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1.
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto, Online) ; 32: e3237, 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2197537

ABSTRACT

Abstract Education is an area directly affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. Many teachers started to have new work demands, which can be perceived as stressful variables. This study aimed at analyzing the relationship between cognitive planning and occupational stress among teachers from Distrito Federal, in the COVID-19 pandemic context. This is a correlational and quantitative study, whose variables are cognitive planning, occupational stress and cognitive failures. Data collection was performed electronically with 29 adults aged between 30 and 49 years old, by applying the Cognitive Planning Scale, the Work-related Stress Scale and the Cognitive Failures Questionnaire. The analysis was conducted using descriptive statistics, parametric and non-parametric tests and correlations. The results indicated that there was no significant relationship between cognitive planning and occupational stress. In addition, the study contributed to the discussion of the effects of the pandemic on basic education professionals.


Resumo A educação é uma área diretamente afetada pela pandemia da COVID-19. Muitos professores passaram a ter novas exigências de trabalho, que podem ser percebidas como variáveis estressoras. Este estudo teve por objetivo analisar a relação entre planejamento cognitivo e estresse ocupacional de professores do Distrito Federal no contexto da pandemia da COVID-19. Trata-se de um estudo correlacional, quantitativo, tendo como variáveis planejamento cognitivo, estresse ocupacional e falhas cognitivas. A coleta de dados foi realizada eletronicamente, com 29 adultos entre 30 e 49 anos, por meio da aplicação da Escala de Planejamento Cognitivo, da Escala de Estresse no Trabalho e do Questionário de Falhas Cognitivas. A análise foi conduzida por meio de estatísticas descritivas, testes paramétricos e não paramétricos e correlações. Os resultados indicaram que não houve relação significativa entre planejamento cognitivo e estresse ocupacional. Ademais, o estudo contribui para a discussão dos efeitos da pandemia nos profissionais de Educação Básica.


Resumen La educación es un área directamente afectada por la pandemia COVID-19. Los profesores empezaron a tener nuevas demandas laborales que pueden percibirse como variables estresantes. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo analizar la relación entre planificación cognitiva y estrés ocupacional entre profesores del Distrito Federal, en el contexto de la pandemia COVID-19. Se trata de un estudio cuantitativo y correlacional, cuyas variables son la planificación cognitiva, el estrés laboral y las fallas cognitivas. La recolección de datos se realizó en forma electrónica con 29 adultos de 30 a 49 años de edad, mediante la Escala de Planificación Cognitiva, la Escala de Estrés Laboral y el Cuestionario de Fallas Cognitivas. El análisis se realizó mediante estadística descriptiva, pruebas paramétricas y no paramétricas y correlaciones. Los resultados indican que no hubo relación significativa entre planificación cognitiva y estrés ocupacional. Además, el estudio contribuye a la discusión de los efectos de la pandemia en profesores.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Education, Primary and Secondary , Faculty , Pandemics , Occupational Stress/psychology , COVID-19/psychology
2.
Paidéia (Ribeirão Preto, Online) ; 32: e3234, 2022. tab
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-2197535

ABSTRACT

Abstract The COVID-19 pandemic evidenced a scenario of increased demands on health professionals that can lead to professional burnout. This study aimed to investigate Burnout Syndrome (BS) and associated factors in nursing professionals working in intensive care units (ICU) of the public service during the COVID-19 pandemic. 157 professionals were evaluated regarding sociodemographic, occupational and working conditions variables, and the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) was used. The prevalence of BS was 45.2%, with some professionals suffering from more than one factor of the syndrome: emotional exhaustion (28.7%), depersonalization (3.8%) and low professional fulfillment (24.8%). Logistic regression analysis in the final model showed that female gender, not having children, statutory bond, professionals who had COVID-19 and declared wanting to leave the ICU environment had a higher risk of BS. The results showed BS in nursing professionals and that new risk factors were added with the advent of the pandemic.


Resumo A pandemia de COVID-19 evidenciou um cenário de acréscimo de demandas aos profissionais de saúde que pode levar ao esgotamento profissional. Este estudo teve como objetivo investigar a Síndrome de Burnout (SB) e fatores associados em profissionais de enfermagem nas unidades de terapia intensiva (UTI) durante a pandemia de COVID-19. Foram avaliados 157 profissionais em relação às variáveis sociodemográficas, ocupacionais e condições de trabalho, e o Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) foi utilizado. A prevalência da SB foi de 45,2%, com alguns profissionais em mais de um fator da síndrome: exaustão emocional (28,7%), despersonalização (3,8%) e baixa realização profissional (24,8%). Análise de regressão logística no modelo final mostrou que o gênero feminino, não ter filhos, vínculo estatutário, profissionais que tiveram COVID-19 e que declararam querer sair do ambiente de UTI tiveram maior risco de presença da SB. Os resultados evidenciaram SB nos profissionais de enfermagem e que novos fatores de risco foram acrescidos com o advento da pandemia.


Resumen La pandemia de la COVID-19 evidenció un escenario de mayores exigencias a los profesionales de la salud que puede derivar en desgaste profesional. Este estudio tuvo como objetivo investigar el Síndrome de Burnout (BS) y factores asociados en los profesionales de enfermería en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (UCI) durante la pandemia. Los 157 profesionales fueron evaluados con relación a las variables sociodemográficas, ocupacionales y condiciones de trabajo, y se utilizó el Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI). La prevalencia de SB fue del 45,2%, con algunos profesionales que sufren de más de un factor del síndrome: agotamiento emocional (28,7%), despersonalización (3,8%) y baja realización profesional (24,8%). El análisis de regresión logística mostró que el sexo femenino, no tener hijos, la relación laboral reglamentaria, los profesionales que contrajeron COVID-19 y que declararon querer salir del entorno de la UCI tuvieron un mayor riesgo de presencia de SB. Los resultados mostraron SB en profesionales de enfermería y que se agregaron nuevos factores de riesgo con el advenimiento de la pandemia.


Subject(s)
Humans , Male , Female , Burnout, Professional , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Intensive Care Units , Nurse Practitioners , Nurses , Risk Factors , Pandemics
3.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(28): e26646, 2021 Jul 16.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2191031

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The SARS- CoV-2 virus has been a public health crisis since its emergence in 2019. It has affected nearly all aspects of life. Education has been particularly hit, and a lot of effort has been put to implement more and more virtual platforms through online classes, meetings and conferences. Medical education has also been affected, especially because of the need for hands-on education, specifically in the clinical setting of the last 2 years. This had a huge psychological impact on the medical students currently enrolled in medical schools around the globe.In this descriptive study, we sent all medical students at the American University of Beirut Faculty of Medicine (AUBFM) an online anonymous survey by email. The survey started with general questions (age, gender and medical school year), followed by 3 sections that contain questions pertaining to the attitudes of medical students towards clinical rotations and online classes. Data was then analyzed using SPSSv24 and was then reported as percentages.Students were almost equally divided among the medical school classes (Med 1, 2, 3, and 4). The majority of clinical students (Med 3 and Med 4) reported that they feel nervous during their rotations in the hospital. Moreover, they reported that they have increased their use of disinfectants and personal protective equipment since the emergence of the pandemic. Moreover, the majority of medical students reported that they feel more stressed after shifting to online classes. Medical students also reported that they would be willing to go back to on-campus classes.This study aimed at describing the response of medical students at AUBFM to the COVID-19 pandemic in terms of stress. Limited data exists in the literature concerning the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on medical students in the middle East. Medical students reported that they feel more stressed and nervous during their clinical rotations and after the shift to online education, affecting their academic and social life. Further studies using a larger sample size are needed.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Education, Medical , Medical Staff, Hospital/psychology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Education, Distance , Female , Humans , Lebanon , Male , Medical Staff, Hospital/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Schools, Medical , Surveys and Questionnaires
4.
BMC Psychiatry ; 22(1): 380, 2022 06 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1881211

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Demand for mental health services in New Zealand and internationally is growing. Little is known about how psychiatrists are faring in this environment. This study aimed to investigate wellbeing of psychiatrists working in the public health system in New Zealand, identify the main risk factors for work-related stress, gauge perceptions of how workload has changed over time, assess job satisfaction and whether individuals intend or desire to leave their work. METHODS: Psychiatrists working in New Zealand who were also members of the Association of Salaried Medical Specialists were invited to participate in an online survey. Main outcome measures were degree of burnout and stress experienced at work. Supplementary measures included perceived workplace demands and levels of support. Predictor variables included perceptions of changes to workloads over time, degree of job satisfaction and intentions to leave work. Logistic regression assessed characteristics associated with burnout and job satisfaction as well as intentions to leave work. Free text comments were analysed thematically alongside quantitative trends. RESULTS: 368/526 responded (70% response rate). 34.6% met the criteria for burnout and 35.3% scored with high work stress. There were no significant patterns of association with demographic variables but significant correlation with all but one predictor variable; having experienced a change to the demands of the on-call workload. 45% agreed they would leave their current job if able and 87% disagreed that they are working in a well-resourced mental health service. Respondents emphasised the impact of growing workloads and expressed concerns about their ability to provide optimal care in these circumstances. CONCLUSIONS: High burnout appears to affect one in three psychiatrists in New Zealand. Many attribute their feelings of burnout to demand for their services. These findings may assist with better workforce planning for psychiatry and emphasises potential consequences of demand for and poor resourcing of mental health services for the retention and wellbeing of doctors in psychiatry worldwide.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Occupational Stress , Psychiatry , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , New Zealand , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(20)2022 Oct 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2142970

ABSTRACT

The main objective of the present study is to examine the impact of job stress, role ambiguity, work-life imbalance and burnout on employee turnover intention. Moreover, the mediating role of burnout between job stress, role ambiguity, work-life imbalance and turnover intention is also examined. The data collection for this quantitative research was conducted through the "Questionnaire" technique. The questionnaire was developed based on previously established questions available in the literature. The data were collected using simple random sampling from the healthcare workers of KSA. From the distributed questionnaire, 73.5% of the usable questionnaires were returned. This study used SPSS and PLS for the analysis of the data to highlight the most significant variables that impact the employees' turnover intentions among KSA health workers. The findings show that job burnout is clearly related to turnover intentions and is positively affected by both role stress and role ambiguity. Moreover, a statistically positive association is found between work-life imbalance and burnout among the healthcare workers in KSA. Furthermore, the mediating role of burnout is also confirmed in this study. The study also indicates that role ambiguity and role stress due to COVID-19 may create burnout among employees, which may lead to turnover intention among healthcare workers. There is a lack of research on the assessment of the impact of the novel COVID-19-related job stress, role ambiguity and work-life imbalance on the medical staff's turnover intentions in hospitals. This study fills the gap of the limited studies conducted regarding the identification of the factors that can create turnover intention among healthcare workers of KSA by providing empirical evidence from a Gulf country, Saudi Arabia. This study provides managerial implications for hospital management and health policymakers to develop a strategy to retain the employees. Furthermore, healthcare administrators need to pay close attention to front line workers' turnover intentions as these medical heroes are the vital part of our society who assist patients to receive their initial treatment during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Personnel Turnover , Intention , COVID-19/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Pandemics , Cross-Sectional Studies , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
BMJ Open ; 12(11): e059860, 2022 11 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2097978

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To investigate the risk factors for workplace bullying and mental health outcomes among workers during the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. SETTING: A nationwide online survey was conducted from August to September 2020 in Japan. PARTICIPANTS: 16 384 workers (men: n=9565; women: n=6789). MAIN OUTCOME VARIABLES: Workplace bullying was measured by one item from the Brief Job Stress Questionnaire; severe psychological distress according to the Kessler Psychological Distress Scale (≥13) and suicidal ideation by one item. Prevalence ratios were calculated by modified Poisson regression analyses adjusting for potential confounders such as gender, age, occupational characteristics and a prior history of depression. RESULTS: Overall, 15% of workers experienced workplace bullying, 9% had severe psychological distress and 12% had suicidal ideation during the second and third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic in Japan. The results of this study showed men, executives, managers and permanent employees had a higher risk of bullying than women or part-time workers. Increased physical and psychological demands were common risk factors for bullying, severe psychological distress and suicidal ideation. Starting to work from home was a significant predictor for adverse mental health outcomes but a preventive factor against workplace bullying. CONCLUSIONS: The results of this study showed different high-risk groups for bullying or mental health during the pandemic. Any intervention to decrease workplace bullying or mental health problems should focus not only on previously reported vulnerable workers but also workers who have experienced a change in work style or job demands.


Subject(s)
Bullying , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Psychological Distress , Male , Female , Humans , Suicidal Ideation , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Workplace/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Japan/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
8.
Acta Biomed ; 93(5): e2022250, 2022 Oct 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2091391

ABSTRACT

AIM: The objective of this study was to assess the level of knowledge, attitude and practice (KAP) and perceived job stress among physical therapists (PTs) during the COVID-19 pandemic in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). METHODS: A cross-sectional study design was adopted; 300 PTs working within the KSA were randomly selected, and the KAP questionnaire was distributed through email using a Google form during the first quarter of 2022. The questionnaire consisted of demographic information, KAP, and perceived stress level at the job. Data analysis was carried out using SPSS 20.0. RESULTS: Most PTs are knowledgeable about the management of COVID-19 patients, where their overall correct response to the items of the knowledge-related questionnaire was 87%. Most PTs had positive attitudes toward successful control of COVID-19 (83%) and took necessary precautions, such as frequent handwashing (97.2%) and adherence to the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) guidelines (91.5%) during practice. The overall job stress level of the PTs was 'Moderate' (76.5%). This study showed a significant association between the level of job stress experienced by the PTs and selected demographic variables. CONCLUSION: PTs have adequate knowledge, exhibit a positive attitude and adhere to CDC guidelines while managing patients during the COVID-19 pandemic. Most PTs are prone to moderate job stress while managing patients during the COVID-19 pandemic, and appropriate strategies must be devised to alleviate their job stress and improve their efficiency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Physical Therapists , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics/prevention & control , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Occupational Stress/epidemiology
10.
Int Marit Health ; 73(3): 133-142, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2067070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The frequent encounters of seafarers with people from different countries compared to other occupations increase their risk of contracting different variants of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19). This risk may cause additional anxiety for them. The main purpose of this research is to determine the mediating role of COVID-19 burnout and intention to quit in the impact of seafarers' anxiety about contracting COVID-19 on work stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The research is a quantitative correlational research design cross-sectional study. We determined the research data according to the random sampling technique. Participants consist of 390 maritime business employees operating in Istanbul and Izmir. We determined the participants based on voluntary participation. We collected the data with the help of the Coronavirus Anxiety Scale, COVID-19 Burnout Scale, Intention to Quit Scale, and Work Stress Perception Scale. RESULTS: The study found that seafarers' anxiety about contracting the novel coronavirus positively influences their perception of job stress and that COVID-19 burnout and intention to quit strongly mediate this interaction. We also determined that seafarers had a high level of COVID-19 anxiety, leading to a higher perception of COVID-19 burnout. CONCLUSIONS: These findings mean that although personal factors are important, negative psychological perceptions feed off each other and cause another psychological perception. The research results need to be strengthened by psychological factors such as job satisfaction, organizational trust and organizational support, and their psychological resilience should be increased so that seafarers do not show COVID-19 anxiety due to job stress and intention to quit.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 28.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065944

ABSTRACT

Chronic stress has been associated with a range of health disparities, but examination of occupational stress, especially in the wake of COVID-19, has been minimal for many careers. A novel methodology involving work stress diaries and collection of salivary cortisol was employed to determine correlations between occupations, occupational stressors, and how well these are related to the physiological response to stress exposure, the release of cortisol. While cortisol levels tended to follow typical circadian rhythm based on sampling times, cortisol levels also followed the subjective stress levels listed in the work stress diaries following linear regression analysis using the pooled study population data (p = 0.042). When comparing the stressors between the studied careers, participants who worked in the healthcare industry accounted for one-third of the total participants, but reported nearly half (42%) of the more severe occupational stressors listed in the diaries. Finally, the most commonly listed emotional reactions to exposures listed included feelings of stress, frustration, anger, anxiety, or overwhelm. As the workplace progresses from the pandemic, the opportunity to reduce occupational stress exposures in the workplace is at hand. Companies that work towards minimizing the stress faced by their workforce would have a healthier and more relaxed workforce.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Circadian Rhythm , Humans , Hydrocortisone/analysis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Saliva/chemistry , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Workplace/psychology
12.
Front Public Health ; 10: 895506, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2065641

ABSTRACT

Introduction: A good working climate increases the chances of adequate care. The employees of Emergency in Hospitals are particularly exposed to work-related stress. Support from management is very important in order to avoid stressful situations and conflicts that are not conducive to good work organization. The aim of the study was to assess the work climate of Emergency Health Services during COVID-19 Pandemic using the Abridged Version of the Work Climate Scale in Emergency Health Services. Design: A prospective descriptive international study was conducted. Methods: The 24-item Abridged Version of the Work Climate Scale in Emergency Health Services was used for the study. The questionnaire was posted on the internet portal of scientific societies. In the study participated 217 women (74.5%) and 74 men (25.4%). The age of the respondents ranged from 23 to 60 years (SD = 8.62). Among the re-spondents, the largest group were Emergency technicians (85.57%), followed by nurses (9.62%), doctors (2.75%) and Service assistants (2.06%). The study was conducted in 14 countries. Results: The study of the climate at work shows that countries have different priorities at work, but not all of them. By answering the research questions one by one, we can say that the average climate score at work was 33.41 min 27.0 and max 36.0 (SD = 1.52). Conclusion: The working climate depends on many factors such as interpersonal relationships, remuneration or the will to achieve the same selector. In the absence of any of the elements, a proper working climate is not possible.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Emergency Medical Services , Occupational Stress , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Organizational Culture , Pandemics , Young Adult
13.
New Solut ; 32(3): 223-229, 2022 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053671

ABSTRACT

The root causes of health care worker strain and depression include excessive job demands, extended work schedules, little decision-making opportunity, assault, bullying, and fear of injury. Potential links between working conditions and opioid overuse have also been discussed, beginning with psychological job strain or with physical pain leading to medication use. Promising solutions have been identified and many would be cost-effective, as enhanced working conditions could improve workers' mental health, job satisfaction, retention, and patient outcomes. Considering the number of health care workers leaving work during the global COVID-19 pandemic, it is urgent to address preventable root causes. In 2021, the US Congress called for educating health workers and first responders on the primary prevention of mental health conditions and substance use disorders. The CDC issued a Request for Information; this submission summarized research from CPH-NEW, a NIOSH Center of Excellence in Total Worker Health®, supplemented by a selective literature review.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , United States , Humans , Mental Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, U.S. , COVID-19/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/prevention & control
14.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(5): e300-e305, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051649

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalences of COVID-19-related workplace bullying and harassment (WBH) and customer harassment among healthcare workers (HCWs) compared to non-HCWs during COVID-19 outbreaks. METHODS: A baseline (March 2020) and follow-up surveys (May, August, and November 2020) were conducted of full-time employees, with an online questionnaire that included items on COVID-19-related WBH and customer harassment. The prevalences were compared between HCWs and non-HCWs using generalized linear models with repeated measures. RESULTS: A total of 800 (56%) respondents completed all the surveys. Prevalences of WBH and customer harassment were 5% to 10% and 10% to 13%, respectively, among HCWs during the follow-up. HCWs had a significantly higher prevalence of WBH in May (Adjusted OR = 2.3) and customer harassment in November (Adjusted OR = 2.7), compared to non- HCWs. CONCLUSIONS: HCWs remained at high risk of COVID-19-related WBH and customer harassment during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
Bullying , COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Occupational Stress , Workplace , COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Follow-Up Studies , Harassment, Non-Sexual , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires
15.
J Occup Environ Med ; 64(5): e273-e278, 2022 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2051648

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: This article explores the workplace stresses faced by home working (HW) employees in the COVID-19 outbreak; what strategies human resource manager (HRM) may deal with the present circumstances. DESIGN/ METHODOLOGY/APPROACH: We refer to the views and perceptions of HRM and review the current state of stress faced by home-based workers and their responses through the lens of HRM. FINDINGS: (1) The types as eustress, acute stress, and chronic stress and the stressors as work, family, and psychological were analyzed. (2) HW brought more adverse effects caused by work-related stress than benefits. (3) HRM can provide stress mitigation from job support, work-family balance, and psychological relief. ORIGINALITY/VALUE: By focusing on those employees who are most vulnerable to pandemic fatigue and work-related stress, HRM can build better organizations for all employees. HRM practices may consider measures related to job itself, family, or psychology to reduce the stress of HW under the COVID-19 crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Teleworking , Workplace/psychology
16.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043753

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to analyze the mediating effect of self-efficacy and coping strategy in the relationship between job stress and the psychological well-being of care workers. The subjects were 112 home-visiting care workers, and data were collected at four home-visiting nursing centers in a metropolitan city and a small and medium-sized city from July to August 2022. The collected data were analyzed by descriptive statistics, t-test, ANOVA, Pearson's correlation co-efficient, multiple linear regression, and Sobel test. The mean score of psychological well-being was 3.33 ± 0.46 out of a possible 5. The subject's psychological well-being was correlated with self-efficacy (r = 0.64, p < 0.001), problem-solving-focused coping (r = 0.58, p < 0.001), social-support-seeking coping (r = 0.34, p < 0.001), job stress (r = -0.31, p = 0.001), avoidance-focused coping (r = -0.37, p < 0.001). Self-efficacy (Z = -4.92, p < 0.001), problem-solving-focused coping (Z = -2.56, p = 0.010), and avoidance-focused coping (Z = -3.07, p = 0.002) had a mediating effect in the relationship between job stress and psychological well-being of the subjects during the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on these results, the psychological well-being nursing intervention program for home-visiting care workers need to include job stress, problem-solving-focused coping, and avoidance-focused coping.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Self Efficacy , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(19)2022 Sep 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2043733

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this research was to analyze how different effects of the COVID pandemic, expressed through pandemic accentuated occupational stress, perceived job insecurity, occupational safety and health perception and perceived organizational effectiveness, may impact turnover intentions of the personnel in the hospitality industry. Our research team designed an online questionnaire which was analyzed with network analysis to depict the relationship between factors, and, then, a confirmatory factor analysis was employed to confirm the distribution of the items to the envisaged five factors. Based on a sample of 324 randomized Romanian hospitality industry staff, the results of our cross-sectional study revealed that occupational safety and health perception, perceived organizational effectiveness and perceived job insecurity in the pandemic accentuated occupational stress to indirectly and significantly impact hospitality industry staff turnover intentions (TI). The results indicated that, while the total effect of PAOS on TI was significant, the direct effect was still significant, while all three mediators remained significant predictors. Overall, mediators partially mediated the relationship between PAOS and TI, indicating that employees with low scores on occupational safety and health perception (OSHP), and perceived organizational effectiveness (POE) and high scores on perceived job insecurity (PJI) were more likely to have higher levels of TI turnover intentions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Intention , Job Satisfaction , Mediation Analysis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics
18.
Environ Health Prev Med ; 27(0): 33, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2039172

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported an increase in loneliness since the outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), but there are few data on the relationship between job stress and loneliness. This study aimed to assess the relationship between job stress and loneliness among desk workers, with a focus on the impact of remote working. METHODS: This study was part of the Collaborative Online Research on the Novel-coronavirus and Work (CORoNaWork) project in Japan. We extracted data from 13,468 workers who indicated that they were doing desk work. Loneliness was assessed using a single question and job stress was valuated using the Job Content Questionnaire (JCQ). Multiple logistic regression was performed. RESULTS: Participants who worked remotely 4 or more days per week were marginally more likely to report feeling lonely compared with those who did not work remotely (adjusted odds ratio = 1.23, 95% CI: 0.99-5.84, P = 0.066). Remote working did not explain the interaction between JCQ scale scores and loneliness. Among remote workers, the level of support provided by co-workers and supervisors was strongly associated with feelings of loneliness as well as non-remote workers (co-worker support: AOR = 4.06, 95% CI: 2.82-5.84, P < 0.001; supervisor support: AOR = 2.49, 95% CI: 1.79-3.47, P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: To reduce loneliness and the risk of associated mental health problems, high-frequency remote workers should interact with supervisors and co-workers using the information and communication technology developed for this purpose.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Loneliness , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Stress, Psychological/complications , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Teleworking
19.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 19(18)2022 Sep 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2032927

ABSTRACT

This study identified clinical nurses' fatigue and related factors during the COVID-19 pandemic. This was a cross-sectional study. Data were collected from South Korean hospitals on 234 nurses' general characteristics, fatigue, depression, occupational stress, insomnia, and perceived daytime sleepiness using a structured questionnaire. The prevalence of fatigue was 62.0%, depression 52.1%, insomnia 20.7%, and daytime sleepiness 36.1%. Insomnia, sleepiness, depression, and occupational stress were significantly associated with fatigue. Ward nurses who cared for COVID-19 patients within the past month had significantly higher occupational stress related to organizational climate than those who had not provided care, and ICU nurses who cared for COVID-19 patients had significantly higher job insecurity-related occupational stress. Nurses have a high prevalence of fatigue and depression during the pandemic. Thus, insomnia, sleepiness, depression, and occupational stress must be reduced to lower nurses' fatigue. Caring for COVID-19 patients was not significantly associated with fatigue, but there were significant differences in occupational stress between nurses who provided such care and those who did not. Work environment-specific strategies are needed to reduce nurses' occupational stress during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disorders of Excessive Somnolence/epidemiology , Fatigue/epidemiology , Fatigue/etiology , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleepiness , Surveys and Questionnaires
20.
Med Lav ; 113(4): e2022031, 2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2026274

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Musculoskeletal disorders (MSDs) and work-related stress are among the factors that can negatively affect work ability. Given the importance of midwives' health, this study aims to evaluate the work ability of midwives and to investigate its association with the prevalence of MSDs and work-related stress in midwifery. METHODS: Ninety-one midwives participated in this study. Three questionnaires, including Nordic musculoskeletal questionnaire (NMQ) plus body map, Persian version of work ability index (WAI) questionnaire, and Health and Safety Executive (HSE) job stress questionnaire, were used to collect data. Finally, the association of MSDs, work-related stress, and individual characteristics with WAI among midwives was investigated. RESULTS: The highest rates of pain and discomfort were reported in the lower back and neck. The mean job stress was 116.08 with the highest scores on demand, role, and control subscales. The work ability among midwives was at an acceptable level of 39.07 on average. Inter-variable association analysis showed that the work ability was significantly associated with pain in the past 12 months and the number of coexisting MSDs. Job stress was not associated with work ability. CONCLUSIONS: Midwives' WAI was at an acceptable level despite high prevalence of MSDs in midwives, the confirmation of the possible correlation between MSDs and work ability, as well as the high job stress in midwifery. Since the present study was conducted during the Covid-19 pandemic, the high stress in midwives may be partly due to the pandemic and may not be permanent. However, this level of stress may reduce the midwives' work ability over a long time.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Midwifery , Musculoskeletal Diseases , Occupational Diseases , Occupational Stress , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Musculoskeletal Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Diseases/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pain/epidemiology , Pandemics , Pregnancy , Surveys and Questionnaires , Work Capacity Evaluation
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