients were requested to wear masks, limit the number of contacts and check body temperature when visiting hospitals/clinics. During parturition care, caregivers and physicians wore gloves, masks (other than N-95), face shields and gowns. About 66% and 80% of the facilities decided to transfer pregnant women if they had asymptomatic and symptomatic infection, respectively. Cesarean section was typically chosen as delivery mode in infected women. CONCLUSION: The COVID-19 pandemic provoked significant changes in obstetrics and gynecology practices in Japan. Apparently, nosocomial infections were largely prevented due to these changes, although some of them might not have been necessary.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Gynecology/statistics & numerical data , Health Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Laboratory Techniques/statistics & numerical data , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Female , Gynecology/methods , Humans , Japan , Obstetrics/methods , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , SARS-CoV-2
19.
J Perinat Med ; 48(9): 892-899, 2020 Nov 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-745671

ABSTRACT

The global spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus during the early months of 2020 was rapid and exposed vulnerabilities in health systems throughout the world. Obstetric SARS-CoV-2 disease was discovered to be largely asymptomatic carriage but included a small rate of severe disease with rapid decompensation in otherwise healthy women. Higher rates of hospitalization, Intensive Care Unit (ICU) admission and intubation, along with higher infection rates in minority and disadvantaged populations have been documented across regions. The operational gymnastics that occurred daily during the Covid-19 emergency needed to be translated to the obstetrics realm, both inpatient and ambulatory. Resources for adaptation to the public health crisis included workforce flexibility, frequent communication of operational and protocol changes for evaluation and management, and application of innovative ideas to meet the demand.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Obstetrics/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Critical Care/statistics & numerical data , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Female , Hospital Administration , Humans , Infant, Newborn , New York City/epidemiology , Obstetrics/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/epidemiology , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , Surge Capacity/organization & administration , Surge Capacity/statistics & numerical data
20.
Eur J Endocrinol ; 183(2): G49-G56, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-701826

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has required rapid transformation and adaptation of healthcare services. Women with gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) are one of the largest high-risk groups accessing antenatal care. In reformulating the care offered to those with GDM, there is a need to balance the sometimes competing requirement of lowering the risk of direct viral transmission against the potential adverse impact of service changes. We suggest pragmatic options for screening of GDM in a pandemic setting based on blood tests, and risk calculators applied to underlying risk factors. Alternative models for antenatal care provision for women with GDM, including targeting high-risk groups, early lifestyle interventions and remote monitoring are provided. Testing options and their timing for postpartum screening in women who had GDM are also considered. Our suggestions are only applicable in a pandemic scenario, and usual guidelines and care pathways should be re-implemented as soon as possible and appropriate.


Subject(s)
Diabetes, Gestational/diagnosis , Endocrinology/methods , Obstetrics/methods , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Prenatal Care/methods , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Endocrinology/standards , Female , Humans , Obstetrics/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Pregnancy , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/prevention & control , Pregnancy Complications, Infectious/virology , Prenatal Care/standards , SARS-CoV-2
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