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1.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0259213, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1496532

ABSTRACT

Healthcare workers have had the longest and most direct exposure to COVID-19 and consequently may suffer from poor mental health. We conducted one of the first repeated multi-country analysis of the mental wellbeing of medical doctors (n = 5,275) at two timepoints during the COVID-19 pandemic (June 2020 and November/December 2020) to understand the prevalence of anxiety and depression, as well as associated risk factors. Rates of anxiety and depression were highest in Italy (24.6% and 20.1%, June 2020), second highest in Catalonia (15.9% and 17.4%, June 2020), and lowest in the UK (11.7% and 13.7%, June 2020). Across all countries, higher risk of anxiety and depression symptoms were found among women, individuals below 60 years old, those feeling vulnerable/exposed at work, and those reporting normal/below-normal health. We did not find systematic differences in mental health measures between the two rounds of data collection, hence we cannot discard that the mental health repercussions of the pandemic are persistent.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Physicians/psychology , Adult , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Italy , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics
3.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 225-231, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401810

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The crisis situation generated by COVID-19 and the measures adopted have generated social changes in the normal dynamics of the general population and especially for health workers, who find themselves caring for patients with suspected or confirmed infection. Recent studies have detected in them depression and anxiety symptoms and burnout syndrome, with personal and social conditions impacting their response capacity during the health emergency. Our aim was to generate recommendations for the promotion and protection of the mental health of health workers and teams in the first line of care in the health emergency due to COVID-19. METHODS: A rapid literature search was carried out in PubMed and Google Scholar, and an iterative expert consensus and through electronic consultation, with 13 participants from the areas of psychology, psychiatry and medicine; the grading of its strength and directionality was carried out according to the international standards of the Joanna Briggs Institute. RESULTS: Thirty-one recommendations were generated on self-care of health workers, community care among health teams, screening for alarm signs in mental health and for health institutions. CONCLUSIONS: The promotion and protection activities in mental health to face the health emergency generated by COVID-19 worldwide can include coordinated actions between workers, health teams and health institutions as part of a comprehensive, community care, co-responsible and sustained over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Health Services/methods , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/standards , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/standards , Self Care/methods , Self Care/standards
4.
BMC Nephrol ; 22(1): 301, 2021 09 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398847

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, renal healthcare practitioners provide intensive and protracted support to a highly complex multi-morbid patient population however knowledge about the impact of COVID-19 on these practitioners is extremely limited. OBJECTIVE: This study aimed to explore the experiences of COVID-19 with renal healthcare practitioners during the first global lockdown between June 2020 and September 2020. METHODS: A multi-methods approach was carried out including a quantitative survey and qualitative interviews. This was a multinational study of renal healthcare practitioners from 29 countries. Quantitative: A self-designed survey on COVID-19 experiences and standardised questionnaires (General Health Questionnaire-12; Maslach Burnout Inventory). Descriptive statistics were generated for numerical data. Qualitative: Online semi-structured interviews were conducted. Data was subjected to thematic analysis. Renal healthcare practitioners (n = 251) completed an online survey. Thirteen renal healthcare practitioners took part in semi-structured interviews (12 nurses and 1 dietician). RESULTS: The majority of participants surveyed were female (86.9 %; n = 218), nurses (86.9 %; n = 218) with an average 21.5 (SD = 11.1) years' experience since professional qualification, and 16.3 years (SD = 9.3) working in renal healthcare. Survey responses indicated a level of preparedness, training and satisfactory personal protective equipment during the pandemic however approximately 40.3 % experienced fear about attending work, and 49.8 % experienced mental health distress. The highest prevalence of burnout was emotional exhaustion (35.9 %). Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis highlighting the holistic complexities in managing renal healthcare, a neglected specialist workforce, and the need for appropriate support at work during a pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Results have highlighted the psychological impact, in terms of emotional exhaustion and mental health distress in our sample of renal healthcare practitioners. As the pandemic has continued, it is important to consider the long-term impact on an already stretched workforce including the risk of developing mental health disorders. Future research and interventions are required to understand and improve the provision of psychological support for specialist medical and nursing personnel.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Global Health , Nephrology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Adult , Aged , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , COVID-19/therapy , Clinical Competence/statistics & numerical data , Fear/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nephrology Nursing/economics , Nephrology Nursing/statistics & numerical data , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychological Distress , Qualitative Research , Workforce
7.
Occup Environ Med ; 78(11): 801-808, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1286749

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study reports preliminary findings on the prevalence of, and factors associated with, mental health and well-being outcomes of healthcare workers during the early months (April-June) of the COVID-19 pandemic in the UK. METHODS: Preliminary cross-sectional data were analysed from a cohort study (n=4378). Clinical and non-clinical staff of three London-based NHS Trusts, including acute and mental health Trusts, took part in an online baseline survey. The primary outcome measure used is the presence of probable common mental disorders (CMDs), measured by the General Health Questionnaire. Secondary outcomes are probable anxiety (seven-item Generalised Anxiety Disorder), depression (nine-item Patient Health Questionnaire), post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) (six-item Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder checklist), suicidal ideation (Clinical Interview Schedule) and alcohol use (Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test). Moral injury is measured using the Moray Injury Event Scale. RESULTS: Analyses showed substantial levels of probable CMDs (58.9%, 95% CI 58.1 to 60.8) and of PTSD (30.2%, 95% CI 28.1 to 32.5) with lower levels of depression (27.3%, 95% CI 25.3 to 29.4), anxiety (23.2%, 95% CI 21.3 to 25.3) and alcohol misuse (10.5%, 95% CI 9.2 to 11.9). Women, younger staff and nurses tended to have poorer outcomes than other staff, except for alcohol misuse. Higher reported exposure to moral injury (distress resulting from violation of one's moral code) was strongly associated with increased levels of probable CMDs, anxiety, depression, PTSD symptoms and alcohol misuse. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that mental health support for healthcare workers should consider those demographics and occupations at highest risk. Rigorous longitudinal data are needed in order to respond to the potential long-term mental health impacts of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Prevalence , Psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Suicidal Ideation , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology
9.
Acad Med ; 96(9): 1233-1235, 2021 09 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1246781

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted both that frontline workers face a new set of personal hazards in health care settings and that there are not well-established recommendations to address the broader risks to these workers and their families. Particularly vulnerable households include dual health care professional households, single-parent health care professional households, and households with health care professionals responsible for a high-risk family member (i.e., an older adult or immunocompromised person). While the demographics of these households are heterogeneous, it is expected that the professional and personal concerns specific to COVID-19 will be similar. These concerns include family safety, balancing full-time work with home-based schooling for children, the looming threat of illness to 1 or both partners, the potential of infecting high-risk family members, and the challenges of planning for the future during uncertain times. To elucidate these concerns in their department, the authors sought input from colleagues in dual health care professional households through an open-ended email communication. Respondents expressed a range of concerns centered on balancing professional and family responsibilities during the COVID-19 pandemic. In this commentary, the authors propose several recommendations in the areas of support networks, leadership and culture, and operations and logistics that health care institutions can adopt to minimize the burden on these vulnerable households during states of emergency. The successful implementation of these recommendations hinges on creating a work environment in which all health care providers feel comfortable voicing their concerns.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Family , Health Personnel , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Occupational Diseases/economics , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Safety , Social Support , United States , Vulnerable Populations , Work-Life Balance
10.
Riv Psichiatr ; 56(2): 57-63, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1202085

ABSTRACT

Health professionals have been at the frontline of the health service since the outbreak of covid-19, responding promptly to diagnose, support and treat infected patients. World Health Organization (WHO) has already praised their contribution and their essential role in controlling this disease. Some of the main concerns of covid-19's impact to health service staff include work overload, exhaustion, and high risk of self-infection or transmission to family members. Moreover, during the pandemic, caregivers' mental health inevitably becomes vulnerable, with salient stress and anxiety-related symptoms. Uncertainty, fear of contagion, guilt, hopelessness, stigmatization and, in some cases, long-term post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) are few of the potential effects posed by this outbreak on health workers. In this review, lessons learnt from previous global crises or pandemics on the psychological impact of health workers are presented. History could potentially provide essential information on how to best manage, support and optimize our approach to this highly appreciated and much needed group of professionals. Targeted and prompt interventions could reduce the psychological strain of health professionals, thus, further improving provided patient care. Covid-19 is an on-going health crisis and this work, even though generated by limited existing data, could be used to inform governments and/or institutions and lead on decisions and changes in current guidelines.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Psychological Distress , Cost of Illness , Humans , Occupational Diseases/etiology
11.
Healthc Q ; 24(1): 44-49, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190653

ABSTRACT

Pandemics are associated with heightened distress among healthcare workers (HCWs). We report qualitative findings from a two-stage survey administered to HCWs at a large acute care hospital in Ontario during the COVID-19 pandemic to identify their concerns and wellness needs. Responses reflected HCWs' desires to be heard, protected, prepared, supported and cared for by the organization. HCWs' concerns were diverse and dynamic, reflecting the specific circumstances of their work and personal lives as well as the shifting landscape of the pandemic. We discuss implications for organizations seeking to promote and protect HCWs' psychological well-being and resilience during pandemics.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Health Personnel/standards , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Personnel, Hospital/standards , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Ann Ist Super Sanita ; 57(1): 7-17, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During epidemics, health care workers (HCWs) are particularly exposed to the risk of secondary trauma. If not effectively addressed, the consequences of such psychological distress can progress to more severe conditions. METHODS: A systematic search of several databases on the effect of SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 epidemics on the mental health of HCWs was performed according to both the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the WHO Rapid Review Guide for Health Policy and Systems Research. RESULTS: The 77 reviewed studies highlighted that work organization and individual characteristics can add to mental health risk. Providing adequate training to prevent infection and prepare HCWs to handle the epidemic, strengthening team work to improve organization, and ensuring appropriate protective equipment is available can help prevent risk of psychiatric illness. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring and addressing through tailored interventions the mental health consequences of pandemics in HCWs is necessary.


Subject(s)
Epidemics , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Risk Factors
13.
Health Qual Life Outcomes ; 19(1): 103, 2021 Mar 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1147072

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: More than 210,000 medical workers have fought against the outbreak of Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Hubei in China since December 2019. However, the prevalence of mental health problems in frontline medical staff after fighting COVID-19 is still unknown. METHODS: Medical workers in Wuhan and other cities in Hubei Province were invited to participate a cross-sectional and convenience sampling online survey, which assessed the prevalence of anxiety, insomnia, depression, and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). RESULTS: A total of 1,091 responses (33% male and 67% female) were valid for statistical analysis. The prevalence was anxiety 53%, insomnia 79%, depression 56%, and PTSD 11%. Healthcare workers in Wuhan were more likely to face risks of anxiety (56% vs. 52%, P = 0.03) and PTSD (15% vs. 9%, P = 0.03) than those in other cities of Hubei. In terms of educational attainment, those with doctoral and masters' (D/M) degrees may experience more anxiety (median of 7.0, [interquartile range (IQR) 2.0-8.5] vs. median 5.0 [IQR 5.0-8.0], P = 0.02) and PTSD (median 26.0 [IQR 19.5-33.0] vs. median 23.0 [IQR 19.0-31.0], P = 0.04) than those with lower educational degrees. CONCLUSIONS: The mental problems were an important issue for the healthcare workers after COVID-19. Thus, an early intervention on such mental problems is necessary for healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depressive Disorder/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Prevalence , Psychometrics , Quality of Life , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Esc. Anna Nery Rev. Enferm ; 25(spe): e20200370, 2021. tab
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1127852

ABSTRACT

Objetivo: Analisar a prevalência de sintomas depressão, ansiedade e fatores associados em profissionais da equipe de enfermagem durante a pandemia da Covid-19. Métodos: Estudo seccional do tipo web survey, com 490 com profissionais de enfermagem dos serviços de média e alta complexidade em um estado do nordeste do Brasil. A associação entre os desfechos e as variáveis independentes foi através do teste de qui-quadrado de Rao-Scott e do modelo de regressão de Poisson. Resultados: A ocorrência de sintomas sugestivos de transtornos mentais (ansiedade e depressão) estava relacionada a profissionais de enfermagem do sexo feminino, cor ou raça parda, com renda mensal inferior a 5 salários mínimos que trabalhavam no setor privado, ter sintomas de Síndrome de Burnout e morar com os pais. As ocorrências foram mais acentuadas quando os serviços não apresentavam condições adequadas de trabalho, em especial para o enfrentamento da pandemia de Covid-19. Conclusão e implicações para a prática: Ações que visem à melhoria das condições de trabalho e que estimulem a prática de atividades físicas podem ser benéficas para o a manutenção e fortalecimento das condições de saúde mental dessa população


Objective: To analyze the prevalence of symptoms of depression, anxiety and associated factors in Nursing staff during the Covid-19 pandemic. Methods: A cross-sectional web survey study, with 490 Nursing professionals from medium and high complexity services in a state in northeastern Brazil. The association between the outcomes and the independent variables was through the Rao-Scott chi-square test and the Poisson regression model. Results: The occurrence of symptoms suggestive of mental disorders (anxiety and depression) was related to female Nursing professionals, brown skin color or race, with a monthly income below 5 minimum wages and working in the private sector, having symptoms of the Burnout Syndrome and live with their parents. The occurrences were more accentuated when the services did not have adequate working conditions, especially for coping with the Covid-19 pandemic. Conclusion and implications for practice: Actions that aim to improve the working conditions and that encourage the practice of physical activities can be beneficial for the maintenance and strengthening of the mental health conditions of this population


Objetivo: Analizar la prevalencia de síntomas de depresión, ansiedad y factores asociados en el personal de enfermería durante la pandemia de Covid-19. Métodos: Estudio de encuesta web seccional, con 490 profesionales de enfermería de servicios de mediana y alta complejidad en un estado del noreste de Brasil. La asociación entre los resultados y las variables independientes se realizó mediante la prueba de chi-cuadrado de Rao-Scott y el modelo de regresión de Poisson. Resultados: La ocurrencia de síntomas sugestivos de trastornos mentales (ansiedad y depresión) se relacionó con mujeres profesionales de enfermería, de color o raza morena, con ingresos mensuales inferiores a 5 salarios mínimos que trabajaban en el sector privado, presentaban síntomas de Síndrome de Burnout y vivían con los padres. Los episodios eran más acentuados cuando los servicios no contaban con las condiciones laborales adecuadas, especialmente para hacer frente a la pandemia Covid-19. Conclusión e implicaciones para la práctica: Las acciones que tengan como objetivo mejorar las condiciones laborales y que incentiven la práctica de actividades físicas pueden ser beneficiosas para el mantenimiento y fortalecimiento de las condiciones de salud mental de esta población


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Young Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , COVID-19/nursing , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Socioeconomic Factors , Brazil/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Prevalence , Cross-Sectional Studies , Surveys and Questionnaires , Mental Disorders/epidemiology
15.
Int Arch Occup Environ Health ; 94(5): 1023-1032, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1070844

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Studies of previous pandemics indicate that healthcare workers have a high risk of developing symptoms related to mental health, especially depression, anxiety, and stress. OBJECTIVE: To identify mental disorder symptoms among Brazilian healthcare workers during the Sars-Cov-2 pandemic and compare findings in different work categories. METHODS: This was an online cross-sectional study. Information related to the pandemic and mental disorder symptoms was collected. The Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale and the Impact of Event Scale-revised were used. Associations were estimated by the chi-square test. The mean scores were compared among work categories with ANOVA (α = 5%) and the prevalence of symptoms was estimated. RESULTS: 1,609 healthcare workers participated in the survey [mean age: 36.9 (SD = 11.6) years, women = 83.6%]. There was no association between work category and changes in mental health during the pandemic (p = 0.288) or prevalence of unsafe feeling (p = 0.218). A significant relationship was observed between maintaining work activities during the pandemic and work category (p < 0.001). Physicians had the lowest out-of-work prevalence (9.5%) while dentists had the highest (32.3%). Physicians and nurses showed the highest prevalence of in-person work routine. Psychologists presented the highest prevalence of remote work (64.0%) while dentists had the lowest (20.2%). A high prevalence of depression (D), anxiety (A), and stress (S) symptoms was observed in all professional categories (D: 57.2, 95% CI 48.3-66.1%; A: 46.20%, 95% CI = 37.2-55.2%; S: 55.80%, 95% CI = 46.8-64.8%), with physicians (D = 38.4%, A = 25.80%, S = 37.90%), psychologists (D = 50.2%, A = 39.0%, S = 43.1%), and nurses (D = 50.0%, A = 40.9%, S = 49.0%) having significantly lower scores. Psychologists had the lowest pandemic-related psychological impact (42.70%, 95% CI 36.8-48.6%). CONCLUSION: Extreme changes in the work routine of dentists and psychologists and an overall high prevalence of mental symptoms due to the pandemic were found. Researchers should focus on gathering information that can identify workers at increased risk of mental illness to guide discussions and develop actions to minimize the harm of the pandemic. In addition, we suggest that healthcare and support systems urgently adopt mental health care measures with specialized professionals to protect the psychological well-being of the healthcare community.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/psychology , Brazil/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , Work/psychology , Workplace/psychology
16.
Encephale ; 46(3S): S73-S80, 2020 Jun.
Article in French | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065049

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has caused major sanitary crisis worldwide. Half of the world has been placed in quarantine. In France, this large-scale health crisis urgently triggered the restructuring and reorganization of health service delivery to support emergency services, medical intensive care units and continuing care units. Health professionals mobilized all their resources to provide emergency aid in a general climate of uncertainty. Concerns about the mental health, psychological adjustment, and recovery of health care workers treating and caring for patients with COVID-19 are now arising. The goal of the present article is to provide up-to-date information on potential mental health risks associated with exposure of health professionals to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Authors performed a narrative review identifying relevant results in the scientific and medical literature considering previous epidemics of 2003 (SARS-CoV-1) and 2009 (H1N1) with the more recent data about the COVID-19 pandemic. We highlighted most relevant data concerning the disease characteristics, the organizational factors and personal factors that may contribute to developing psychological distress and other mental health symptoms. RESULTS: The disease characteristics of the current COVID-19 pandemic provoked a generalized climate of wariness and uncertainty, particularly among health professionals, due to a range of causes such as the rapid spread of COVID-19, the severity of symptoms it can cause in a segment of infected individuals, the lack of knowledge of the disease, and deaths among health professionals. Stress may also be caused by organizational factors, such as depletion of personal protection equipment, concerns about not being able to provide competent care if deployed to new area, concerns about rapidly changing information, lack of access to up-to-date information and communication, lack of specific drugs, the shortage of ventilators and intensive care unit beds necessary to care for the surge of critically ill patients, and significant change in their daily social and family life. Further risk factors have been identified, including feelings of being inadequately supported, concerns about health of self, fear of taking home infection to family members or others, and not having rapid access to testing through occupational health if needed, being isolated, feelings of uncertainty and social stigmatization, overwhelming workload, or insecure attachment. Additionally, we discussed positive social and organizational factors that contribute to enhance resilience in the face of the pandemic. There is a consensus in all the relevant literature that health care professionals are at an increased risk of high levels of stress, anxiety, depression, burnout, addiction and post-traumatic stress disorder, which could have long-term psychological implications. CONCLUSIONS: In the long run, this tragic health crisis should significantly enhance our understanding of the mental health risk factors among the health care professionals facing the COVID-19 pandemic. Reporting information such as this is essential to plan future prevention strategies. Protecting health care professionals is indeed an important component of public health measures to address large-scale health crisis. Thus, interventions to promote mental well-being in health care professionals exposed to COVID-19 need to be immediately implemented, and to strengthen prevention and response strategies by training health care professionals on mental help and crisis management.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Adaptation, Psychological , Anxiety/etiology , Behavior, Addictive/etiology , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care , Depression/etiology , France/epidemiology , Health Workforce , Helplessness, Learned , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Influenza Pandemic, 1918-1919 , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Protective Devices/supply & distribution , Resilience, Psychological , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Social Support , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Suicide/psychology , Suicide/statistics & numerical data , Uncertainty , Work Schedule Tolerance/psychology , Workload
17.
Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) ; 31: S107-S111, 2021 Feb.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065072

ABSTRACT

Objective: To make a synthesis of the available scientific evidence in the emotional management of the declared health crisis in the face of coronavirus. Methods: A bibliographic search was made, without date limit, in Medline, CINAHL®, PsycINFO®, Scopus and Web of Science™ databases using the following keywords "emotional management", "health crisis" and "health crisis response". Initially, 73 studies were identified and, after selecting them according to eligibility criteria, 10 were included. Results: The main recommendations based on the available evidence indicate emotional management measures such as offering support groups to professionals, ensuring their social non-discrimination, strengthening their confidence and control capacity through training actions, as well as reinforcing the recognition of nurses by the community. Discussion and conclusions: The accumulated evidence comes from experience with previous outbreaks of SARS-CoV-1 and MERS-CoV. Stress was the most studied aspect, concerning issues such as social stigma, professionalism, intention to care, burnout, ethical conflicts, anxiety, depression or guilt. The emotional management of health crises in the face of the coronavirus requires an individual, collective, social and institutional strategy to reinforce security on all fronts and reduce fear through effective control measures using sufficient and adequate material and human resources.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/prevention & control , Anxiety/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Ethics, Professional , Guilt , Humans , Intention to Treat Analysis , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/epidemiology , Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome/psychology , Social Stigma
18.
Enferm Clin (Engl Ed) ; 31: S35-S39, 2021 Feb.
Article in Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1065068

ABSTRACT

The health crisis caused by the COVID-19 virus pandemic has once again highlighted the role of health professionals as a key element for their containment, who suffer from high tension marked by healthcare pressure and the lack of means of protection. Given this tension, it is relevant to analyze the emotional impact on health professionals of the coronavirus pandemic and the coping resources to reduce or mitigate this impact. Stress, sleep disorders and depressive symptoms stand out. Some strategies are recommended that have been used by professionals who have previously been under pressure from COVID-19 and have been helpful to them. Finally, some recommendations whose efficacy is known for managing emotional impact are pointed out.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , Breathing Exercises/methods , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Depression/prevention & control , Depression/psychology , Exercise , Guidelines as Topic , Humans , Mindfulness/methods , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Psychotherapy , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/prevention & control , Symptom Assessment/methods
19.
Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry ; 104: 110062, 2021 01 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1049863

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Psychological suffering by health professionals may be associated with the uncertainty of a safe workplace. Front-line professionals exposed and involved in the diagnosis and treatment of COVID-19 patients are more susceptible. METHOD: This review was conducted based on papers that were published at MEDLINE, BMJ, PsycINFO, and LILACS, the according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyzes (PRISMA). RESULTS: Health professionals had a higher level of anxiety (13.0 vs. 8.5%, p < 0.01, OR = 1.6152; 95%CI 1.3283 to 1.9641; p < 0.0001) and depression 12.2 vs. 9.5%; p = 0.04; OR = 1.3246; 95%CI 1.0930 to 1.6053; p = 0.0042), besides somatizations and insomnia compared to professionals from other areas. CONCLUSION: Health professionals, regardless of their age, showed significant levels of mental disorders. We observed a prevalence of anxiety and depression. Insomnia was a risk factor for both.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Prevalence , Stress, Psychological
20.
Int J Ment Health Nurs ; 30(2): 524-532, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1045710

ABSTRACT

Anxiety and depression are common mental illnesses among nurses fighting coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). However, the precise factors that affect anxiety and depression in this population require further evaluation. This study aimed to explore factors associated with anxiety and depression among nurses fighting COVID-19 in China. We used convenience sampling to recruit 282 nurses fighting COVID-19 in three hospitals. Participants were questioned about demographic characteristics, daily working time, daily sleep duration, sleep quality, anxiety, depression, resilience, and coping styles. Linear regression analysis indicated that resilience (ß = -0.217, P < 0.001), positive coping style (ß = -0.281, P < 0.001), negative coping style (ß = 0.395, P < 0.001), and sleep quality (ß = 0.153, P = 0.010) were predictive factors for anxiety, and the model explained 44.20% (P < 0.001) of variability. Resilience (ß = -0.239, P < 0.001), positive coping style (ß = -0.222, P < 0.001), negative coping style (ß = 0.152, P < 0.001), and sleep quality (ß = 0.104, P = 0.003) were identified as explanatory factors for depression, and the model explained 34.50% (P < 0.001) of variability. The present study suggested that resilience, coping styles, and sleep quality could account for an individual's levels of anxiety and depression.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/nursing , Depression/etiology , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Humans , Middle Aged , Nursing Staff, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Psychological Tests , Resilience, Psychological , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
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