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1.
Otolaryngol Pol ; 76(2): 34-41, 2021 Dec 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20245468

ABSTRACT

<b> Aim:</b> The aim of the study was to analyze the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the related change of the teaching mode from stationary to distance learning on the severity of voice-related ailments among teachers. </br></br> <b> Materials and methods:</b> A questionnaire survey of teachers was conducted to assess voice disorders during stationary and remote work using the Vocal Tract Discomfort (VTDs) scale and Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), and the respondents' subjective feelings were assessed. Demographic and environmental factors associated with voice work were examined. Data on sickness absence, which were obtained from the "Health Needs Maps 2020" Ministry of Health's, were also analyzed. Responses were subjected to statistical analysis. A P-value level below 0.05 was considered statistically significant. </br></br> <b>Results:</b> 128 teachers participated in the survey. The overall assessment of voice disorders using VTDs and NRS scales showed no statistically significant differences for complaints between stationary and remote work. Detailed analysis revealed more se-vere voice disorders in teachers working more than 6 months remotely (P = 0.049) and having more than 20 lessons per week (P = 0.012). Subjective assessment confirmed a significantly lower percentage of teachers reporting voice disorders when wor-king remotely compared to stationary (P = 0.043). This resulted in less sickness absence and a 40% decrease in sick leave related to voice disorders in 2020 compared to 2019. </br></br> <b>Conclusions:</b> During the remote learning period of the COVID-19 pandemic, teachers reported lower severity of voice disor-ders and this influenced the reduction of sickness absences. There were no statistically significant differences in voice complaints as assessed by VTDs and NRS scales for both teaching modes. Several factors affecting the severity of vocal tract disorders were identified - the number of class hours per week (>20) for stationary teaching and a long period of remote teaching (>6 months).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Voice Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Voice Disorders/diagnosis , Voice Disorders/epidemiology , Voice Quality
2.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 72(12): 2463-2467, 2022 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20239239

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the frequency and risk factors of musculoskeletal disorders in high-risk occupation workers in an urban setting. METHODS: The analytical cross-sectional study was conducted in Karachi from July to December 2020, and comprised office workers, operation theatre technicians and coolies. The presence of musculoskeletal disorders was assessed using the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire to determine factors associated with moderate to severe condition. Data was analysed using SPSS 20. RESULTS: Of the 300 male subjects, 100(33.3%) each were office workers, operation theatre technicians and coolies. The overall mean age was 33.25±6.8 years (range: 18-50 years). The overall prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was 179(59.7%). Besides, 117(65.4%) patients with musculoskeletal disorders had intermediate stage of the disease. The lower back and neck were the most common site of trouble involved in preceding 12 months 111(43.6%) each. CONCLUSIONS: Prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders was found to be a common problem affecting high-risk occupational workers.


Subject(s)
Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Male , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/complications , Risk Factors , Occupations , Surveys and Questionnaires , Prevalence
3.
Semin Respir Crit Care Med ; 44(3): 317-326, 2023 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2293574

ABSTRACT

Lung diseases caused by workplace exposure are too often mis- or underdiagnosed due in part to nonexistent or inadequate health surveillance programs for workers. Many of these diseases are indistinguishable from those that occur in the general population and are not recognized as being caused at least in part by occupational exposures. More than 10% of all lung diseases are estimated to result from workplace exposures. This study reviews recent estimates of the burden of the most important occupational lung diseases using data published by United Nations specialized agencies as well as the Global Burden of Disease studies. We focus on occupational chronic respiratory disease of which chronic obstructive lung disease and asthma are the most significant. Among occupational cancers, lung cancer is the most common, and is associated with more than 10 important workplace carcinogens. Classic occupational interstitial lung diseases such as asbestosis, silicosis, and coal workers' pneumoconiosis still comprise a substantial burden of disease in modern industrial societies, while other occupational causes of pulmonary fibrosis and granulomatous inflammation are frequently misclassified as idiopathic. Occupational respiratory infections gained prominence during the severe acute respiratory syndrome-coronavirus-2 (SARS-CoV-2) pandemic, eclipsing influenza and tuberculosis and other less common workplace infectious agents. The most significant risks are workplace exposures to particulate matter, gases, and fumes as well as occupational carcinogens and asthmagens. We present data on the burden of disease measured by deaths attributable to occupational respiratory disease as well as disability-adjusted years of life lost. Where available, prevalence and incidence data are also presented. These diseases are unique in that they are theoretically 100% preventable if appropriate exposure controls and workplace medical surveillance are implemented. This remains a continuing challenge globally and requires steadfast commitment on the part of government, industry, organized labor, and the medical profession.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Lung Diseases, Interstitial , Lung Neoplasms , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Exposure , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Lung Diseases, Interstitial/epidemiology , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Lung Neoplasms/epidemiology , Lung Neoplasms/etiology , Carcinogens
4.
Med Sci Monit ; 29: e939901, 2023 Apr 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2291681

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND This study aimed to evaluate whether the incidence rate of musculoskeletal system disorders changed owing to the increase in the time spent on the computer by academics who did or did not provide distance education during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIAL AND METHODS The Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire was used to assess musculoskeletal discomfort experienced in the past 1 week. In addition, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) Computer Workstations Evaluation Checklist was used to assess the ergonomic structure of the work environment. The questionnaire assessed musculoskeletal system disorders and collected demographic characteristics. RESULTS The study group included 184 (101 male, 83 female) academics who provided distance education, whereas the control group included 82 (44 male, 38 female) academics who did not provide distance education. The mean ages of academics in the study group and control group were 37.46±7.34 and 41.26±10.06 years, respectively. Although computer-based work environment ergonomics were similar (P>0.05) in both groups during the pandemic, the incidence rate of musculoskeletal disorders was significantly high in the study group (P<0.001). These disorders were mostly seen in the neck, back, and waist regions (P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS The results suggested that the incidence rate of musculoskeletal disorders increased in academics who provided distance education during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Distance , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Musculoskeletal System , Occupational Diseases , Male , Humans , Female , Adult , Working Conditions , Pandemics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Ergonomics
5.
J Environ Public Health ; 2023: 1798434, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2250618

ABSTRACT

Introduction: Working people are exposed to occupational hazards and are at risk of having occupational disease or injury in a rapidly industrializing country like Malaysia. This study aims to review and summarize the occupational disease and injury in Malaysia from 2016 to 2021. Methods: This study used PubMed and Scopus databases to conduct a systematic literature search using a set of keywords. The selected records dated from 1 January 2016 to 8 September 2021 were extracted into the Mendeley Desktop and ATLAS.ti 8 software. Systematic screening was conducted by two independent researchers and finalized by the third researcher. Data were coded and grouped according to the themes. The results were presented as the table for descriptive analysis and cross-tabulation between the themes. Results: A total of 120 records were included in this study. Under the theme of main health problems, the findings showed that mental health, infectious disease, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders are the top three problems being discussed in the literature for the working people in Malaysia. The findings also showed an increasing trend of mental health problems during pandemic COVID-19 years. In addition, hospital was the highest workplace where the occupational health problems were reported.Discussion/Conclusion. There was substantial work on the mental health problem, infectious diseases, and work-related musculoskeletal disorders as the main health problem among workers in Malaysia in the past five years. The employers must report any occupational health and injury case to the authority and prompt intervention can be initiated.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Health , Humans , Malaysia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/etiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/prevention & control , Mental Health
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(6)2023 03 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2258588

ABSTRACT

Teleworking has spread drastically during the COVID-19 pandemic, but its effect on musculo-skeletal disorders (MSD) remains unclear. We aimed to make a qualitative systematic review on the effect of teleworking on MSD. Following the PRISMA guidelines, several databases were searched using strings based on MSD and teleworking keywords. A two-step selection process was used to select relevant studies and a risk of bias assessment was made. Relevant variables were extracted from the articles included, with a focus on study design, population, definition of MSD, confounding factors, and main results. Of 205 studies identified, 25 were included in the final selection. Most studies used validated questionnaires to assess MSD, six considered confounders extensively, and seven had a control group. The most reported MSD were lower back and neck pain. Some studies found increased prevalence or pain intensity, while others did not. Risk of bias was high, with only 5 studies with low/probably low risk of bias. Conflicting results on the effect of teleworking on MSD were found, though an increase in MSD related to organizational and ergonomic factors seems to emerge. Future studies should focus on longitudinal approaches and consider ergonomic and work organization factors as well as socio-economic status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Teleworking , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Neck Pain/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(4)2023 Feb 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2241768

ABSTRACT

The prevalence of musculoskeletal disorders (MSD) has increased significantly in recent years. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a fundamental change in the lifestyles, ways of learning and working patterns of the general population, which in turn, might lead to health consequences. The aim of this study was to evaluate the conditions of e-learning and the impact of the learning modality on the occurrence of musculoskeletal symptoms among university students in Poland. This cross-sectional study included 914 students who completed an anonymous questionnaire. The questions covered two time periods (before and during the COVID-19 pandemic) and were aimed at obtaining information about lifestyle (including physical activity using the modified International Physical Activity Questionnaire, 2007 (IPAQ), perceived stress and sleep patterns), the ergonomics of computer workstations (by Rapid Office Strain Assessment, 2012 (ROSA) method), the incidence and severity of musculoskeletal symptoms (by the Nordic Musculoskeletal Questionnaire, 2018 (NMQ)) and headaches. The main differences between the two periods were statistically significant according to the Wilcoxon test in terms of physical activity, computer use time, and severity of headaches. During the COVID-19 pandemic, there was a significant increase in MSD (68.2% vs. 74.6%) and their intensity (2.83 ± 2.36 vs. 3.50 ± 2.79 points) among the student population (p < 0.001). In the group of students with MSD, there was a high musculoskeletal load, due to the lack of ergonomic remote learning workstations. In future, a thorough study should be carried out, and there is an urgent need to raise students' awareness of arranging learning workstations according to ergonomic principles in order to prevent the occurrence of musculoskeletal problems.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Computer-Assisted Instruction , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Universities , Pandemics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Students , Headache/epidemiology , Ergonomics , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
Cent Eur J Public Health ; 30(3): 201-204, 2022 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2217869

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the analysis was to determine the probable places of coronavirus transmission in association with the work and compare the situation between 2020 and 2021. METHODS: The work analysed data from the Information System of Infectious Diseases managed by the Institute of Health Information and Statistics of the Czech Republic in the period from March 2020 - December 2021. RESULTS: 2,483,219 COVID-19 cases were officially confirmed (732,202 during 2020 and 1,338,790 in 2021), from them 140,368 (6%) represented work-related disease, 520,830 cases (21%) work-related contact, and 1,822,021 (73%) out-of-work contact. There were identified 13 occupations with the highest incidence of COVID-19 in the observed period (458,341 cases), in descending order - clerk, machinist, teacher, craftsman, worker/agency worker, driver, sales worker/cashier, warehouse worker/expediter, nurse, manager, food worker, paramedic, and social worker. Comparing 2020 and 2021, there was a difference in the ranking of occupations by incidence of disease. In 2021, the risk of infection acquiring increased for the occupations clerk, machinist, craftsman, worker/agency worker, manager, and food worker, while it decreased for the health professions (nurse, other paramedic, physician) and for social worker; 5,514 cases of COVID-19 were recognized as an occupational disease in 2020 and 2021, from them 5,483 cases (99.4%) in the health and social care economic activity sector. CONCLUSION: The available data show probable exposures to an infectious agent (without proof of specific contact with the source of the infection), of which 27% cases of COVID-19 are related to work (cases of work-related disease and work-related contact represented together the closest relationship to work). Different relevant anti-epidemic measures in the workplace have considerable practical importance for epidemic control. The use of personal protection of the mouth and nose with respirators/muffs is essential to reduce the risk of airborne transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , Czech Republic/epidemiology , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(2)2023 Jan 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2200071

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is considered an occupational disease (OD), when infection occurs at the workplace for health workers (HW). Because of the increased infection risk of these workers, they were deemed to be a priority group when the vaccination campaign started in Germany in December 2020. By December 2021, more than 90% of HW had been vaccinated twice. We studied the number and the time trend concerning the severity of OD claims related to COVID-19. Workers' compensation claims for OD are recorded in a standardized database of the Statutory Accident Insurance and Prevention in the Health and Welfare Services (BGW). We analyzed all notifiable COVID-19 related claims filed between 1 March 2020 and 30 September 2022. The proportion of severe cases was estimated by inpatient stays, injury benefit payments, rehabilitation measures, and deaths. The data analysis was descriptive. Due to COVID-19, 317,403 notifiable cases were reported to the BGW. Of these, 200,505 (63.2%) had thus far been recognized as OD. The number of notifiable cases was highest in 2022 and lowest in 2020. In total, 3289 insured individuals were admitted to rehabilitation management. This represented 1.6% of all recognized ODs due to COVID-19 at the BGW. The proportion of cases admitted to rehabilitation management decreased from 4.5% of all recognized ODs in 2020 to 3.2% in 2021 and to 0.1% of all recognized cases in 2022. For inpatient stays, injury benefit payment, and death, a similar trend was observed. Therefore, it might be concluded that the successful vaccination campaign mitigated the negative health effects of COVID-19 on HW. Even with vaccination, severe cases can occur. Therefore, infection prevention at the workplace remains paramount.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Workplace , Germany/epidemiology , Workers' Compensation
10.
Work ; 75(2): 375-381, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2198555

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal problems are common in musicians. Coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) has brought with it lockdowns and quarantine periods, and as a result, caused physical and psychological problems. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate musculoskeletal problems, attitudes and behaviors related to physical activity, and social media addiction in musicians during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: This cross-sectional study was conducted on a total of 137 musicians (string, keyboard, wind, percussion instrument players, and vocalists) online. Musculoskeletal problems with Cornell Musculoskeletal Discomfort Questionnaire (CMDQ), attitudes and behaviors related to physical activity with Cognitive Behavioral Physical Activity Questionnaire (CBPAQ), social media addiction with Bergen Social Media Addiction Scale (BSMAS) were evaluated. RESULTS: In CMDQ, it was found that upper back, lower back, and neck problems were more common in all musicians. There were no differences between instrument groups in terms of CBPAQ sub-dimensions, total CBPAQ, and total BSMAS (p > 0.05). CONCLUSION: Considering the dramatic effects of COVID-19, it may be important not to ignore musicians' musculoskeletal problems. It is recommended to design future studies investigating the effects of social media platforms on physical activity awareness by turning the opportunities of COVID-19 into advantages for challenges in musicians.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Music , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Internet Addiction Disorder , Pandemics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Communicable Disease Control , Attitude
11.
BMC Musculoskelet Disord ; 23(1): 745, 2022 Aug 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1965775

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: In order to reduce the risk of infection with Sars-Cov-2, work practices have been shifted to the home office in many industries. The first surveys concerning this shift indicate an increase in musculoskeletal complaints of many employees. The aim of this study was to compare the ergonomic risk in the upper extremities and trunk of working in a home office with that of working in an ergonomically optimized workplace. METHODS: For this purpose, 20 subjects (13w/7m) aged 18-31 years each performed a 20-minute workplace simulation (10 min writing a text, 10 min editing a questionnaire) in the following set up: on a dining table with dining chair and laptop (home office) and on an ergonomically adjusted workstation (ergonomically optimized workplace). The subjects were investigated using a combined application of a motion capture kinematic analysis and the rapid upper limb assessment (RULA) in order to identify differences in the ergonomic risk. RESULTS: Significantly reduced risk values for both shoulders (left: p < 0.001; right: p = 0.02) were found for the ergonomically optimized workstations. In contrast, the left wrist (p = 0.025) showed a significantly reduced ergonomic risk value for the home office workstation. CONCLUSION: This study is the first study to compare the ergonomic risk between an ergonomically optimized workplace and a home office workstation. The results indicate minor differences in the upper extremities in favor of the ergonomically optimized workstation. Since work-related musculoskeletal complaints of the upper extremities are common among office workers, the use of an ergonomically optimized workstation for home use is recommended based on the results.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Ergonomics/methods , Humans , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Pilot Projects , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 935405, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142316

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To determine the prevalence and factors associated with computer vision syndrome in medical students at a private university in Paraguay. Methods: A survey study was conducted in 2021 in a sample of 228 medical students from the Universidad del Pacífico, Paraguay. The dependent variable was CVS, measured with the Computer Visual Syndrome Questionnaire (CVS-Q). Its association with covariates (hours of daily use of notebook, smartphone, tablet and PC, taking breaks when using equipment, use of preventive visual measures, use of glasses, etc.) was examined. Results: The mean age was 22.3 years and 71.5% were women. CVS was present in 82.5% of participants. Higher prevalence of CVS was associated with wearing a framed lens (PR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.03-1.20). In contrast, taking a break when using electronic equipment at least every 20 min and every 1 h reduced 7% (PR = 0.93, 95% CI: 0.87-0.99) and 6% (PR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89-0.99) the prevalence of CVS, respectively. Conclusion: Eight out of 10 students experienced CVS during the COVID-19 pandemic. The use of framed lenses increased the presence of CVS, while taking breaks when using electronic equipment at least every 20 min and every 1 h reduced CVS.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Students, Medical , Adult , Computers , Cross-Sectional Studies , Ergonomics , Female , Humans , Male , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Paraguay/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Syndrome , Universities , Young Adult
13.
Pan Afr Med J ; 43: 82, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2114906

ABSTRACT

Introduction: the global pandemic of COVID-19 is the unique health crisis, the populations were exposed to situations of unprecedented confinement, this represents a major public health challenge, with a high risk of developing musculoskeletal disorders. The objective of the present work is to identify the potential effects of sedentary behavior on musculoskeletal health and physical performance. Methods: after two months of confinement a survey was uploaded and shared on Google's online survey platform. Two research laboratories, University Moulay Ismail, University Ibn Tofail, promoted the survey which was developed on the basis of two questionnaires: the French version of the Nordic questionnaire musculoskeletal disorders and the French version of the Global Physical Activity Questionnaire (GPAQ). Results: out of 384 respondents, 209 (54.4%) were females 124 (32.3%) were between 30-49 years old (6.8%) and 123 (32%) had an underweight and overweight levels, respectively. One hundred and thirty-nine 139 (36.2%) reported sitting more than eight hours. The results of our survey show that many of our respondents had developed some sort of musculoskeletal pain during the confinement. One hundred and sixty two (42.2%) reported to have pain in the lower back region, 108 (28.1%) of participants reported to have pain in the neck region, 93 (28.2%) in the shoulder region, 97 (25.3) - in the upper back region and more women than men reported musculoskeletal pain in more than five regions. The results of our survey also show that 322 (83,9%) of the participants, after two months of confinement, were unable to do high intensity exercises for at least 10 min per day in their usual daytime activity, the prevalence of musculoskeletal pain differed across categories of body mass index (BMI) between males and females, (p<0.05). Conclusion: the results of this study show the existence of musculoskeletal disorders and deterioration in physical performance and strongly recommend the urgent implementation of prevention and remediation interventions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Musculoskeletal Pain , Occupational Diseases , Male , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Musculoskeletal Pain/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Physical Functional Performance , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Prevalence
14.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(11): 964-969, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2107634

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We surveyed how home-working conditions, specifically furniture and computer use, affected self-reported musculoskeletal problems and work performance. METHODS: Questionnaires from 4112 homeworkers were analyzed. The relationship between subjective musculoskeletal problems or work performance and working conditions were determined by logistic regression analyses. RESULTS: More than half the homeworkers used a work desk, work chair, and laptop computer. However, approximately 20% of homeworkers used a low table, floor chair/floor cushion, or other furniture that was different from the office setup. Using a table of disproportionate size and height, sofa, floor cushion, and floor chair were associated with neck/shoulder pain or low back pain. Disproportionate table and chair, floor cushion, and tablet computer were associated with poor work performance. CONCLUSIONS: Disproportionate desk and chair, floor cushion/chair, and computer with small screen may affect musculoskeletal problems and home-working performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Work Performance , Humans , Interior Design and Furnishings , COVID-19/epidemiology , Teleworking , Pandemics , Computers , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Musculoskeletal Diseases/complications , Ergonomics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/complications
17.
Rev Lat Am Enfermagem ; 29: e3455, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2054539

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: to analyze evidence concerning the risks of occupational illnesses to which health workers providing care to patients infected with COVID-19 are exposed. METHOD: integrative literature review conducted in the following online databases: Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (MEDLINE/PubMed), Web of Science (WoS), Excerpta Medica Data-Base (EMBASE), Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) and Scopus (Elsevier). Original articles published between November 2019 and June 2020, regardless of the language written, were included. A descriptive analysis according to two categories is presented. RESULTS: the sample is composed of 19 scientific papers. Most were cross-sectional studies with an evidence level 2C (n=17, 90%) written in English (n=16, 84%). The primary thematic axes were risk of contamination and risk of psycho-emotional illness arising from the delivery of care to patients infected with COVID-19. CONCLUSION: the review presents the potential effects of providing care to patients with COVID-19 on the health of workers. It also reveals the importance of interventions focused on the most prevalent occupational risks during the pandemic. The studies' level of evidence suggests a need for studies with more robust designs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Eur J Epidemiol ; 37(10): 1061-1070, 2022 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2048367

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, rehearsal and concert activities of professional orchestras and choirs were severely restricted based on the assumption of particularly high infection risks associated with wind instruments and singing. Therefore, our primary objective was to determine the incidence of SARS-CoV-2 infections in orchestra and choir musicians compared to controls. We also assessed influenza, flu, upper respiratory tract infections, and course of illness. Musicians from professional orchestras and choirs and controls from 23 institutions throughout Germany were included in a prospective cohort study. Data were collected from October 2020 to June 2021 by weekly online surveys. A mixed-effects cox proportional hazards model was used to assess the effect of exposure by professional activity on SARS-CoV-2 infection. In 1,097 participants (46.7 years (SD 10.3); 46.8% female; 705 orchestra, 154 choir, and 238 control subjects) 40 SARS-CoV-2 infections occurred. Cases per person-years were 0.06 in orchestras, 0.11 in choirs, and 0.03 in controls. Hazard ratios compared to controls were 1.74 (95% CI 0.58 to 5.25, p = 0.320) for orchestra musicians and 2.97 (0.87 to 10.28, p = 0.087) for choir singers. Infection source was suspected predominantly in private contexts. Disease courses were mild to moderate. Other respiratory infections were reported in 6.1% of study weeks in orchestras, 10.1% in choirs, and 8.0% in controls. Sick leave days of total study days were 0.5, 2.1 and 1.3%, respectively. This epidemiologic study during the pandemic in professional musicians indicates no increased risk of SARS-CoV-2 infections in orchestra musicians and a trend towards increased risk in choir singers compared to controls. However, the exact routes of infection could not be validated. If appropriate hygiene concepts are adhered to, safe orchestra and choir activity appears possible in pandemic times.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Humans , Female , Male , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043712

ABSTRACT

Against the backdrop of the COVID-19 pandemic, it is necessary to identify these risks and determine whether the current level of management is appropriate to respond to the risk of biological hazards depending on the occupation. In this study, the incidence and fatality rates of occupational diseases were calculated using industrial accident statistics of South Korea, and trends by year using joinpoint regression and relative risk by industry using k-means clustering were evaluated for infectious diseases. We found that infectious diseases had the third highest incidence and fourth highest fatalities among all occupational diseases. In the incidence rate, joinpoints appeared in 2009 and 2018, and the annual percent change changed to 7.79, -16.63, and 82.11. The fatality rate showed a consistent increase with an annual percent change of 4.37, but it was not significant. Industries were classified into five groups according to risk, and the legal control measures of certain industries were not sufficient. Follow-up studies are needed to rectify the structural limitations of industrial accident statistics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Accidents, Occupational , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cluster Analysis , Communicable Diseases/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology
20.
Med Lav ; 113(4): e2022031, 2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2026274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and work-related stress are among the factors that can negatively affect work ability. Given the importance of midwives' health, this study aims to evaluate the work ability of midwives and to investigate its association with the prevalence of MSDs and work-related stress in midwifery. METHODS: Ninety-one midwives participated in this study. Three questionnaires, including Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ) plus body map, Persian version of work ability index (WAI) questionnaire, and Health and Safety Executive (HSE) job stress questionnaire, were used to collect data. Finally, the association of MSDs, work-related stress, and individual characteristics with WAI among midwives was investigated. RESULTS: The highest rates of pain and discomfort were reported in the lower back and neck. The mean job stress was 116.08 with the highest scores on demand, role, and control subscales. The work ability among midwives was at an acceptable level of 39.07 on average. Inter-variable association analysis showed that the work ability was significantly associated with pain in the past 12 months and the number of coexisting MSDs. Job stress was not associated with work ability. CONCLUSIONS: Midwives' WAI was at an acceptable level despite high prevalence of MSDs in midwives, the confirmation of the possible correlation between MSDs and work ability, as well as the high job stress in midwifery. Since the present study was conducted during the Covid-19 pandemic, the high stress in midwives may be partly due to the pandemic and may not be permanent. However, this level of stress may reduce the midwives' work ability over a long time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Midwifery , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Capacity Evaluation
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