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1.
Arh Hig Rada Toksikol ; 72(4): 289-297, 2021 Dec 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1608845

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) can be diagnosed as occupational disease by an occupational health physician (OHP), if supported by relevant work-related and medical documentation. The aim of this study was to analyse such documentation submitted by Croatian healthcare workers (HCWs) and discuss its relevance in view of European and Croatian guidelines. The study included 100 Croatian HCWs who were SARS-CoV-2-positive and requested that their infection be diagnosed as occupational disease by their OHPs from 1 May 2020 to 10 March 2021. As participants they were asked to fill out our online Occupational COVID-19 in Healthcare Workers Questionnaire. For the purpose of this study we analysed answers about the type of close contact at the workplace, COVID-19 symptoms, and enclosed work-related (job description, employer statement about exposure to SARS-CoV-2) and medical documentation (positive SARS-CoV-2 polymerase chain reaction test and patient history confirming the diagnosis of COVID-19). Most participants were working in hospitals (N=95), mostly nurses (N=75), who became infected by a patient (N=68) or colleague (N=31), and had at least one COVID-19 symptom (N=87). Eighty participants did not enclose obligatory documents, 41 of whom failed to submit job description and 31 both job description and employer statement. These findings confirm that the major risk of occupational COVID-19 in HCWs is close contact with patients and colleagues, and points out the need for better cooperation between OHPs, occupational safety experts, employers, and diseased workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Health , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 225-231, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401810

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The crisis situation generated by COVID-19 and the measures adopted have generated social changes in the normal dynamics of the general population and especially for health workers, who find themselves caring for patients with suspected or confirmed infection. Recent studies have detected in them depression and anxiety symptoms and burnout syndrome, with personal and social conditions impacting their response capacity during the health emergency. Our aim was to generate recommendations for the promotion and protection of the mental health of health workers and teams in the first line of care in the health emergency due to COVID-19. METHODS: A rapid literature search was carried out in PubMed and Google Scholar, and an iterative expert consensus and through electronic consultation, with 13 participants from the areas of psychology, psychiatry and medicine; the grading of its strength and directionality was carried out according to the international standards of the Joanna Briggs Institute. RESULTS: Thirty-one recommendations were generated on self-care of health workers, community care among health teams, screening for alarm signs in mental health and for health institutions. CONCLUSIONS: The promotion and protection activities in mental health to face the health emergency generated by COVID-19 worldwide can include coordinated actions between workers, health teams and health institutions as part of a comprehensive, community care, co-responsible and sustained over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Health Services/methods , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/standards , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/standards , Self Care/methods , Self Care/standards
6.
Internist (Berl) ; 62(9): 906-920, 2021 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355997

ABSTRACT

The attributable proportion of occupation-related influences on airway and lung diseases is 10-30%. In patients with obstructive airway diseases it is extremely important to sufficiently document findings during the period of activities burdening the airway as compared to periods off work. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can have a work-related (partial) cause even in smokers. Regarding occupational infectious diseases, the main cause up to 2019 was tuberculosis but the corona pandemic has led to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) being the most frequent occupational disease. For the occupational medical assessment of interstitial and malignant pulmonary diseases, checklists can be helpful to support the medical history.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Lung , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
7.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 166-175, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1347800

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Since the emergence of the novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19), the world has faced a pandemic with consequences at all levels. In many countries, the health systems collapsed and healthcare professionals had to be on the front line of this crisis. The adverse effects on the mental health of healthcare professionals have been widely reported. This research focuses on identifying the main factors associated with adverse psychological outcomes. METHODS: Descriptive, cross-sectional study based on surveys, applying the PHQ-9, GAD-7, ISI and EIE-R tests to healthcare professionals from Ecuador during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: 1028 participants, distributed in: 557 physicians (54.18%), 349 nurses (33.94%), 29 laboratory workers (2.82%), 27 paramedics (2.62%), 52 psychologists (5.05%) and 14 respiratory therapists (1.36%), from 16 of the 24 provinces of Ecuador. Of these, 27.3% presented symptoms of depression, 39.2% anxiety symptoms, 16.3% insomnia and 43.8% symptoms of PTSD, with the 4 types of symptoms ranging from moderate to severe. The most relevant associated factors were: working in Guayas (the most affected province) (OR = 2.18 for depressive symptoms and OR = 2.59 for PTSD symptoms); being a postgraduate doctor (OR = 1.52 for depressive symptoms and OR = 1.57 for insomnia), perception of not having the proper protective equipment (OR = 1.71 for symptoms of depression and OR = 1.57 for symptoms of anxiety) and being a woman (OR = 1.39 for anxiety). CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare professionals can suffer a significant mental condition that may require psychiatric and psychological intervention. The main associated factors are primarily related to living and working in cities with a higher number of cases and the characteristics of the job, such as being a postgraduate doctor, as well as the perception of security. The main risk factors are primarily related to geographical distribution and job characteristics, such as being a resident physician and self-perception of safety. Further studies are required as the pandemic evolves.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ecuador/epidemiology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Psychological Tests , Risk Factors , Young Adult
8.
Indian J Gastroenterol ; 40(4): 410-419, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338283

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: During Corona Virus Disease-19 (COVID-19) pandemic, it has been estimated that approximately 10% of health care professionals (HCPs) have been diagnosed contacting  COVID-19. Aerosol-generating procedures have led to change in safety practices among HCPs. We thus evaluated the efficacy of the endoscopic safety measures among HCPs posted in the endoscopy unit. METHODS: In this retrospective analysis, all endoscopic procedures performed over a period of 4 months, from 1 April to 31 July 2020 were included. We noted indications and number of COVID-positive procedures as well as comprehensive screening of HCPs posted in our endoscopy unit. The aim of the study was to evaluate the incidence and outcome of COVID-19 among HCPs. RESULTS: Three thousand four hundred and sixty procedures were included in the analysis. Indications were divided as urgent (n = 190, 5.49%), semi-urgent (n = 553, 16%) and non-urgent group (n = 2717, 78.52%). Thirty-four procedures (0.98%) were done on diagnosed COVID-19 patients. The most common indications were gastrointestinal bleed (n = 12/34, 35.30%) followed by biliary sepsis (n = 9/34, 26.5%). Among the HCPs, the incidence of symptomatic COVID-19 was 6.58% (n = 5/76). All HCPs recovered with excellent outcomes. A comprehensive screening showed 7.90% (n = 6/76) HCPs having Immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibody in their sera. CONCLUSION: Addition of safety measures in endoscopy leads to low risk of transmission among HCPs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Endoscopy/methods , Health Personnel , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Incidence , India , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/standards , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Health/standards , Personal Protective Equipment , Retrospective Studies , Tertiary Care Centers , Young Adult
9.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): 625-629, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1304016

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between surgeon gender and stress during the Covid-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Although female surgeons face difficulties integrating work and home in the best of times, the Covid-19 pandemic has presented new challenges. The implications for the female surgical workforce are unknown. METHODS: This cross-sectional, multi-center telephone survey study of surgeons was conducted across 5 academic institutions (May 15-June 5, 2020). The primary outcome was maximum stress level, measured using the validated Stress Numerical Rating Scale-11. Mixed-effects generalized linear models were used to estimate the relationship between surgeon stress level and gender. RESULTS: Of 529 surgeons contacted, 337 surgeons responded and 335 surveys were complete (response rate 63.7%). The majority of female respondents were housestaff (58.1%), and the majority of male respondents were faculty (56.8%) (P = 0.008). A greater proportion of male surgeons (50.3%) than female surgeons (36.8%) had children ≤18 years (P = 0.015). The mean maximum stress level for female surgeons was 7.51 (SD 1.49) and for male surgeons was 6.71 (SD 2.15) (P < 0.001). After adjusting for the presence of children and training status, female gender was associated with a significantly higher maximum stress level (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings that women experienced more stress than men during the Covid-19 pandemic, regardless of parental status, suggest that there is more to the gendered differences in the stress experience of the pandemic than the added demands of childcare. Deliberate interventions are needed to promote and support the female surgical workforce during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Physicians, Women/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
11.
Clin Chest Med ; 41(4): 605-621, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-896784

ABSTRACT

Computer and information systems can improve occupational respiratory disease prevention and surveillance by providing efficient resources for patients, workers, clinicians, and public health practitioners. Advances include interlinking electronic health records, autocoding surveillance data, clinical decision support systems, and social media applications for acquiring and disseminating information. Obstacles to advances include inflexible hierarchical coding schemes, inadequate occupational health electronic health record systems, and inadequate public focus on occupational respiratory disease. Potentially transformative approaches include machine learning, natural language processing, and improved ontologies.


Subject(s)
Informatics/methods , Lung Diseases/diagnosis , Lung Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Humans , Machine Learning
13.
Semin Speech Lang ; 42(1): 73-84, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1087530

ABSTRACT

Many speech-language pathologists (SLPs) recently adopted a live, synchronous online distribution of clinical services due to physical distancing measures aimed at bringing the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) outbreak under control. Few SLPs had received training in telepractice to prepare them for changes from an in-person service delivery model to synchronous telepractice. The new telepractice environment may alter vocal behaviors and communication interactions in such a way that negatively impacts voice production. Thus, delivering synchronous online clinical services may require that SLPs adopt novel prevention strategies for avoiding phonogenic voice problems. Guided by two complementary injury frameworks, the Haddon Matrix and the Haddon Countermeasures, this article provides an overview of potential factors associated with phonogenic voice problems among SLPs in telepractice and proposes possible prevention strategies to maintain optimal vocal health and function with synchronous modes of online clinical practice.


Subject(s)
Communication , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Speech Sound Disorder/diagnosis , Speech Sound Disorder/prevention & control , Speech-Language Pathology , Telerehabilitation , COVID-19/complications , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention , Risk Factors , Voice Quality
14.
Aten Primaria ; 53(3): 101956, 2021 03.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1085589

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the sociodemographic, clinical and epidemiological characteristics associated with the presence of infection by the SARS-CoV-2 virus in family physicians who carry out their work in Primary Care (PC) or in Hospital Emergencies. DESING: Observational analytical case-control study. SITE: Primary care. PARTICIPANTS: 969 Primare Care Physicians, Hospital Emergency physicians and other extrahospitalry centers that had PCR for the detection of the SARS-CoV-2. Of these, 133 participated as cases (PCR positive) and 836 as controls (PCR negative). INTERVENTIONS: No. MAIN MEASUREMENTS: Sociodemographic and work, contact with a COVID-19 patient, symptoms present during the process, first manifested symptom, previous chronic pathologies, and tobacco use. RESULTS: 13.7% (95% CI: 11.6-16.0) were cases infected with SARS-CoV-2. The most frequently declared symptoms by those infected were a feeling of fatigue/tiredness (69.2%; 95% CI: 60.9-77.4%), cough (56.4%; 95% CI: 47.6-65.2%) and headache (55.6%; 95% CI: 46.8-64.4%).Using logistic regression, the variables independently associated with SARS-CoV-2 virus infection in Family Physicians were: previous contact with a COVID-19 patient (OR: 2.3; 95% CI: 1.2-4.2), present fatigue / tiredness (OR: 2.2; 95% CI: 1.2-3.9), smell alteration (4.6; 95% CI: 1.7-12.5), taste alteration (OR: 32.0; 95% CI: 9.6-106.8), cough (OR: 3.0; 95% CI: 1.7-5.3) and fever (OR: 6.1; 95% CI: 3.2-11.4). CONCLUSIONS: Symptoms independently related to SARS-CoV-2 virus infection in Family Physicians were fatigue, fever, cough, and altered taste and smell. The presence of these symptoms could facilitate the diagnosis of suspected COVID-19 disease and the earlier selection of those that require confirmatory tests.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Physicians, Family , Primary Health Care , Adult , COVID-19/etiology , COVID-19 Testing , Case-Control Studies , Female , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Spain/epidemiology
15.
Am J Ind Med ; 64(4): 227-237, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046876

ABSTRACT

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 permeates all aspects of society worldwide. Initial medical reports and media coverage have increased awareness of the risk imposed on healthcare workers in particular, during this pandemic. However, the health implications of COVID-19 for the global workforce are multifaceted and complex, warranting careful reflection and consideration to mitigate the adverse effects on workers worldwide. Accordingly, our review offers a framework for considering this topic, highlighting key issues, with the aim to prompt and inform action, including research, to minimize the occupational hazards imposed by this ongoing challenge. We address respiratory disease as a primary concern, while recognizing the multisystem spectrum of COVID-19-related disease and how clinical aspects are interwoven with broader socioeconomic forces.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Occupational Diseases , Pandemics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Global Health/economics , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/economics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Public Health Surveillance
16.
Ann Surg ; 273(4): 625-629, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045792

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the relationship between surgeon gender and stress during the Covid-19 pandemic. BACKGROUND: Although female surgeons face difficulties integrating work and home in the best of times, the Covid-19 pandemic has presented new challenges. The implications for the female surgical workforce are unknown. METHODS: This cross-sectional, multi-center telephone survey study of surgeons was conducted across 5 academic institutions (May 15-June 5, 2020). The primary outcome was maximum stress level, measured using the validated Stress Numerical Rating Scale-11. Mixed-effects generalized linear models were used to estimate the relationship between surgeon stress level and gender. RESULTS: Of 529 surgeons contacted, 337 surgeons responded and 335 surveys were complete (response rate 63.7%). The majority of female respondents were housestaff (58.1%), and the majority of male respondents were faculty (56.8%) (P = 0.008). A greater proportion of male surgeons (50.3%) than female surgeons (36.8%) had children ≤18 years (P = 0.015). The mean maximum stress level for female surgeons was 7.51 (SD 1.49) and for male surgeons was 6.71 (SD 2.15) (P < 0.001). After adjusting for the presence of children and training status, female gender was associated with a significantly higher maximum stress level (P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Our findings that women experienced more stress than men during the Covid-19 pandemic, regardless of parental status, suggest that there is more to the gendered differences in the stress experience of the pandemic than the added demands of childcare. Deliberate interventions are needed to promote and support the female surgical workforce during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Physicians, Women/psychology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Linear Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , United States/epidemiology
18.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(12): 981-985, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-998535

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The number of COVID-19 cases in Arizona is rapidly increasing, leading the country in the rate of new daily cases. Exposure among first responders remains unknown. METHODS: Rates of SARS-CoV-2 IgG among first responders in Arizona were determined, and attitudes/views about the impact of COVID-19 on their work life was analyzed. RESULTS: Of 3326 first responders, 50 (1.50%) tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 IgG. Most first responders thought antibody testing would help ease their anxieties (62.5%) and be beneficial to their work-life (60.6%). CONCLUSION: The rate of COVID-19 exposure among first responders in Arizona is low-1.50%. COVID-19 is a concern among many of the first responders, and antibody testing was beneficial in easing their anxieties about going to work and performing work-related duties.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Emergency Responders , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Arizona/epidemiology , Attitude to Health , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Testing , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/analysis , Young Adult
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