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1.
Hypertension ; 76(5): 1368-1383, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2153222

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine allows the remote exchange of medical data between patients and healthcare professionals. It is used to increase patients' access to care and provide effective healthcare services at a distance. During the recent coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, telemedicine has thrived and emerged worldwide as an indispensable resource to improve the management of isolated patients due to lockdown or shielding, including those with hypertension. The best proposed healthcare model for telemedicine in hypertension management should include remote monitoring and transmission of vital signs (notably blood pressure) and medication adherence plus education on lifestyle and risk factors, with video consultation as an option. The use of mixed automated feedback services with supervision of a multidisciplinary clinical team (physician, nurse, or pharmacist) is the ideal approach. The indications include screening for suspected hypertension, management of older adults, medically underserved people, high-risk hypertensive patients, patients with multiple diseases, and those isolated due to pandemics or national emergencies.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Hypertension/drug therapy , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Blood Pressure Determination/methods , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Evidence-Based Medicine , Female , Humans , Hypertension/diagnosis , Italy , Male , Occupational Health , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Patient Safety , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Severity of Illness Index
2.
Front Public Health ; 10: 918784, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2154834

ABSTRACT

The impact of two years of the COVID-19 pandemic on the relationship between employers and employees are explored, including changing employee sensibilities with respect to future employment, work-life balance, remote and flexible work, and the great resignation. Lasting work changes induced by the pandemic expand employee empowerment and demand for greater work flexibility. Flexibility no longer provides employers a unique selling point and hiring/retention competitiveness - it has become an expected standard. Evolving workplace expectations are tied to realizations of the value of work within the broader context of employees' lives, changing business culture across many industries. Demand for increased work/employment individualization and personalization overlaps unprecedented personalization of and power of mobile technologies. Human-centered employee management in the post-COVID-19 era will become imperative, with many opportunities for employers to enable greater impact in employee wellness and health promotion driven by deploying compelling virtual-remote engagement and behavioral change technologies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment , Humans , Pandemics , Workplace
3.
Anesth Analg ; 132(1): 2-14, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140282

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic created an extraordinary demand for N95 and similarly rated filtering facepiece respirators (FFR) that remains unmet due to limited stock, production constraints, and logistics. Interest in decontamination and reuse of FFR, a product class designed for single use in health care settings, has undergone a parallel surge due to shortages. A worthwhile decontamination method must provide effective inactivation of the targeted pathogen(s), and preserve particle filtration, mask fit, and safety for a subsequent user. This discussion reviews the background of the current shortage, classification, structure, and functional aspects of FFR, and potentially effective decontamination methods along with reference websites for those seeking updated information and guidance. The most promising techniques utilize heat, hydrogen peroxide, microwave-generated steam, or ultraviolet light. Many require special or repurposed equipment and a detailed operational roadmap specific to each setting. While limited, research is growing. There is significant variation between models with regard to the ability to withstand decontamination yet remain protective. The number of times an individual respirator can be reused is often limited by its ability to maintain a tight fit after multiple uses rather than by the decontamination method itself. There is no single solution for all settings; each individual or institution must choose according to their need, capability, and available resources. As the current pandemic is expected to continue for months to years, and the possibility of future airborne biologic threats persists, the need for plentiful, effective respiratory protection is stimulating research and innovation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Decontamination , Equipment Contamination , Equipment Reuse , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Inhalation Exposure/prevention & control , N95 Respirators/virology , Occupational Exposure/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Humans , Inhalation Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Occupational Health , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors
4.
J Occup Health ; 64(1): e12373, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2127497

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The present study examined the relationship between health culture evaluated by the Health and Productivity Survey Sheets and the implementation status of infection control measures against COVID-19 in the workplace. METHODS: This was a cross-sectional study using the corporate data (2518 companies) collected for the purpose of selecting the excellent company of health and productivity management by the Japanese government. The explanatory variable was the overall evaluation score, and the outcome was whether or not infection control measures against COVID-19 in the workplace. We used logistic regression analysis and calculated the odds ratio adjusted for the industry sector, the corporation size, and the operating profit ratio by the overall evaluation score category. RESULTS: The odds ratio of all infection control measurements in the workplace increased as the evaluation score increased. CONCLUSIONS: This study revealed a new finding that the presence of a healthy culture in the workplace will lead to the appropriate implementation of infection control measures during a pandemic. The company's ordinary commitment to employee health will be effective even in times of health crisis, such as during the outbreak of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , Workplace , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Organizational Culture
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143002

ABSTRACT

This Special Issue of the IJERPH examines various psychosocial factors that influence the health of workers in contemporary workplaces [...].


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Workplace , Humans , Workplace/psychology
6.
Sangyo Eiseigaku Zasshi ; 64(6): 345-353, 2022 Nov 25.
Article in Japanese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2140865

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 has led to an increased use of online consultations in occupational health. We examined experience, satisfaction, and difficulties with online consultations during the first year after the COVID-19 pandemic by surveying a sample of workers. METHODS: An online survey was conducted in March 2021 among full-time employees of an online panel survey (E-COCO-J: The Employee Cohort Study on the COVID-19 Pandemic in Japan). Respondents were asked to report whether they had online or face-to-face consultations with occupational health professionals in the past year, their level of satisfaction, and their difficulties and problems related to the online consultations. RESULTS: Of the 1,153 respondents, 1,102 (excluding those who were unemployed or on leave) were included in the analysis. Fifty respondents had had online consultations in the past year and 57 had face-to-face consultations. The proportion of respondents who reported satisfaction with online consultations was high (more than 70%) for general health, follow-ups, and guidance consultations, among others. However, the proportion of satisfaction with online occupational consultations was low (less than 40%) for employees who worked long hours, or took leave or returned to work. Over 30% of the respondents indicated that the difficulties with online consultations were due to incongruence with their expectations ("I preferred a face-to-face consultation instead of an online one"), quality of communication ("I did not feel like I was able to consult sufficiently"), and concerns about confidentiality ("I was worried that someone could hear our conversation"). CONCLUSION: The experience of online consultations was similar to that of face-to-face consultations. Satisfaction with online occupational consultations for those who worked long hours and those who took leave or returned to work was low. In the online consultation for occupational health, the occupational health professional may be required to judge its suitability depending on type of the consultation and take necessary consideration and measures to maintain the quality of the online consultation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , Pandemics , Japan/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Personal Satisfaction , Cohort Studies , Referral and Consultation
7.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(10): 809-814, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2118085

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: This study clarifies potential misestimation of occupational risk caused by the dichotomy of frontline essential and nonessential occupations in prior studies. METHODS: The linear regression is used to investigate the occupational risk in terms of incidence rate, hospitalization, and mortality on community level during the pandemic. RESULTS: Overall, frontline essential occupations were positively associated with incidence rate, hospitalization, and mortality (156.06, 18.47, and 3.49; P < 0.01). Among essential occupations, however, education, training, and library occupations were negatively associated with them, whereas transportation, protective service, food preparation, and serving occupations were insignificantly associated with them. Moreover, among nonessential occupations, building and grounds cleaning, construction, and extraction occupations were positively associated with them. CONCLUSION: The dichotomy of frontline essential and nonessential occupations can bring overestimation and underestimation of occupational risk during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Policy , Humans , Occupations , Pandemics
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 21.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2116203

ABSTRACT

There is widespread recognition that the world of work is changing, and agreement is growing that the occupational safety and health (OSH) field must change to contribute to the protection of workers now and in the future. Discourse on the evolution of OSH has been active for many decades, but formalized support of an expanded focus for OSH has greatly increased over the past 20 years. Development of approaches such as the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH)'s Total Worker Health® concept and the World Health Organization (WHO)'s Healthy Workplace Framework are concrete examples of how OSH can incorporate a new focus with a wider view. In 2019, NIOSH initiated a multi-year effort to explore an expanded focus for OSH. This paper is a report on the outputs of a three-year cooperative agreement between NIOSH and The University of Texas School of Public Health, which led to subject matter expert workshops in 2020 and an international conference of global interest groups in 2021. This article traces the background of these meetings and identifies and assesses the lessons learned. It also reviews ten thematic topics that emerged from the meetings: worker health inequalities; training new OSH professionals; future OSH research and practice; tools to measure well-being of workers; psychosocial hazards and adverse mental health effects; skilling, upskilling and improving job quality; socioeconomic influences; climate change; COVID-19 pandemic influences; and strategic foresight. Cross-cutting these themes is the need for systems and transdisciplinary thinking and operationalization of the concept of well-being to prepare the OSH field for the work of the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , United States , Humans , Occupational Health/education , Pandemics/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Workplace , Public Health
9.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(22)2022 Nov 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2110081

ABSTRACT

The purpose of the research paper is to analyse the factors affecting remote work in terms of the selected socio-economic criteria and to determine which elements contribute the most to the development of sustainable work. In addition, the study describes the issues of remote education at the academic level and the challenges faced by academic teachers during the COVID-19 pandemic. The whole is embedded in the issues of occupational health and safety, with particular emphasis on the psychosocial aspects of the occupational safety of academic teachers in Poland. In the research process, the TOPSIS multi-criteria analysis tool (technique for order of preference by similarity to ideal solution) was used, as well as AHP (analytical hierarchy process), as an auxiliary method. The use of these methods made it possible to select the most important variable and to determine the ranking of factors affecting the analysed problem. Findings: According to the conducted research, the most important factor affecting the safety of remote work-in relation to the selected sustainability criteria-is overwork/workload. An equally important element was stress during remote work, as well as the organization of time, with consideration to the balance between work and home duties. The research has shown that the selected aspects of remote work can have a significant impact on the achievement of sustainable development goals by a given organization, and in relation to individuals, on the quality of life and the sense of safety and health at work.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , Sustainable Development , Quality of Life , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology
10.
Niger Postgrad Med J ; 29(4): 303-309, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2100052

ABSTRACT

Background: Every workplace has got hazards in many different forms, ranging from sharps, falling objects, chemicals, infections, noise and a lot of other potentially dangerous situations. The occupational safety and health administration mandates employers to protect their employees from such potentially dangerous workplace hazards. Personal protective equipment (PPE) plays an important role in preventing and ensuring health safety amongst industrial workers. This study aimed to determine the use of PPE and rules compliance amongst Industrial Workers in Kano State. Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used to assess 150 workers selected from the Sharada Industrial Estate, Kano, Nigeria, using a multistage sampling technique. Data were obtained using semi-structured interviewer-administered questionnaires and analysed using SPSS version 22.0. Results: The response rate was 88.2%, and the mean age of respondents was 28.1 ± 7.4. About 72% were male, 74.7% had secondary education and 16.4% reported ever having a child with a congenital anomaly. Up to 25% reported using PPE always, 62% used PPE occasionally and 12% never used PPE. Factors significantly associated with the use of PPE at bivariate level were: Gender, 'provision of statutory regulation by the management', 'provision of PPE on worksite' and 'provision of training to staff' respectively. However, on multivariable regression analysis, only 'provision of statutory regulation by the management' and 'provision of PPE on worksite' were found to be independent (intrinsic) predictors of the use of PPE. Conclusions: Training alone does not necessarily increase the uptake of PPE amongst industrial workers. There is a need to ensure the availability of PPE at the worksite, as well as statutory regulations by industries.


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Personal Protective Equipment , Female , Humans , Male , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Nigeria , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(21)2022 Oct 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2090173

ABSTRACT

The continuous transformation process in the world of work, intensified by the COVID-19 pandemic, is giving employees more scope to shape their own work. This scope can be experienced as a burden or as a resource for employees. Work design competencies (WDC) describe employees' experience of their scope for design. Our study draws on existing datasets based on two Germany-wide studies. We used hierarchical cluster analyses to examine patterns between WDC, the age of employees (range: 18-71 years), the amount of weekly work time working from home (WFH), and work ability. In total, the data of N = 1232 employees were analyzed, and 735 of them participated in Study 1. To test the validity of the clusters, we analyzed data from N = 497 employees in Study 2. In addition, a split-half validation was performed with the data from Study 1. In both studies, three clusters emerged that differed in age and work ability. The cluster with the highest mean of WDC comprised employees that were on average older and reported a higher mean of work ability. Regarding WFH, no clear patterns emerged. The results and further theoretical and practical implications are discussed. Overall, WDC appear to be relevant to work ability and, in a broader sense, to occupational health, and are related to sociodemographic factors such as age.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , Adolescent , Young Adult , Adult , Middle Aged , Aged , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Germany , Cluster Analysis
16.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1294, 2022 Oct 27.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089193

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has had various impacts on businesses and workers worldwide. The spread of infection has been reported through cluster outbreaks in the workplace, and World Health Organization has emphasized workplace infection control measures. Occupational physicians (OPs) are expected to actively support employers' efforts to minimize the damage of the pandemic. However, there is little research on the role of these specialists during a pandemic. Clarification of the contributions of OPs to health and safety at the workplace in the COVID-19 pandemic would be beneficial to ensure that OPs can be effectively deployed in the next pandemic. METHODS: We employed semi-structured interviews and qualitative content analysis of the interview transcripts. Twenty OPs were selected as priority candidates from among 600 OPs certificated of the JSOH, and thirteen who met the eligibility criteria agreed to participate. The online interviews were conducted in November and December 2020 with thirteen OPs. We extracted meaning units (MUs) from interview transcripts according to the research question: "What was the role of OP in the COVID-19 pandemic?" and condensed and abstracted them into codes and categorized them. Validity was confirmed by additional 5 OPs interviews. RESULTS: A total of 503 MUs were extracted from the transcripts. These were abstracted into 10 sub-categories and two categories. Categories 1 and 2 dealt with "Role in confronting the direct effects of the pandemic" and "Role in confronting the indirect effects of the pandemic" and accounted for 434 (86.3%) and 69 (13.7%) MUs, respectively. These results were validated by another 5 interviews. CONCLUSION: This study identified the role of OPs in Japan in the COVID-19 pandemic. The results showed that they made a wide range of contributions to the direct and indirect effects of the pandemic. We hope our findings will help OPs during future pandemics or other long-term emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Physicians , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Workplace , Japan/epidemiology , Qualitative Research
17.
New Solut ; 32(3): 171-181, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2089089

ABSTRACT

This article follows two entertainment industry COVID-19 worker safety programs from inception through implementation. The first plan was developed by the four major film industry unions in concert with their expert consultants. The second plan for live theater was initiated by the Broadway League, a national trade association for the theater owners, operators, producers, presenters, and general managers in North American cities and their suppliers of goods and services. The efficacy of the plans to provide cast and crew with proper industrial hygiene measures such as ventilation and protective masks is compared by the author.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , Humans , COVID-19/prevention & control , Industry
18.
Iran J Immunol ; 18(1): 82-92, 2021 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067500

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) rapidly transmits in general population, mainly between health-care workers (HCWs) who are in close contact with patients. OBJECTIVE: To study the seropositivity of HCWs as a high-risk group compared to general population. METHODS: 72 samples were obtained from HCWs working in Masih Daneshvari hospital as one of the main COVID-19 admission centers in Tehran, during April 4 to 6, 2020. Also we collected 2021 blood samples from general population. The SARS-CoV-2 specific IgM, and IgG antibodies in the collected serum specimens were measured by commercial ELISA kits. RESULTS: Based on the clinical manifestations, 25.0%, 47.2%, and 27.8% of HCWs were categorized as symptomatic with typical symptoms, symptomatic with atypical symptoms, and asymptomatic, respectively. Symptomatic individuals with typical and atypical symptoms were 63.2% and 36.8% positive in RT-PCR test, respectively. Anti-SARS-CoV-2 IgM and IgG antibodies were detected in 15.3% and 27.8% of HCWs samples, respectively. Antibody testing in the general population indicated that SARS-CoV-2 specific IgM and IgG were found in (162/2021) 8%, and (290/2021) 14.4%, respectively. The frequency of positive cases of IgM and IgG were significantly increased in HCWs compared to general population (p= 0.028 for IgM and p= 0.002 for IgG). CONCLUSION: The frequency of SARS-CoV-2 specific antibodies in HCWs was higher than general population indicating a higher viral transmission via close exposure with COVID-19 patients.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19 Serological Testing , COVID-19/diagnosis , Health Personnel , Occupational Health , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , Adult , Aged , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Exposure , Predictive Value of Tests , Risk Factors , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Time Factors , Young Adult
19.
Front Public Health ; 10: 951760, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055091

ABSTRACT

The core objective of this study is to examine the impact of less social connectedness and testing fear on employee health. This study also investigates the mediating role of psychological strain between the relationship of less social connectedness, testing fear and employee health. Furthermore, this study also assesses the impact of employee health on employee performance. The study's target audience consisted of employees in the electronics industry in China. The convenience sample method was used in this study to collect data from respondents. Data analysis of this study was performed by using the structural equation modeling technique. The statistical software used for data analysis is Smart PLS 3. The results of this study show that less COVID-19 testing fear has a negatively significant impact on employee health, but less social connectedness has not significant direct impact on employee health. Furthermore, psychological strain was discovered to mediate the relationship between less social connectedness and employee health and testing fear and employee health. In addition, this impact of employee health on employee performance was found significant. This study provides theoretical and practical implications. In the context of practical implications, this study provides valuable insights for the organizational management to develop a healthy and positive working environment and adopt healthy behavior among their employees which ultimately foster their job performance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Health , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19 Testing , Fear , Humans , Workplace
20.
Clin Infect Dis ; 75(Supplement_2): S216-S224, 2022 Oct 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051345

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Surveillance systems lack detailed occupational exposure information from workers with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health partnered with 6 states to collect information from adults diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 infection who worked in person (outside the home) in non-healthcare settings during the 2 weeks prior to illness onset. METHODS: The survey captured demographic, medical, and occupational characteristics and work- and non-work-related risk factors for SARS-CoV-2 infection. Reported close contact with a person known or suspected to have SARS-CoV-2 infection was categorized by setting as exposure at work, exposure outside of work only, or no known exposure/did not know. Frequencies and percentages of exposure types are compared by respondent characteristics and risk factors. RESULTS: Of 1111 respondents, 19.4% reported exposure at work, 23.4% reported exposure outside of work only, and 57.2% reported no known exposure/did not know. Workers in protective service occupations (48.8%) and public administration industries (35.6%) reported exposure at work most often. More than one third (33.7%) of respondents who experienced close contact with ≥10 coworkers per day and 28.8% of respondents who experienced close contact with ≥10 customers/clients per day reported exposures at work. CONCLUSIONS: Exposure to occupational SARS-CoV-2 was common among respondents. Examining differences in exposures among different worker groups can help identify populations with the greatest need for prevention interventions. The benefits of recording employment characteristics as standard demographic information will remain relevant as new and reemerging public health issues occur.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Exposure , Occupational Health , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Exposure/adverse effects , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
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