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2.
Glob Health Res Policy ; 6(1): 36, 2021 09 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440961

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The highly contagious nature of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) places physicians in South Asia at high risk of contracting the infection. Accordingly, we conducted this study to provide an updated account of physician deaths in South Asia during the COVID-19 pandemic and to analyze and compare the different characteristics associated with physician mortality amongst the countries of the region. METHODS: We performed a cross-sectional study by using published news reports on the websites of news agencies from 9 selected countries in South Asia. Our study included only those physicians and doctors who died after contracting COVID-19 from their respective workplaces. All available data about the country of origin, type of, sex, age, medical or surgical specialty, and date of death were included. RESULTS: The total number of physician deaths reported due to COVID-19 in our study was 170, with half (87/170, 51%) of the deaths reported from Iran. Male physician deaths were reported to be 145 (145/170 = 85%). Internal Medicine (58.43%) was the most severely affected sub-specialty. The highest physician mortality rate in the general population recorded in Afghanistan (27/1000 deaths). General physicians from India [OR = 11.00(95% CI = 1.06-114.08), p = 0.045] and public sector medical practitioners from Pakistan [aOR = 4.52 (95% CI = 1.18-17.33), p = 0.028] were showing significant mortality when compared with other regions in multivariate logistic regression. CONCLUSION: An increased number of physician deaths, owing to COVID-19, has been shown in South Asia. This could be due to decreased personal protective equipment and the poor health care management systems of the countries in the region to combat the pandemic. Future studies should provide detailed information of characteristics associated with physician mortalities along with the main complications arising due to the virus.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , Mortality , Occupational Diseases/mortality , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Physicians/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Afghanistan/epidemiology , Aged , Bangladesh/epidemiology , Bhutan/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Global Health/statistics & numerical data , Humans , India/epidemiology , Indian Ocean Islands/epidemiology , Iran/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Nepal/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Pakistan/epidemiology , Sri Lanka/epidemiology
3.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12273, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406069

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: It is unclear how many workplace COVID-19 preventive measures were maintained during repeated outbreaks. The aim of this study was to investigate a longitudinal change of implementation of workplace preventive measures responding to COVID-19 in Japan. METHODS: An online longitudinal study was conducted using a cohort of full-time employees in Japan, starting in March 2020 (T1), with follow-up surveys in May (T2), August (T3), and November (T4) 2020. A repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the difference among the four surveys in the mean number of 23 predetermined items of the measures implemented. RESULTS: The final sample comprised 800 employees. The mean number of the implemented measures increased from T1 to T2, but did not change from T2 to T3, then decreased from T3 to T4. The number of workplace preventive measures significantly increased from T1 to T2 for 21 items (P < .001), and significantly decreased from T3 to T4 for 14 items (P < .001 to P = .005). CONCLUSIONS: While the preventive measures responding to COVID-19 in the workplace were well-implemented during the earlier phase of the outbreak, they seem to have been relaxed after a huge outbreak (T3 to T4: August to November 2020). Workplaces should be encouraged to continue the preventive measures over repeated outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Communicable Disease Control/statistics & numerical data , Health Plan Implementation/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Workplace/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Disease Outbreaks , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Follow-Up Studies , Humans , Japan , Longitudinal Studies , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/virology , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
4.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0249143, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1394536

ABSTRACT

Pork processing plants were apparent hotspots for SARS-CoV2 in the spring of 2020. As a result, the swine industry was confronted with a major occupational health, financial, and animal welfare crisis. The objective of this work was to describe the epidemiological situation within processing plants, develop mathematical models to simulate transmission in these plants, and test the effectiveness of routine PCR screening at minimizing SARS-CoV2 circulation. Cumulative incidence of clinical (PCR-confirmed) disease plateaued at ~2.5% to 25% across the three plants studied here. For larger outbreaks, antibody prevalence was approximately 30% to 40%. Secondly, we developed a mathematical model that accounts for asymptomatic, pre-symptomatic, and background "community" transmission. By calibrating this model to observed epidemiological data, we estimated the initial reproduction number (R) of the virus. Across plants, R generally ranged between 2 and 4 during the initial phase, but subsequently declined to ~1 after two to three weeks, most likely as a result of implementation/compliance with biosecurity measures in combination with population immunity. Using the calibrated model to simulate a range of possible scenarios, we show that the effectiveness of routine PCR-screening at minimizing disease spread was far more influenced by testing frequency than by delays in results, R, or background community transmission rates. Testing every three days generally averted about 25% to 40% of clinical cases across a range of assumptions, while testing every 14 days typically averted 7 to 13% of clinical cases. However, the absolute number of additional clinical cases expected and averted was influenced by whether there was residual immunity from a previous peak (i.e., routine testing is implemented after the workforce had experienced an initial outbreak). In contrast, when using PCR-screening to prevent outbreaks or in the early stages of an outbreak, even frequent testing may not prevent a large outbreak within the workforce. This research helps to identify protocols that minimize risk to occupational safety and health and support continuity of business for U.S. processing plants. While the model was calibrated to meat processing plants, the structure of the model and insights about testing are generalizable to other settings where large number of people work in close proximity.


Subject(s)
Algorithms , COVID-19/diagnosis , Food-Processing Industry , Mass Screening/methods , Models, Theoretical , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Pork Meat , Animals , Antibodies, Viral/immunology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Nucleic Acid Testing/methods , Humans , Polymerase Chain Reaction/methods , Reproducibility of Results , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , SARS-CoV-2/immunology , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Sensitivity and Specificity , Swine
6.
Int J Circumpolar Health ; 80(1): 1959700, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1352067

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study is to identify how managers of micro-sized enterprises experience the impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on their business operations, work-life balance and well-being. Further, the study aims to make comparisons between managers of micro-sized businesses and managers of small-sized businesses. This mixed-method study is based on qualitative interviews with ten managers of micro-sized enterprises and a questionnaire answered by 95 managers of micro-sized and small-sized enterprises in regions in the north of Sweden. Managers of micro-sized enterprises reported significantly worse scores for mental well-being, job satisfaction and life satisfaction in comparison with managers of small-sized enterprises. Three themes emerged from the qualitative analysis: Changed leadership role, Impact on private life and Impact on well-being. In the interviews, the managers of micro-sized enterprises reported that the pandemic had increased their workload and forced them to mobilise strategies for enterprise survival. This study indicates that managers of micro-sized enterprises had changed their leadership role and increased their workload and number of work tasks, including supporting the employees, developing strategies for business survival and applying for governmental support. However, the managers demonstrated creativity in finding new solutions for their enterprises.


Subject(s)
Administrative Personnel/psychology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Entrepreneurship/statistics & numerical data , Small Business/organization & administration , Work-Life Balance , Workload/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health Services/organization & administration , Sweden
7.
PLoS One ; 16(7): e0254920, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1315894

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: We evaluated measures to protect healthcare workers (HCWs) in Vancouver, Canada, where variants of concern (VOC) went from <1% VOC in February 2021 to >92% in mid-May. Canada has amongst the longest periods between vaccine doses worldwide, despite Vancouver having the highest P.1 variant rate outside Brazil. METHODS: With surveillance data since the pandemic began, we tracked laboratory-confirmed SARS-CoV-2 infections, positivity rates, and vaccine uptake in all 25,558 HCWs in Vancouver Coastal Health, by occupation and subsector, and compared to the general population. Cox regression modelling adjusted for age and calendar-time calculated vaccine effectiveness (VE) against SARS-CoV-2 in fully vaccinated (≥ 7 days post-second dose), partially vaccinated infection (after 14 days) and unvaccinated HCWs; we also compared with unvaccinated community members of the same age-range. FINDINGS: Only 3.3% of our HCWs became infected, mirroring community rates, with peak positivity of 9.1%, compared to 11.8% in the community. As vaccine coverage increased, SARS-CoV-2 infections declined significantly in HCWs, despite a surge with predominantly VOC; unvaccinated HCWs had an infection rate of 1.3/10,000 person-days compared to 0.89 for HCWs post first dose, and 0.30 for fully vaccinated HCWs. VE compared to unvaccinated HCWs was 37.2% (95% CI: 16.6-52.7%) 14 days post-first dose, 79.2% (CI: 64.6-87.8%) 7 days post-second dose; one dose provided significant protection against infection until at least day 42. Compared with community infection rates, VE after one dose was 54.7% (CI: 44.8-62.9%); and 84.8% (CI: 75.2-90.7%) when fully vaccinated. INTERPRETATION: Rigorous droplet-contact precautions with N95s for aerosol-generating procedures are effective in preventing occupational infection in HCWs, with one dose of mRNA vaccination further reducing infection risk despite VOC and transmissibility concerns. Delaying second doses to allow more widespread vaccination against severe disease, with strict public health, occupational health and infection control measures, has been effective in protecting the healthcare workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Canada , Humans , Polymorphism, Genetic
8.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(6): 528-531, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1288155

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care workers (HCWs) experience increased occupational risk of contracting COVID-19, with temporal trends that might inform surveillance. METHODS: We analyzed data from a Veterans Affairs hospital-based COVID-19 worker telephone hotline collected over 40 weeks (2020). We calculated the proportion of COVID-19+ cases among persons-under-investigation (PUIs) for illness compared to rates from a nearby large university-based health care institution. RESULTS: We observed 740 PUIs, 65 (8.8%) COVID-19+. Time trends were similar at the study and comparison hospitals; only for the first of 10 four-week observation periods was the ratio for observed to expected COVID-19+ significant (P < 0.001). DISCUSSION: These data suggest that employee health COVID-19+ to PUI ratios could be utilized as a barometer of community trends. Pooling experience among heath care facilities may yield insights into occupational infectious disease outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/diagnosis , Cohort Studies , Hospitals, University , Hospitals, Veterans , Humans , Incidence , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , San Francisco/epidemiology , Sentinel Surveillance
9.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211026409, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1282203

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 has been spreading across the world since December 2019. The pandemic has created tremendous fear of death from infection and awful psychological pressure on healthcare professionals (HCPs). The measures of psychological effects of the COVID-19 outbreak on the Bangladeshi HCPs are unknown. The present study aimed to assess the mental health outcomes of Bangladeshi HCPs and associated risk factors. We conducted this cross-sectional study from July 15 to September 20, 2020. A total of 355 HCPs aged between 20 and 60 years residing in Bangladesh participated in this study. All the participants completed a self-administered questionnaire through Google Forms consisting of socio-demographic characteristics and mental health outcomes. We measure loneliness, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance using the UCLA loneliness scale-8, patient health questionnaire-9, 7-item generalized anxiety disorder scale, Pittsburgh sleep quality index. The present study observed the prevalence of loneliness, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbance among HCPs were 89%, 44%, 78%, and 87%, respectively. The factors significantly associated with the development of mental health problems among HCPs were working environment, economic condition, education level, area of residence, marital status, gender differences, professional category, body mass index, and smoking habit. Moreover, we have seen significant correlations among the different mental health outcomes. In Bangladesh, a large portion of HCPs reported mental health issues during the COVID-19 pandemic. COVID-19 pandemic incredibly impacted the psychological health of Bangladeshi healthcare professionals. Appropriate supportive programs and interventional initiatives might help the HCPs with mental health problems during and after this pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , Bangladesh/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/physiopathology , Depression/psychology , Female , Humans , Loneliness/psychology , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/physiopathology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
10.
Sci Prog ; 104(2): 368504211026121, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1277844

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the psychological well-being of healthcare professionals, among them, on medical and nursing occupational specialists. This study describes the psychological distress that this group has suffered, analyzing the effect that the sense of coherence related with the history of contact with infected people has generated in their mental health. Cross-sectional descriptive study using online questionnaires. Data were collected on a sample of 499 subjects, representing 42.0% and 38.8% of the associations of specialists in Occupational Medicine and Nursing, respectively. A univariate data analysis, independence test, and the CHAID multivariate method were carried out. The percentage of workers with high psychological distress was higher among women than among men; this was also higher in public sector workers than in the private sector. No differences have been observed regarding psychological distress and educational level, coexistence, having children, working away from home, having a pet, or between being a physician or nurse. The most efficient measure to prevent psychological distress was acting regarding the comprehensibility dimension of the sense of coherence. Sex, contact with any infected person, age, living as a couple, working in public or private centers, the availability of diagnostic tests, and the correlation with the manageability dimension were modulating factors. Sense of coherence is an effective measure to prevent psychological distress due to contact with people affected by COVID-19 in Occupational Health professionals.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Psychological Distress , Sense of Coherence , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Adult , Anxiety/physiopathology , Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Spain/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/physiopathology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e929454, 2021 Jun 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1278721

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) broke out in China. This study was to investigate the situation of mental health status among medical staff following COVID-19. MATERIAL AND METHODS A cross-sectional study was conducted through structured questionnaires to collect the demographical information of the participating medical staff via WeChat following COVID-19 crisis. The Center for Epidemiologic Studies-Depression Scale (CES-D), impact of events scale revised (IES-R), and Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index (PSQI) scale were used to evaluate depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms, and sleep quality, respectively. 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated. RESULTS A total of 597 medical staff's information was included for the statistical analysis, and found 45.23% of subjects had PTSD symptoms, the mean PSQI score was 6.320±3.587. The results of multivariable analysis implied that medical workers who did not participate in the Hubei aid program (ß=4.128; 95% CI, 0.983-7.272; P=0.010) and PTSD symptoms (ß=7.212; 95% CI, 4.807-9.616; P<0.001) were associated with a higher tendency to depression. The PSQI score was linearly related to the CES-D score (ß=1.125; 95% CI, 0.804-1.445; P<0.001). Subgroup analysis showed that medical workers who did not participate in the Hubei aid program, no traumatic experience before COVID-19 outbreaks, and PTSD symptoms may affect the tendency to depression in females, but not in males. PSQI score was linearly related to the CES-D score both in males and females. CONCLUSIONS The medical staff with PTSD symptoms and higher PSQI score may have a higher tendency to depression following COVID-19 outbreaks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depression , Medical Staff , Sleep Wake Disorders , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Medical Staff/psychology , Medical Staff/statistics & numerical data , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Sex Factors , Sleep Wake Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Wake Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Wake Disorders/etiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Am J Ind Med ; 64(7): 551-566, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1231845

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This article reports the results of a rapid scoping review of the literature on COVID-19 transmission risk to workers in essential sectors such as retail, health care, manufacturing, and agriculture, and more particularly the experiences of workers in precarious employment and social situations. METHODS: Following scoping review methods, we included 30 studies that varied in terms of methodology and theoretical approaches. The search included peer-reviewed articles and grey literature published between March and September 2020. RESULTS: Based on the studies reviewed, we found that COVID-19 infection and death rates increased not only with age and comorbidities, but also with discrimination and structural inequities based on racism and sexism. Racial and ethnic minority workers, including migrant workers, are concentrated in high-risk occupations and this concentration is correlated to lower socioeconomic conditions. The COVID-19 pandemic appears in the occupational health and safety spotlight as an exacerbator of already existing socioeconomic inequalities and social inequalities in health, especially in light of the intersection of issues related to racism, ethnic minority status, and sexism. CONCLUSIONS: This review provides early evidence about the limitations of institutions' responses to the pandemic, and their capacity to provide a safe and decent working environment for all workers, regardless of their employment status or the social protections they may enjoy under normal circumstances. It is also important to think about these issues in the postpandemic context, when conditions of precariousness and vulnerability persist and possibly worsen.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Disease Transmission, Infectious/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Diseases/virology , Occupational Exposure/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2
13.
New Solut ; 31(2): 113-124, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221723

ABSTRACT

Women make up the large majority of workers in global supply chains, especially factories in the apparel supply chain. These workers face significant inequalities in wages, workplace hazards, and a special burden of gender-based violence and harassment. These "normal" conditions have been compounded by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, which has exacerbated long-standing structural inequities. Decades of well-financed "corporate social responsibility" programs have failed because they do not address the underlying causes of illegal and abusive working conditions. New initiatives in the past half-decade offer promise in putting the needs and rights of workers front and center. Occupational health and safety professionals can assist in the global effort to improve working and social conditions, and respect for the rights and dignity of women workers, through advocacy and action on the job, in their professional associations, and in society at large.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clothing , Manufacturing Industry/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupations/statistics & numerical data , Women , Workplace , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Pandemics , Poverty/statistics & numerical data , Salaries and Fringe Benefits/statistics & numerical data , Sexual Harassment/statistics & numerical data , Violence/statistics & numerical data , Women's Rights/statistics & numerical data , Women's Rights/trends
14.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12224, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1217340

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Little is known about workplace measures against coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) in Japan during the winter of 2020, especially in micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs). This study aimed to provide an overview of the current situation of anti-COVID-19 measures in Japanese enterprises during the winter, considering company size. METHODS: This study was an Internet-based nationwide cross-sectional study. Individuals who were registered as full-time workers were invited to participate in the survey. Data were collected using an online self-administered questionnaire in December 2020. The chi-squared test for trend was performed to calculate the P-value for trend for each workplace measure across company sizes. RESULTS: For the 27 036 participants, across company sizes, the most prevalent workplace measure was encouraging mask wearing at work, followed by requesting that employees refrain from going to work when ill and restricting work-related social gatherings and entertainment. These measures were implemented by approximately 90% of large-scale enterprises and by more than 40% of micro- and small-scale enterprises. In contrast, encouraging remote working was implemented by less than half of large-scale enterprises and by around 20% of micro- and small-scale enterprises. There were statistically significant differences in all workplace measures by company size (all P < .001). CONCLUSIONS: We found that various responses to COVID-19 had been taken in workplaces. However, some measures, including remote working, were still not well-implemented, especially in smaller enterprises. The findings suggest that occupational health support for MSMEs is urgently needed to mitigate the current wave of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Health Promotion/organization & administration , Occupational Health Services/organization & administration , Workplace/organization & administration , Adult , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Japan , Male , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data
15.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 33(2): 101-107, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic may adversely impact the mental health of health care workers (HCWs). To address this issue, it is essential to determine levels of anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress, and sources of stress, and to identify subgroups of HCWs at a higher risk of adverse mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of symptoms of mental illness in HCWs in the area surrounding Detroit, Michigan. The online survey included questions about demographics, health and clinical factors, and sources of stress. Several tools were used to assess psychiatric symptoms among HCWs, including the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item assessment, and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5. The adequacy of personal protective equipment, patient resources, and training for highly contagious diseases were rated. RESULTS: The sample (N = 129) was predominantly female (51.2%) and White (65.9%), with 30.2% screening positive for clinical follow-up to assess anxiety, 20.9% for moderate to severe depression, and 16.3% for elevated traumatic stress. Differences were found by self-reported psychiatric diagnosis and chronic conditions, and role on treatment teams. CONCLUSIONS: Frontline HCWs demonstrate high levels of stress and trauma symptoms. Timely screening and accommodations may be needed during health care crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Occupational Stress , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Michigan/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
16.
Esc. Anna Nery Rev. Enferm ; 24(spe): e20200241, 20200000. graf
Article in Portuguese | LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-1127850

ABSTRACT

Objetivos: apresentar o número de profissionais de saúde acometidos pela COVID-19 no Brasil, identificar algumas medidas de controle para redução da vulnerabilidade e as repercussões sobre a saúde desses profissionais no enfrentamento da pandemia COVID-19. Método: implementado estudo descritivo, tendo como fonte boletins epidemiológicos e o Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Resultados: 22 estados brasileiros informam casos da COVID-19 entre os profissionais de saúde, totalizando 181.886. Dentre todas as capitais do país, 12 trazem informações. Algumas medidas recomendadas são: controle de engenharia, segurança, administrativas, práticas de segurança no trabalho e equipamentos de proteção individual. As repercussões envolvem saúde mental com implicações psíquicas, transtornos psicológicos e psiquiátricos. Conclusão e implicações para a prática: a pandemia desvelou, de forma crua e inequívoca, o retrato das condições de trabalho desigual, segregacionista e nefasto para a saúde humana a que os profissionais de saúde estão expostos, clama por mudanças e reconhecimentos e urge para a valorização desse grupo profissional


Objectives: to present the number of health professionals affected by COVID-19 in Brazil, to identify some control measures to reduce vulnerability and the health repercussions of these professionals in facing the COVID-19 pandemic. Method: a descriptive study was implemented, using epidemiological bulletins and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention as a source. Results: 22 Brazilian states report cases of COVID-19 among health professionals, totaling 181,886. Among all the capitals of the country, 12 bring information. Some recommended measures are: engineering control, safety, administrative, work safety practices and individual protective equipment. The repercussions involve mental health with psychic implications, psychological and psychiatric disorders. Conclusion and implications for the practice: the pandemic has revealed, in a raw and unequivocal way, the picture of unequal, segregationist and harmful working conditions for human health to which health professionals are exposed, calls for changes and recognition and urge for the valorization of this professional group


Objetivos: presentar el número de profesionales de la salud afectados por COVID-19 en Brasil, identificar algunas medidas de control para reducir la vulnerabilidad y las repercusiones en la salud de estos profesionales en el enfrentamiento a la pandemia del COVID-19. Método: se implementó un estudio descriptivo, utilizando como fuente boletines epidemiológicos y los Centros para el Control y la Prevención de Enfermedades. Resultados: Veintidós estados brasileños informan casos de COVID-19 entre los profesionales de la salud, totalizando 181.886. Entre todas las capitales del país, 12 traen información. Algunas medidas recomendadas son: control de ingeniería, seguridad, administrativas, prácticas de seguridad en el trabajo y equipo de protección individual. Las repercusiones se refieren a la salud mental con implicaciones psíquicas, trastornos psicológicos y psiquiátricos. Conclusión e implicaciones para la práctica: la pandemia ha develado de manera cruda e inequívoca, el retrato de las condiciones laborales desiguales, segregacionistas y nefastas para la salud humana a las que están expuestos los profesionales de la salud y exige cambios y reconocimiento, porque es urgente la valorización de este colectivo profesional


Subject(s)
Humans , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/epidemiology , Working Conditions , Brazil/epidemiology , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution
17.
J Occup Health ; 63(1): e12209, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1118074

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The COVID-19 pandemic has caused devastating damage to employment globally, particularly among the non-standard workforce. The objective of this study was to identify the effects of the pandemic on the employment status and lives of working students in Japan. METHODS: The Labour Force Survey (January 2019 to May 2020) was used to examine changes in students' work situations. In addition, to investigate the economic and health conditions of university students during the pandemic, the Student Lifestyle Survey was conducted in late May 2020. This survey asked students at a national university in Tokyo about recent changes in their studies, work, and lives. RESULTS: The number of working students reported in the Labour Force Survey has declined sharply since March 2020, falling by 780,000 (46%) in April. According to a survey of university students' living conditions, 37% were concerned about living expenses and tuition fees, and a higher percentage of students who were aware of financial insecurity had poor self-rated health. CONCLUSION: Nearly half of working students have lost their jobs during the pandemic in Japan, which has affected their lives, studies, and health. There is a need to monitor the impact of economic insecurity on students' studies and health over time, and to expand the safety net for disadvantaged students.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Employment/psychology , Life Style , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Students/psychology , Adaptation, Psychological , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Employment/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Japan , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Students/statistics & numerical data , Work-Life Balance , Young Adult
18.
MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly Rep ; 70(7): 250-253, 2021 Feb 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1089244

ABSTRACT

Certain hazard controls, including physical barriers, cloth face masks, and other personal protective equipment (PPE), are recommended to reduce coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) transmission in the workplace (1). Evaluation of occupational hazard control use for COVID-19 prevention can identify inadequately protected workers and opportunities to improve use. CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health used data from the June 2020 SummerStyles survey to characterize required and voluntary use of COVID-19-related occupational hazard controls among U.S. non-health care workers. A survey-weighted regression model was used to estimate the association between employer provision of hazard controls and voluntary use, and stratum-specific adjusted risk differences (aRDs) among workers reporting household incomes <250% and ≥250% of national poverty thresholds were estimated to assess effect modification by income. Approximately one half (45.6%; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 41.0%-50.3%) of non-health care workers reported use of hazard controls in the workplace, 55.5% (95% CI = 48.8%-62.2%) of whom reported employer requirements to use them. After adjustment for occupational group and proximity to others at work, voluntary use was approximately double, or 22.3 absolute percentage points higher, among workers who were provided hazard controls than among those who were not. This effect was more apparent among lower-income (aRD = 31.0%) than among higher-income workers (aRD = 16.3%). Employers can help protect workers from COVID-19 by requiring and encouraging use of occupational hazard controls and providing hazard controls to employees (1).


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Mandatory Programs/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Diseases/prevention & control , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Voluntary Programs/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Architectural Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Masks/statistics & numerical data , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology , Workplace/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
20.
J Nutr Educ Behav ; 53(1): 2-9, 2021 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1060105

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To explore the real-time personal/employee safety experiences and perspectives of school nutrition professionals ranging from frontline staff to state leadership across the US as they responded to the initial weeks of the coronavirus pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was administered electronically March 31-April 20, 2020, to school nutrition staff, managers, directors, and state agency personnel. Descriptive statistics were calculated, and a thematic analysis of an open-ended item was conducted. RESULTS: School nutrition professionals (n = 504) from 47 states responded. Most (86.6%) reported that ensuring employee safety was somewhat or much more difficult during the pandemic, and they were unaware of an emergency plan. Themes from open-ended responses regarding employee safety concerns included, exposure and transmission risk, processes, and personal concerns. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS: Attention to the safety and concerns of school nutrition employees is vital for continuation of these programs during this pandemic and for future emergency situations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Dietary Services/methods , Food Services/statistics & numerical data , Nutritionists/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Schools/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Dietary Services/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States
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