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1.
Rev Colomb Psiquiatr (Engl Ed) ; 50(3): 225-231, 2021.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1401810

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The crisis situation generated by COVID-19 and the measures adopted have generated social changes in the normal dynamics of the general population and especially for health workers, who find themselves caring for patients with suspected or confirmed infection. Recent studies have detected in them depression and anxiety symptoms and burnout syndrome, with personal and social conditions impacting their response capacity during the health emergency. Our aim was to generate recommendations for the promotion and protection of the mental health of health workers and teams in the first line of care in the health emergency due to COVID-19. METHODS: A rapid literature search was carried out in PubMed and Google Scholar, and an iterative expert consensus and through electronic consultation, with 13 participants from the areas of psychology, psychiatry and medicine; the grading of its strength and directionality was carried out according to the international standards of the Joanna Briggs Institute. RESULTS: Thirty-one recommendations were generated on self-care of health workers, community care among health teams, screening for alarm signs in mental health and for health institutions. CONCLUSIONS: The promotion and protection activities in mental health to face the health emergency generated by COVID-19 worldwide can include coordinated actions between workers, health teams and health institutions as part of a comprehensive, community care, co-responsible and sustained over time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/diagnosis , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Health Services/methods , Humans , Mass Screening/methods , Mass Screening/standards , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/psychology , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Occupational Health Services/standards , Preventive Health Services/methods , Preventive Health Services/standards , Self Care/methods , Self Care/standards
2.
Internist (Berl) ; 62(9): 906-920, 2021 Sep.
Article in German | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1355997

ABSTRACT

The attributable proportion of occupation-related influences on airway and lung diseases is 10-30%. In patients with obstructive airway diseases it is extremely important to sufficiently document findings during the period of activities burdening the airway as compared to periods off work. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) can have a work-related (partial) cause even in smokers. Regarding occupational infectious diseases, the main cause up to 2019 was tuberculosis but the corona pandemic has led to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) being the most frequent occupational disease. For the occupational medical assessment of interstitial and malignant pulmonary diseases, checklists can be helpful to support the medical history.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Diseases , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive , Humans , Lung , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/diagnosis , Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive/therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Int Heart J ; 62(3): 465-469, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1247696

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has changed the lives of healthcare professionals, especially vulnerable physicians such as young or female cardiologists. In Japan, they are facing the fear of not only infection but also weak and unstable employment, difficulties in medical practice and training anxiety, implications for research and studying abroad, as well as worsened mental health issues due to social isolation. Conversely, some positive aspects are seen through the holding of remote meetings and conferences. Here, we suggest a new working style for cardiologists, as well as offer solutions to the medical employment problems that have been taken place in Japan.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Cardiologists/psychology , Occupational Health , Physicians, Women/psychology , Age Factors , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/therapy , Biomedical Research/methods , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cardiologists/education , Education, Medical, Graduate/methods , Employment , Female , Humans , Japan , Mental Health , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Physical Distancing , Sexism/psychology , Social Isolation/psychology , Social Support , Vulnerable Populations
6.
Scand J Public Health ; 49(1): 57-63, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1207561

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Pneumonia and influenza are major health concerns and constitute a high economic burden. However, few data are available on the associated risk of pneumonia and influenza and work exposure on a large population scale. AIM: This study aimed to examine the associated risk of pneumonia and influenza by type of work exposure. METHODS: By cross-linking administrative Danish registries, we classified people in 10 different profession types. The main outcome was hospitalisation with pneumonia or influenza. A multivariable Poisson regression analysis was used to assess the associated incidence rate ratio (IRR) of being hospitalised with pneumonia or influenza by type of profession. RESULTS: A total of 1,327,606 people added risk time to the analyses. In a multivariable model, work in day care, public transportation, sewers and nursing home care was associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation with pneumonia compared to work within public administration: IRR=1.20 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.12-1.28), IRR=1.21 (95% CI 1.09-1.34), IRR=1.61 (95% CI 1.19-2.19) and IRR=1.10 (95% CI 1.03-1.18), respectively. In a multivariable analysis, people working within public transportation were associated with an increased risk of hospitalisation with influenza compared to people working within public administration: IRR=2.54 (95% CI 1.79-3.58). CONCLUSIONS: Working in day care, public transportation, sewers and nursing home care increased the associated risk of hospitalisation with pneumonia, and working within public transportation increased the associated risk of being hospitalised with influenza compared to working within public administration.


Subject(s)
Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Influenza, Human/therapy , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Pneumonia/therapy , Adult , Aged , Denmark/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Incidence , Influenza, Human/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia/epidemiology , Registries , Risk Assessment
7.
Ann Ist Super Sanita ; 57(1): 7-17, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1167959

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: During epidemics, health care workers (HCWs) are particularly exposed to the risk of secondary trauma. If not effectively addressed, the consequences of such psychological distress can progress to more severe conditions. METHODS: A systematic search of several databases on the effect of SARS, MERS, and COVID-19 epidemics on the mental health of HCWs was performed according to both the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions and the WHO Rapid Review Guide for Health Policy and Systems Research. RESULTS: The 77 reviewed studies highlighted that work organization and individual characteristics can add to mental health risk. Providing adequate training to prevent infection and prepare HCWs to handle the epidemic, strengthening team work to improve organization, and ensuring appropriate protective equipment is available can help prevent risk of psychiatric illness. CONCLUSIONS: Monitoring and addressing through tailored interventions the mental health consequences of pandemics in HCWs is necessary.


Subject(s)
Epidemics , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Disorders/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/psychology , COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Risk Factors
8.
Clinics ; 76: e2641, 2021. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1160332

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: We aimed to analyze the vocal self-perception of Brazilian teachers and their communication needs, vocal signs and symptoms, and voice-related lifestyles during the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic and, based on this information, to develop guidance materials intended for dissemination to these teachers and the general community. METHODS: An online questionnaire designed for this survey was distributed via the researchers' networks and was available for completion by any teacher, except those who were not working at the time. There were 1,253 teachers from all over Brazil, of both sexes, covering a wide age range, working at different levels of education, and most with more than ten years of experience. Descriptive and inferential analyses of the data were performed. RESULTS: On comparing the prepandemic period with the current one, participants indicated voice improvements. In contrast, they presented symptoms such as dry throat, effort in addressing remote classes, hoarseness after classes, and difficulties with the use of headphones, among others. They further indicated stress, general fatigue, impact of the pandemic on mental health, and the overlapping of many home tasks with professional tasks. Some smoked, and others hydrated insufficiently. CONCLUSION: Although teachers generally noticed voice improvements during the pandemic, a proportion of them perceived worsening of voices. Many indicated several factors in which speech-language pathologists could guide them with the aim of improving performance and comfort during remote and hybrid classes, an initiative that will positively impact not only their voice and communication but also their quality of life.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Child , Voice Disorders/therapy , Voice Disorders/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections , Coronavirus , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Quality of Life , Self Concept , Speech Therapy , Voice Quality , Brazil , Communication , Pandemics , Betacoronavirus
10.
Am J Ind Med ; 64(4): 227-237, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1046876

ABSTRACT

The impact of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 permeates all aspects of society worldwide. Initial medical reports and media coverage have increased awareness of the risk imposed on healthcare workers in particular, during this pandemic. However, the health implications of COVID-19 for the global workforce are multifaceted and complex, warranting careful reflection and consideration to mitigate the adverse effects on workers worldwide. Accordingly, our review offers a framework for considering this topic, highlighting key issues, with the aim to prompt and inform action, including research, to minimize the occupational hazards imposed by this ongoing challenge. We address respiratory disease as a primary concern, while recognizing the multisystem spectrum of COVID-19-related disease and how clinical aspects are interwoven with broader socioeconomic forces.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Global Health , Occupational Diseases , Pandemics , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/economics , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/therapy , COVID-19 Testing/methods , Global Health/economics , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/economics , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , Occupational Health , Pandemics/economics , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Public Health Surveillance
11.
J Occup Environ Med ; 62(9): 692-699, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-975372

ABSTRACT

: COVID-19 illness can cause multiorgan illness. Some States have passed legislation granting a rebuttable presumption of causation by workplace exposure in certain occupations. This paper summarizes methodology for evaluating claimants utilizing known science and as well as information from the American Medical Association Guides resources.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/economics , Occupational Diseases/economics , Occupational Exposure , Pandemics/economics , Pneumonia, Viral/economics , Workers' Compensation/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/etiology , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Humans , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/etiology , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
13.
Work ; 67(1): 11-19, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused global adoption of stay-at-home mandates in an effort to curb viral spread. This lockdown has had the unintended consequence of decreasing physical activity, and incidence of low back pain (LBP) is likely to rise as sedentary behavior increases. OBJECTIVE: In this article, we aim to provide a fundamental, novel approach to alleviate LBP including desk worker associated LBP exacerbated during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Individuals can alleviate their LBP through a simplistic, self-therapeutic approach: myofascial release and stretching of key musculature involved in LBP following a simple technique and associated time domain, as well as a 360-degree strengthening of the muscles surrounding the lower back. Additional muscular strength will support the lower back and lend resilience to aid in the mitigation of pain caused by poor work-related postural positions. RESULTS: We demonstrate several exercises and movements aimed at alleviating LBP. Additionally, we provide a summary graphic which facilitates ease of use of the exercise plan and represents a novel methodology for simple distribution of evidence-based pain reduction strategies. CONCLUSIOS: Through mitigation of sedentary behavior and adoption of the techniques described herein, LBP can be decreased and, in some cases, cured.


Subject(s)
Low Back Pain/therapy , Massage , Muscle Stretching Exercises , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Resistance Training , Sedentary Behavior , Workplace/psychology , Back Muscles/physiopathology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Humans , Low Back Pain/physiopathology , Occupational Diseases/physiopathology , Pain Management/methods , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Telecommunications
14.
Br J Psychiatry ; 218(2): 75-76, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-890130

ABSTRACT

Besides a global health crisis, the COVID-19 pandemic has potential to have a severe and long-lasting psychological impact on frontline healthcare workers such as paramedics. It is imperative to shed light on these mental health issues and employ interventions to protect the mental wellness of this vulnerable group of healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Technicians/psychology , Mental Disorders/therapy , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Adult , Depressive Disorder/therapy , Humans , Mental Disorders/etiology , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/therapy , Psychological Trauma/therapy , Psychosocial Intervention , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Suicide/prevention & control
15.
Fam Process ; 59(3): 883-897, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-632698

ABSTRACT

The Witness to Witness Program (W2W), based on Weingarten's witnessing model (2000, 2003, 2004), began in July 2018 and originally was established to support healthcare workers and attorneys (our partners) who were experiencing empathic distress working with people involved in various stages of the detention process. The W2W program evolved to offer four primary components: clinician listening sessions geared to deep understanding of the person's story of their work and its challenges; an inventory of the person's current internal and external resources both in the present and in the past; help with removal of barriers to those resources; and development of a personal toolkit to handle stress. Additional services available to partners and their organizations included psycho-educational webinars, facilitated peer support groups, and organizational consultations to foster trauma-sensitive and resilience-hardy work environments. In March, after lockdowns due to the coronavirus pandemic, W2W pivoted to focus on handouts and webinars addressing how to cope with distress and moral injury, maintaining resilience, coping with grief, and dealing with multiple losses caused by the pandemic. Disaster sparked collaboration and innovation. A train the trainer model was developed to reach more community health workers providing services to the Latinx community dealing with losses similar to those experienced by the clients they serve. W2W continues to create virtual communities of support. In doing so we practice doing reasonable hope together (Weingarten, Family Process, 2010, 49, 5).


El "Programa de testigo a testigo" (Witness to Witness Program, W2W), basado en el modelo de testigos de Weingarten (2000, 2003, 2004), comenzó en julio de 2018 y se creó originalmente para apoyar a los trabajadores sanitarios y a los abogados (nuestros socios) que estaban sufriendo distrés empático al trabajar con personas implicadas en varias etapas del proceso de detención. El programa W2W evolucionó y ahora ofrece cuatro componentes principales: sesiones de escucha con el clínico orientadas a una comprensión profunda de la historia del trabajo de la persona y sus dificultades; un inventario de los recursos externos e internos actuales de la persona tanto en el presente como en el pasado; ayuda con la eliminación de obstáculos para acceder a esos recursos; y desarrollo de un conjunto de herramientas personales para manejar el estrés. Otros servicios disponibles para los socios y sus organizaciones fueron seminarios web psicoeducativos, grupos de autoayuda con facilitadores y consultas organizacionales para fomentar entornos de trabajo donde se priorice la sensibilidad al trauma y la resiliencia. En marzo, después de los confinamientos por la pandemia del coronavirus, el W2W dio un giro para centrarse en folletos y seminarios web que abordan cómo afrontar el distrés y el daño moral, mantener la resiliencia, afrontar el duelo y soportar numerosas pérdidas causadas por la pandemia. La catástrofe generó colaboración e innovación. Se desarrolló un modelo para capacitar a los capacitadores a fin de llegar a más trabajadores sanitarios de la comunidad que prestan servicios a la comunidad latina a la hora de afrontar pérdidas similares a las sufridas por los pacientes a quienes atienden. El W2W continúa creando comunidades virtuales de apoyo. Al hacerlo, ensayamos una esperanza razonable juntos (Weingarten, 2010b).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychotherapy/methods , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/therapy , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Female , Grief , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Program Evaluation , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology , United States/epidemiology , Workplace/psychology
18.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(S1): S243-S244, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-621892

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Spain ranked 1st in number of infected health workers. Despite the fact that up to 75% of them were women, psychological interventions to prevent distress usually lacked a gender perspective and a biopsychosocial approach. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Adaptation, Psychological , Coronavirus Infections , Health Personnel , Occupational Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Psychotherapy/standards , Stress Disorders, Traumatic , Women , Adult , COVID-19 , Female , Humans , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Spain , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/therapy
19.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(S1): S126-S127, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-616915

ABSTRACT

At this time, nurses within hospitals are working hard, but they potentially will have long-term mental health effects as a result of the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. Both short-term interventions, such as daily huddles and debriefings, and long-term interventions, including follow-ups on the mental health of nurses, need to be implemented to prevent mental disorders among nurses during and after the pandemic. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Mental Disorders/therapy , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Diseases/therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Adult , COVID-19 , Humans , Mental Disorders/prevention & control , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control
20.
Psychol Trauma ; 12(S1): S165-S167, 2020 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-596076

ABSTRACT

Institutions across the world are working to develop initiatives aimed at supporting the well-being of healthcare workers (HCWs) facing the psychological impacts of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. This Commentary identifies risks that HCWs are experiencing, reviews sources of fear and stress, and describes the implementation of a three-tiered model for the provision of emotional support and mental health services for clinical and nonclinical HCWs. The model recognizes the fluid, ever-evolving nature of the COVID-19 pandemic and includes proactive, visible, and easy-to-access supportive psychological services that expand the safety net and help address immediate and future mental health challenges of HCWs. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Behavioral Symptoms , Coronavirus Infections , Emotions , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health Services/organization & administration , Models, Organizational , Occupational Diseases , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Social Support , Adult , Behavioral Symptoms/diagnosis , Behavioral Symptoms/etiology , Behavioral Symptoms/therapy , COVID-19 , Humans , Occupational Diseases/diagnosis , Occupational Diseases/etiology , Occupational Diseases/therapy
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