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1.
Med Sci Monit ; 28: e935474, 2022 Feb 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1771789

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND The emergence of SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2) and the sudden inflow of patients with severe COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) symptoms increased demand for hospital and pre-hospital care, the latter being provided by emergency medical teams. The Polish Medical Air Rescue Services include the Helicopter Emergency Medical Service (HEMS) and the airplane-based Emergency Medical Service (EMS). This study aimed to present the experience of the Polish Medical Air Rescue Service during the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic and measures taken to protect patients, medical staff, and air crew from SARS-CoV-2 infection. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted a retrospective analysis of missions completed by the Polish Medical Air Rescue crews with respect to confirmed SARS-CoV-2 cases. We analyzed data from the medical records of the Polish Medical Air Rescue Service, which included flights to accidents and emergencies, and air patient transport missions, where medical assistance was provided to patients with confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infection in the first year of the pandemic in Poland. RESULTS Among the COVID-19 patients, the most common comorbidity was acute respiratory failure (41.58%). Emergency missions more often concerned older patients with sudden cardiac arrest, dyspnea, upper respiratory tract infection, stroke, and acute coronary syndromes. CONCLUSIONS During the first year of the COVID-19 pandemic in Poland, the Polish Medical Air Rescue Service implemented procedures to protect patients, medical staff, and air crew from SARS-CoV-2 infection. This study highlights the importance of using single-patient isolation units for patient transport between hospitals and for emergency hospital admissions when the SARS-CoV-2 status of the patients were unknown.


Subject(s)
Air Ambulances , COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Staff , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Humans , Medical Records , Pandemics , Poland , Retrospective Studies , Transportation of Patients
3.
Rev. latinoam. enferm. (Online) ; 30: e3518, 2022. tab
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1760026

ABSTRACT

Resumo Objetivo avaliar a relação entre sintomas psicopatológicos e a situação laboral de profissionais de enfermagem da Região Sudeste do Brasil, no contexto da pandemia da COVID-19. Método estudo observacional e transversal com coleta de dados virtual e por meio de snowball nos meses de abril a julho de 2020. Aplicou-se um questionário contendo dados sociodemográficos, laborais e a escala de avaliação de sintomas psicopatológicos (psicoticismo, obsessividade/compulsividade, somatização e ansiedade). Foram utilizadas estatísticas descritivas e inferenciais para a análise dos dados. Resultados entre os 532 participantes, verificou-se relação entre carga horária de trabalho semanal e psicoticismo. Todos os domínios da escala associaram-se ao constrangimento e/ou violência no percurso de trabalho e recebimento de suporte psicológico/emocional da instituição onde o indivíduo trabalha/estuda. Conclusão a faixa etária, carga horária elevada, violência vivenciada e falta de suporte psicológico durante a pandemia associaram-se com o aumento dos sintomas psicopatológicos entre os profissionais de enfermagem. Sugere-se a criação de diretrizes institucionais voltadas ao acolhimento e acompanhamento dessas demandas.


Abstract Objective to evaluate the relationship between psychopathological symptoms and the work situation of nursing professionals in the Southeast Region, Brazil, in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. Method an observational and cross-sectional study with virtual and snowball data collection from April to July 2020. A questionnaire containing socio-demographic and labor data and the psychopathological symptoms assessment scale (psychoticism, obsessiveness/compulsivity, somatization, and anxiety) were applied. Descriptive and inferential statistics were used to analyze the data. Results among the 532 participants, there was a relationship between weekly workload and psychoticism. All domains of the scale were associated with embarrassment and/or violence in the course of work and receiving psychological/emotional support from the institution where the individual works/studies. Conclusion the age group, heavy workload, experienced violence and lack of psychological support during the pandemic were associated with increased psychopathological symptoms among nursing professionals. It is suggested the creation of institutional guidelines aimed at the reception and follow-up of these demands.


Resumen Objetivo evaluar la relación entre síntomas psicopatológicos y la situación laboral de profesionales de enfermería de la Región Sureste de Brasil, en el contexto de la pandemia de la COVID-19. Método estudio observacional y transversal con recolección de datos virtual y por medio de snowball en los meses de abril a julio de 2020. Se aplicó un cuestionario que contenía datos sociodemográficos, laborales y la escala de evaluación de síntomas psicopatológicos (psicoticismo, obsesión/compulsión, somatización y ansiedad). Fueron utilizadas estadísticas descriptivas y de inferencia para el análisis de los datos. Resultados entre los 532 participantes, se verificó una relación entre la carga horaria de trabajo semanal y el psicoticismo. Todos los dominios de la escala se asociaron con incomodidad y/o violencia, en el transcurso del trabajo y el recibimiento de soporte psicológico/emocional de la institución, en donde el individuo trabaja/estudia. Conclusión el intervalo etario, la carga horaria elevada, la violencia experimentada y la falta de soporte psicológico, durante la pandemia se asociaron con el aumento de los síntomas psicopatológicos entre los profesionales de enfermería. Se sugiere la creación de directrices institucionales dirigidas al acogimiento y acompañamiento de esas demandas.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Psychopathology , COVID-19 , Mental Disorders , Nurse Practitioners , Occupational Diseases
4.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 26(4): 1398-1402, 2022 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1732622

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Laparoscopic surgery has been suggested to pose a risk of infection to the surgical team due to aerosol and gas leakage during the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. However, there have been no studies on the risk of gas and aerosol leakage in laparoscopic surgery. We aimed to answer the question "Is the aerosol and gas leakage in laparoscopy is hazardous in terms of coronavirus infection?" with this study. MATERIALS AND METHODS: In this study, gas and aerosol leaks were documented by simulating the entry and exit maneuvers from a trocar during laparoscopic surgery using a high-speed camera, fog, and laser in a model representing the abdomen. RESULTS: The maximum gas and aerosol leakage were found during wet gauze extraction from the 10 mm trocar, and its velocity reached 7.5 m/s. The fastest aerosol leakage rate was observed when a 5 mm grasper was extracted from the 5 mm trocar. The results of the subsequent trials were consistent with these values. CONCLUSIONS: Higher leakage speeds were observed than the velocity of the exhaled air in a resting person. The surgical crew members, who work very close to the trocars and each other, are at serious risk of infection with COVID-19 which can spread as fast as exhalation speed through trocars. Since there is an evident risk of infection for the surgical crew from laparoscopic surgery of a patient whose intraabdominal fluids are infected with COVID-19, patients must be evaluated elaborately for COVID-19 preoperatively and infected patients should undergo surgery conventionally.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Laparoscopy , Aerosols , Humans , In Vitro Techniques , Infection Control , Lasers , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Exposure , Personnel, Hospital
5.
Ann Intern Med ; 174(5): 649-654, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1726736

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Identifying occupational risk factors for severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among health care workers (HCWs) can improve HCW and patient safety. OBJECTIVE: To quantify demographic, occupational, and community risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among HCWs in a large health care system. DESIGN: A logistic regression model was fitted to data from a cross-sectional survey conducted in April to June 2020, linking risk factors for occupational and community exposure to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. SETTING: A large academic health care system in the Atlanta, Georgia, metropolitan area. PARTICIPANTS: Employees and medical staff members elected to participate in SARS-CoV-2 serology testing offered to all HCWs as part of a quality initiative and completed a survey on exposure to COVID-19 and use of personal protective equipment. MEASUREMENTS: Demographic risk factors for COVID-19, residential ZIP code incidence of COVID-19, occupational exposure to HCWs or patients who tested positive on polymerase chain reaction test, and use of personal protective equipment as potential risk factors for infection. The outcome was SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. RESULTS: Adjusted SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity was estimated to be 3.8% (95% CI, 3.4% to 4.3%) (positive, n = 582) among the 10 275 HCWs (35% of the Emory Healthcare workforce) who participated in the survey. Community contact with a person known or suspected to have COVID-19 (adjusted odds ratio [aOR], 1.9 [CI, 1.4 to 2.6]; 77 positive persons [10.3%]) and community COVID-19 incidence (aOR, 1.5 [CI, 1.0 to 2.2]) increased the odds of infection. Black individuals were at high risk (aOR, 2.1 [CI, 1.7 to 2.6]; 238 positive persons [8.3%]). LIMITATIONS: Participation rates were modest and key workplace exposures, including job and infection prevention practices, changed rapidly in the early phases of the pandemic. CONCLUSION: Demographic and community risk factors, including contact with a COVID-19-positive person and Black race, are more strongly associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity among HCWs than is exposure in the workplace. PRIMARY FUNDING SOURCE: Emory COVID-19 Response Collaborative.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/ethnology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Georgia/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/ethnology , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/ethnology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
6.
Work ; 71(2): 319-326, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1674299

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Many individuals continued to work from home even after nearly 9 months since the COVID-19 pandemic started in spring of 2020. OBJECTIVE: To conduct a follow-up survey of the faculty and staff of a large Midwest university to determine whether there had been any changes to their home work environment and health outcomes since a prior survey conducted at the start of the pandemic in spring of 2020. METHODS: An electronic survey was sent out to all employees, staff, and administration (approximately 10,350 individuals) and was completed by 1,135 individuals. RESULTS: It was found that not much had changed after nearly 9 months of working at home. Faculty and staff continued to primarily use laptops without an external keyboard, monitor or mouse. Few participants reported using chairs with adjustable armrests. These conditions continued to result in high levels of body discomfort (49% neck and head, 45% low back, and 62% upper back and shoulders having moderate to severe pain). CONCLUSION: If workers are going to continue to work from home, companies will need to accommodate them with more than a laptop, and should include an external keyboard, monitor, and mouse.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Ergonomics , Humans , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
8.
Work ; 71(2): 309-318, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662551

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The recent mandate for university faculty and staff to work-from-home (WFH) during the COVID-19 pandemic has forced employees to work with sub-optimal ergonomic workstations that may change their musculoskeletal discomfort and pain. As women report more work-related musculoskeletal discomfort (WMSD), this effect may be exacerbated in women. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to describe university employee at-home office workstations, and explore if at-home workstation design mediates the effect of gender on musculoskeletal pain. METHODS: University employees completed a survey that focused on the WFH environment, at home workstation design and musculoskeletal pain. Descriptive statistics and regression analysis were used to analyze the responses. RESULTS: 61% of respondents reported an increase in musculoskeletal pain, with the neck, shoulders and lower back being reported most frequently. Women reported significantly greater musculoskeletal pain, but this relationship was significantly mediated by poor ergonomic design of the home workstation. Improper seat-height and monitor distance were statistically associated with total-body WMSD. CONCLUSIONS: WFH has worsened employee musculoskeletal health and the ergonomic gap between women and men in the workspace has persisted in the WFH environment, with seat height and monitor distance being identified as significant predictors of discomfort/pain.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Musculoskeletal Pain , Occupational Diseases , Ergonomics , Female , Humans , Male , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/prevention & control , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Pain/etiology , Musculoskeletal Pain/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Work ; 71(2): 395-405, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1662549

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The imposition of telework by the COVID-19 pandemic represented a challenge for companies and workers with regard to the management and organization of the workplace at home. OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the ergonomic risks, psychosocial factors and musculoskeletal symptoms as well as the relationships between these variables in employees of a Brazilian labor judiciary unit. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 55 employees who had their workstations evaluated by means of the Rapid Office Strain Assessment (ROSA-Br) and answered a questionnaire of sociodemographic and occupational characterization, the dimensions of workstation and posture of the Maastricht Upper Extremity Questionnaire (MUEQ-Br-revised), the short version of the Job Stress Scale and the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire (NMQ). RESULTS: The workstations evaluations by ROSA-Br and MUEQ-Br-revised showed a strong correlation between themselves and to body posture, but they were not related to the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms. Body posture and demands were correlated to each other and with to occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms. Shoulders, neck and wrists / hands were the most affected body regions. CONCLUSIONS: Companies that adopt teleworking for their employees must be aware of working conditions at home, including the workload, and offer adequate support in order to prevent the occurrence of musculoskeletal problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ergonomics , Humans , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Justice , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teleworking
10.
Work ; 71(1): 65-78, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1638137

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has increased some psychosocial risks which may aggravate the development of musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and reduced psychological well-being, two leading global occupational health problems. OBJECTIVE: This study aims to investigate whether an employee's psychological well-being mediates the relationship between the psychosocial factors (job strain, work-life balance, and job security) and the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain in the Indonesian general working population during the pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was employed using an online questionnaire. A total of 406 from 465 respondents were included in the final analysis. RESULTS: It was found that 73.9% of respondents suffered from upper body part pain, 25.15% from low back pain, and 39.7% reported pain in the lower limb. Process Macro Model 4 analysis showed the significant role of well-being as a mediator in the association between work-life balance and the odds of experiencing the upper body and low back pains. However, neither the direct nor mediating effect on the relationship between job strain or job security and any musculoskeletal pains were observed. These findings suggest that specific psychosocial factors may be more relevant to be investigated in the particular context. CONCLUSION: The use of a mediation model was able to link work-life balance to musculoskeletal complaints through well-being states in the context of the pandemic. Organizations need to mitigate poor well-being triggered by psychosocial stressors which could affect physical complaints to maintain employee's health and productivity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Musculoskeletal Pain , Occupational Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Musculoskeletal Diseases/complications , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Pain/etiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Arh Hig Rada Toksikol ; 72(4): 289-297, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608845

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can be diagnosed as occupational disease by an occupational health physician (OHP), if supported by relevant work-related and medical documentation. The aim of this study was to analyse such documentation submitted by Croatian healthcare workers (HCWs) and discuss its relevance in view of European and Croatian guidelines. The study included 100 Croatian HCWs who were SARS-CoV-2-positive and requested that their infection be diagnosed as occupational disease by their OHPs from 1 May 2020 to 10 March 2021. As participants they were asked to fill out our online Occupational COVID-19 in Healthcare Workers Questionnaire. For the purpose of this study we analysed answers about the type of close contact at the workplace, COVID-19 symptoms, and enclosed work-related (job description, employer statement about exposure to SARS-CoV-2) and medical documentation (positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction test and patient history confirming the diagnosis of COVID-19). Most participants were working in hospitals (N=95), mostly nurses (N=75), who became infected by a patient (N=68) or colleague (N=31), and had at least one COVID-19 symptom (N=87). Eighty participants did not enclose obligatory documents, 41 of whom failed to submit job description and 31 both job description and employer statement. These findings confirm that the major risk of occupational COVID-19 in HCWs is close contact with patients and colleagues, and points out the need for better cooperation between OHPs, occupational safety experts, employers, and diseased workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Health , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
12.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(12): e944-e948, 2021 12 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595826

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We evaluated the relationship between telecommuting environment and low back pain (LBP) among desk-based workers in Japan. METHODS: This cross-sectional study included 3663 desk-based, telecommuting workers. LBP was assessed using a 0 to 10 numerical rating scale. The telecommuting environment was evaluated using subjective questions. Mixed-effects logistic regression analysis was used to evaluate this association. RESULTS: The results of mixed-effects logistic model revealed that not having a place or room to concentrate on work, desk not well-lit enough for work, lack of space on the desk to work, not having enough legroom, and uncomfortable temperature and humidity conditions in the workspace were significantly associated with higher odds of LBP. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that telecommuting environment is associated with the prevalence of LBP.


Subject(s)
Low Back Pain , Occupational Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Low Back Pain/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Prevalence , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Teleworking
13.
Arch Prev Riesgos Labor ; 24(3): 304-309, 2021 07 14.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599718

ABSTRACT

En la notificación nº 366 "Enfermedad de Coronavirus" publicada por el Ministerio de Sanidad en fecha 03/05/2021, con los datos individualizados notificados por las CCAA a la Red Nacional de Vigilancia Epidemiológica (al sistema SiViEs), se indica que están notificados en España 3 540 430 casos de COVID-19 de los cuales 78 293 son fallecidos. Del total de casos notificados, corresponden al personal sanitario y sociosanitario unos 80 065 (2.26%) casos de COVID-19 notificados con diagnóstico posterior al 10 de mayo de 2020, siendo significativamente mayor el porcentaje entre las mujeres (77.95% o 62 416 casos) que entre los hombres (21.95% o 17 582 casos). Además, a la cifra de 80.065 casos se deben sumar un total de 35.548 casos declarados desde el inicio de la pandemia hasta el 7/05/2020(3), obteniendo una cifra total de 115 613 casos notificados de COVID-19 en personal sanitario.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Health Personnel , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
14.
CMAJ ; 193(49): E1868-E1877, 2021 12 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591952

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has disproportionately affected health care workers. We sought to estimate SARS-CoV-2 seroprevalence among hospital health care workers in Quebec, Canada, after the first wave of the pandemic and to explore factors associated with SARS-CoV-2 seropositivity. METHODS: Between July 6 and Sept. 24, 2020, we enrolled health care workers from 10 hospitals, including 8 from a region with a high incidence of COVID-19 (the Montréal area) and 2 from low-incidence regions of Quebec. Eligible health care workers were physicians, nurses, orderlies and cleaning staff working in 4 types of care units (emergency department, intensive care unit, COVID-19 inpatient unit and non-COVID-19 inpatient unit). Participants completed a questionnaire and underwent SARS-CoV-2 serology testing. We identified factors independently associated with higher seroprevalence. RESULTS: Among 2056 enrolled health care workers, 241 (11.7%) had positive SARS-CoV-2 serology. Of these, 171 (71.0%) had been previously diagnosed with COVID-19. Seroprevalence varied among hospitals, from 2.4% to 3.7% in low-incidence regions to 17.9% to 32.0% in hospitals with outbreaks involving 5 or more health care workers. Higher seroprevalence was associated with working in a hospital where outbreaks occurred (adjusted prevalence ratio 4.16, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.63-6.57), being a nurse or nursing assistant (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.34, 95% CI 1.03-1.74) or an orderly (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.49, 95% CI 1.12-1.97), and Black or Hispanic ethnicity (adjusted prevalence ratio 1.41, 95% CI 1.13-1.76). Lower seroprevalence was associated with working in the intensive care unit (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.47, 95% CI 0.30-0.71) or the emergency department (adjusted prevalence ratio 0.61, 95% CI 0.39-0.98). INTERPRETATION: Health care workers in Quebec hospitals were at high risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection, particularly in outbreak settings. More work is needed to better understand SARS-CoV-2 transmission dynamics in health care settings.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/blood , COVID-19/etiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Demography , Health Personnel , Hospitals , Humans , Incidence , Occupational Diseases/blood , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Quebec/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1593-1596, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572710

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 outbreak has resulted in a substantial morbidity and mortality, and has put the health system under tremendous stress. A need for devising and adopting newer methods and techniques is being emphasized in the healthcare facilities to combat the effects of the SARS-CoV-2. Besides patient care, focus needs to be laid on the effective and dignified management of the deceased and medico-legal services provided by the hospitals and medical institutions during the COVID-19 pandemic. Considering the likelihood of forensic experts and autopsy personnel being exposed to SARS-CoV-2 inadvertently during the autopsy, it is recommended to resort to safer and minimally invasive techniques of postmortem examination of the dead. In this regard, employing radiological techniques for postmortem examination appears to be a promising option during the COVID-19 pandemic. An inherent advantage of postmortem radiography over conventional autopsies is the minimization of the risk of transmission of infection to the health care workers. Our correspondence highlights on the possibility of using radiological facilities as an effective replacement of high-risk conventional autopsy procedures during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Autopsy , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Facilities , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Radiology , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , India/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Regional Health Planning
17.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1640-1645, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572709

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: To analyze the virus spread among Sassari Hospital staff in the first Covid-19 wave and the impact of the Swab Team, a multidisciplinary task force entitled of nasopharyngeal swab collection and testing. METHODOLOGY: Nasopharyngeal swabs from HCWs between March 6 and May 28 2020 are evaluated. RESULTS: 4919 SARS-CoV-2 tests were performed on 3521 operators. Nurses and doctors are the categories at highest risk. After the Swab Team institution, the average number of swabs raised from 47/day to 86/day (p = 0.007). Positive samples decreased from 18.6% to 1.7% (p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS: The Swab Team is effective in increasing the cases tested and in reducing the reporting time. Procedure standardization reduces the risk for all the subjects involved (no transmission among swab team members, nor during the sample collection).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Medical Staff, Hospital , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Patient Care Team , SARS-CoV-2 , Specimen Handling , Adult , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies
18.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1615-1617, 2021 Nov 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572706

ABSTRACT

The impacts of COVID -19 pandemic have been quite significant on healthcare providers. I was particularly challenging for those in Low and Middle-Income Countries including Sudan . Unfortunately, the pandemic has hit Sudan on extremely difficult time for the country and its people. The country was coming out of long-brutal and devastating dictatorship and transitioning to new democracy with civilian leadership. In addition to the pandemic related issues, trying to rebuild the health system during socioeconomic crisis, healthcare providers  in the country were challenged personally and professionally. These challenges include the stress of working in under-resourced settings with limited access to personal-protection equipment and testing kits raised the fear of contracting the virus and spreading it to their families. The professional, social, and personal life of healthcare providers have been dramatically changed by the ongoing pandemic, however, they are heroically accepting this change in a hope that, this will save the life of many more people. Nevertheless, their fights and sacrifices should at least be rewarded by governments and communities altogether strictly enforce the implementation of other preventive measures including vaccination, face masking, and social distancing and get all protected. We should all understand that, unless we are all protected no one is protected, so all must adapt to the new norm of life and collaborate not only on ending this pandemic but to prevent similar ones in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Sudan/epidemiology , Vaccination
19.
J Infect Dev Ctries ; 15(11): 1603-1606, 2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572701

ABSTRACT

During phase 2 of the COVID-19 pandemic in a Mexican City, informal street vendors (cases) and formal employees (controls) were interviewed. A total of 82.6% of street vendors preferred to expose themselves to the coronavirus than to stop working, compared with 18.4% of formal employees (adjusted OR = 19.4, 95%CI: 4.6-81.7, p < 0.001). Street vendors had 7 times less fear of dying from coronavirus (adjusted OR = 0.14, 95% CI: 0.03-0.5, p = 0.005) and showed a 16-times greater lack of real concern for the increase in cases in their community than the formal employees (adjusted OR = 0.06, 95% CI: 0.01-0.3, p = 0.002). Street vendors were the group with the poorest adherence to household and work area containment measures that continued to be in contact with others. The corresponding authorities must plan specific strategies that allow street vendors to survive economically, while at the same time, protecting community health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Behavior , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Workplace , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Interviews as Topic , Male , Mexico/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Poverty
20.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(23)2021 11 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1561746

ABSTRACT

(1) Background: Neglected occupational health and safety aspects in batik industries cause their workers to have an increased risk of lead exposure. The effect of occupational lead exposure on neurocognitive performance is inconclusive. Therefore, we conducted an observational study to examine the difference in simple reaction time between lead-exposed batik workers and non-exposed referents. (2) Methods: This cross-sectional study was conducted in seven batik enterprises in Lendah District, Indonesia, excluding workers with medical conditions impairing reaction time. Simple reaction time tests were conducted using an online tool. Two-way model ANCOVAs examined interactions between gender and job types on the mean differences in reaction time. (3) Results: After controlling for age and body mass index, we observed longer reaction times among lead-exposed batik workers than non-exposed referents with an adjusted mean difference of 0.19 (95% CI: 0.016-0.368) seconds. A more prominent detrimental effect of lead exposure on reaction time among female workers than among male workers was observed. (4) Conclusions: Our results suggest that occupational lead exposure could contribute to longer reaction time, notably among female workers. Thus, occupational health and safety precautions are vital to protect batik workers and preserve their important contributions to cultural heritage.


Subject(s)
Lead/toxicity , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Exposure , Occupational Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Reaction Time
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