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2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(11)2023 May 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238531

ABSTRACT

Work characteristics and worker well-being are inextricably connected. In particular, the characteristics of work organization shape and perpetuate occupational stress, which contributes to worker mental health and well-being outcomes. Consequently, the importance of understanding and addressing connections between work organization, occupational stress, and mental health and well-being-the focus of this Special Issue-increasingly demand attention from those affected by these issues. Thus, focusing on these issues in the long-haul truck driver (LHTD) sector as an illustrative example, the purpose of this commentary is as follows: (1) to outline current research approaches and the extant knowledge base regarding the connections between work organization, occupational stress, and mental health; (2) to provide an overview of current intervention strategies and public policy solutions associated with the current knowledge base to protect and promote worker mental health and well-being; and (3) to propose a two-pronged agenda for advancing research and prevention for workers during the 21st century. It is anticipated that this commentary, and this Special Issue more broadly, will both echo numerous other calls for building knowledge and engaging in this area and motivate further research within complementary current and novel research frameworks.


Subject(s)
Occupational Health , Occupational Stress , Humans , Mental Health , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Motor Vehicles
3.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 9365, 2023 Jun 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20244887

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to significant changes in work and lifestyle, impacting occupational mental health. This study examines the time and individual heterogeneity in the pandemic's effects on occupational mental health using panel data from job stress checks spanning 2018 to 2021. On average, there was an initial alleviation of high-stress risk in 2020, followed by a deterioration in 2021. Based on the job demand-resource theory, we identify the group of employees most affected by the pandemic. The findings highlight that employees in unfavorable workplace conditions are more likely to experience substantial adverse impacts. Adequate workplace support, including factors like interpersonal relationships, managerial support, job meaning, control, and work-life balance, is crucial for mitigating high-stress risk. Additionally, during the early phase of the pandemic, engaged employees experienced a slight decline in occupational mental health, while those lacking job resources at their worksite faced higher levels of occupational stress in the subsequent year. These findings offer practical suggestions for person-centered coping strategies to mitigate the pandemic's adverse impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Workplace/psychology , Mental Health
4.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1169764, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-20238996

ABSTRACT

Background: Occupational stress is one of the major occupational health hazards globally. This study investigated the current situation of and factors influencing the occupational stress of physicians and nurses in emergency departments (EDs) after contracting coronavirus disease (COVID-19). Methods: An online questionnaire survey was conducted among physicians and nurses in EDs in China between January 5 and 8, 2023. A general descriptive analysis of variables was conducted, the differences in the occupational stress of physicians and nurses in EDs with different characteristics were analyzed using the chi-square test, and factors influencing occupational stress were investigated using generalized ordinal logistic regression. Results: Of the 1924 physicians and nurses in EDs who contracted COVID-19, 64.71% considered their occupational stress high or very high, with overly intense work as the primary stressor. Those with ≥ 10 years of work tenure, working in tertiary hospitals and with higher professional titles were more stressed, while females, nurses, those with a master's degree or higher, and those who continued to work after contracting COVID-19 were less stressed. There were differences in the predictors of occupational stress between physicians and nurses. Conclusion: China's physicians and nurses in EDs had high occupational stress after contracting COVID-19. Attention should be given to the occupational mental health of physicians and nurses in EDs, and training on the prevention and treatment of COVID-19 infection should be strengthened.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Physicians , Female , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Emergency Service, Hospital
5.
Int J Public Health ; 67: 1604769, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2322459

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate burnout among Bangladeshi nurses and the factors that influence it, particularly the association of workplace bullying (WPB) and workplace violence (WPV) with burnout. Methods: This cross-sectional study collected data from 1,264 Bangladeshi nurses. Mixed-effects Poisson regression models were fitted to find the adjusted association between WPB, WPV, and burnout. Results: Burnout was found to be prevalent in 54.19% of 1,264 nurses. 61.79% of nurses reported that they had been bullied, and 16.3% of nurses reported experience of "intermediate and high" levels of workplace violence in the previous year. Nurses who were exposed to "high risk bullying" (RR = 2.29, CI: 1.53-3.41) and "targeted bullying" (RR = 4.86, CI: 3.32-7.11) had a higher risk of burnout than those who were not. Similarly, WPV exposed groups at "intermediate and high" levels had a higher risk of burnout (RR = 3.65, CI: 2.40-5.56) than WPV non-exposed groups. Conclusion: Nurses' burnout could be decreased if issues like violence and bullying were addressed in the workplace. Hospital administrators, policymakers, and the government must all promote and implement an acceptable working environment.


Subject(s)
Bullying , Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Workplace Violence , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , COVID-19/epidemiology , Pandemics , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Workplace , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Work ; 75(1): 29-39, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2324714

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses have been affected by stress, developing many related consequences during the health emergency caused by the SARS-CoV-2 (COVID-19) pandemic. It is essential for healthcare organizations to protect their human resources because there is a strong correlation between the health status of healthcare workers and the quality of care provided. OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to measure the perception of the organizational health level of the workplace among COVID-19 nurses (i.e. nurses who directly dealt with COVID-19 countermeasures) as an influence on work quality and work-related stress. METHODS: A cross-sectional study was carried out by administering the Nursing Questionnaire on Organizational Health (QISO) to nurses in contact with COVID-19 patients. The search period ranged between August and September 2021 with nurses who work and/or worked in Lazio. RESULTS: 123 questionnaires were collected. The scores with a value below the recommended level (2,6) are: "Comfort of the working environment" (mean = 2.57; SD = 0.66); "Valorization of skills" (mean = 2.40; SD = 0.62); "Openness to innovation" (mean = 2.46; SD = 0.77); "Satisfaction with top management" (mean = 2.48; SD = 0.81); and the inverse scale "Fatigue" (mean = 2.94; SD = 0.55). CONCLUSION: Management of healthcare organizations should define action strategies to promote and increase organizational well-being and reduce work-related stress risk factors. Some action strategies that could be used include improving the elements of the work environment to make it more comfortable for workers; strengthening and improving communication; improving the relationship between nurses and senior management; and establishing a team of experts for psychological assistance.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Organizational Culture
7.
Front Public Health ; 10: 1037184, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2309275

ABSTRACT

Swift social and economic environmental changes such as those associated with the COVID-19 pandemic have led to decreased job security. Although numerous previous studies have examined the influence of job insecurity on employee perceptions, attitudes, and behaviors, the link between job insecurity and negative behavior and its underlying or intermediating mechanisms remain underexplored. The significance of an organization's positive behaviors, which fall under the umbrella of corporate social responsibility (CSR), also deserves more attention. To address these gaps, we examined both the mediator and the moderator in the association between job insecurity and negative employee behavior by establishing a moderated sequential mediation model. We hypothesized that the levels of employee job stress and organizational identification sequentially mediate the relationship between job insecurity and counterproductive work behavior as a representative negative behavior. We also hypothesized that CSR activities play a buffering role that moderates the influence of job insecurity on job stress. We used three-wave time-lagged data collected from 348 employees in South Korean organizations to demonstrate that job stress and organizational identification sequentially mediate the relationship between job insecurity and counterproductive work behavior, and that CSR activities function as a buffering factor that decreases the influence of job insecurity on job stress. The results of this research suggest that the levels of job stress and organizational identification (as sequential mediators) as well as CSR activities (as a moderator) are underlying mechanisms in the link between job insecurity and counterproductive work behavior.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Pandemics , Asian People , Employment
8.
Sci Rep ; 13(1): 5743, 2023 04 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2305756

ABSTRACT

The nature of physiotherapists' work involves an increased risk of occupational stress and burnout, particularly during the COVID-19 pandemic. Therefore, the aim of the study was to analyse the level of perceived generalised stress, the occupational stress and the occupational burnout syndrome among physiotherapists during the COVID-19 pandemic. One hundred seventy professionally active physiotherapists participated in the study: 100-during the pandemic and 70 before the COVID-19 pandemic. The study was carried out using the authors' survey, the Subjective Work Assessment Questionnaire (SWAQ), the Oldenburg Burnout Inventory (OLBI), the Perceived Stress Scale (PSS-10), and the Brief Coping Orientation to Problems Experienced (Mini-COPE) inventory. The physiotherapists examined prior to the pandemic exhibited a higher level of generalised stress and higher level of occupational stress and occupational burnout (p = 0.0342; p < 0.00001; p < 0.00001, respectively). The key factors which caused intensified occupational stress in both groups included the lack of rewards at work, social interaction, and the lack of support. The results suggest that healthcare professionals including physiotherapists are exposed to occupational stress and a high risk of occupational burnout, not only during the COVID-19 pandemic. Occupational stress prevention programmes should be based on the identification and elimination of all occupational risks.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Physical Therapists , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/complications , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Pandemics , Occupational Stress/epidemiology
9.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 23(1): 366, 2023 Apr 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2300454

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Turnover intention among nurses has risen in an alarming rate since the onset of the pandemic. There are various underlying factors to turnover intention. The present study aims to determine the effect of a number of mental factors on nurses' professional-turnover intention through two modulators of stress and resilience over COVID-19 period. METHODS: The current cross-sectional study was conducted at three hospitals in Khuzestan Province, southern Iran, during the winter of 2021. To collect the data, given the restrictions in place during COVID-19 period, the web link of electronic self-reported questionnaires (including general health, mental workload, work-family conflict, resilience, job stress, corona fear, and turnover intention) were sent to 350 nurses through e-mail and other social media (WhatsApp and Telegram). Accordingly, they were asked to complete the questionnaire during rest periods within two weeks. Totally, 300 people (85% participation) filled out the questionnaires. Finally, a model was constructed in the Amos software. RESULTS: The results showed that the four independent parameters of decreasing general health, increasing mental workload, increasing WFCs and fear of COVID-19 can indirectly increase nurses' turnover intention by increasing job stress. Among these variables, the highest indirect effect coefficient on turnover intention was related to the general health parameter (-0.141). The results also demonstrated a negative correlation between job stress and resilience, with lower resilience raising job stress and, consequently, increasing intention to quit the job. CONCLUSION: Mental factors affecting turnover intension were identified in this study through path analysis. Therefore, it is recommended that the required resilience-enhancing measures to be taken by hospitals and nursing administrations to reduce psychological pressures caused by mentioned variables with the aim of minimizing job-related stress and fostering nurse retention.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , Humans , Intention , Cross-Sectional Studies , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Job Satisfaction , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Personnel Turnover
10.
Int J Nurs Educ Scholarsh ; 20(1)2023 Jan 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2304260

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The psychosocial needs of nursing students are a pressing matter as mental health disorders may affect nursing students' journeys as professional nurses. LITERATURE REVIEW: Psychological distress and burnout in nurses are threats to worldwide health care, as the stress associated with the COVID-19 pandemic could lead to an unstable future global nurse workforce. DISCUSSION: Resiliency training can positively impact nurse stress, mindfulness, and resilience, as resilient nurses are better able to manage their response to stress and adversity which will contribute to positive patient outcomes. IMPLICATIONS FOR AN INTERNATIONAL AUDIENCE: Educating faculty on resilience will aid nurse educators to create new student instructional approaches to improve mental health wellness. CONCLUSIONS: Supportive faculty behaviors, self-care techniques, and resilience-building infused throughout the nursing curriculum may promote the effective transitioning of students into practice, providing the necessary foundation for improving workplace stress management and increasing longevity and satisfaction in the profession.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Resilience, Psychological , Humans , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Workforce
11.
Arh Hig Rada Toksikol ; 74(1): 42-47, 2023 Mar 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2284679

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to determine the sociodemographic characteristics that affect job stress and job satisfaction in 454 healthcare workers (physicians, nurses, midwives, technicians, and other healthcare personnel) working with COVID-19 patients in primary healthcare institutions in Turkey with a cross-sectional, web-based survey between 9 and 30 August 2021. The survey included a personal information form, a standard job stress scale, and the Minnesota Satisfaction Questionnaire. The levels of job stress and job satisfaction did not differ between male and female respondents. Singles reported lower job stress and higher job satisfaction than the married respondents. Job stress did not differ between departments, but respondents on the front line who worked in a COVID-19 intensive care unit (ICU) (at any point and/or at the time of the study) or the emergency department reported lower job satisfaction than those working in other departments. Similarly, while stress did not differ by educational status, satisfaction of respondents with bachelor's or master's degree was lower than that of the rest. Our findings also suggest that working in a COVID-19 ICU and age are significant predictors of higher stress, whereas lower education, working in a COVID-19 ICU, and being married are good predictors of lower satisfaction. Further research should include other sociodemographic variables that may affect stress and satisfaction at work, and similar studies should follow up to see what was left in the wake of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Male , Female , Pandemics , COVID-19/epidemiology , Turkey/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Surveys and Questionnaires , Personal Satisfaction
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 03 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255373

ABSTRACT

Working in a hospital environment is known for presenting unhealthy features that affect the workers' health-features which have currently been intensified due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Hence, this longitudinal study aimed to ascertain the level of job stress before and during the COVID-19 pandemic, how this changed, and its association with the dietary patterns of hospital workers. Data on sociodemographic, occupational, lifestyle, health, anthropometric, dietetic, and occupational stress were collected before and during the pandemic from 218 workers at a private hospital in the Recôncavo of Bahia, Brazil. McNemar's chi-square test was used for comparison purposes, Exploratory Factor Analysis to identify dietary patterns, and Generalized Estimating Equations to evaluate the interested associations. During the pandemic, participants reported increased occupational stress, shift work, and weekly workloads, compared with before the pandemic. Additionally, three dietary patterns were identified before and during the pandemic. No association was observed between changes in occupational stress and dietary pattens. However, COVID-19 infection was related to changes in pattern A (0.647, IC95%0.044;1.241, p = 0.036) and the amount of shift work related to changes in pattern B, (0.612, IC95%0.016;1.207, p = 0.044). These findings support calls to strengthen labour policies to ensure adequate working conditions for hospital workers in the pandemic context.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Longitudinal Studies , Pandemics , Brazil , Workplace , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Hospitals, Private
13.
Int J Occup Med Environ Health ; 36(1): 96-111, 2023 Mar 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2255139

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of the present study was to explore whether remote and on-site work stress during the COVID-19 pandemic was experienced with different severity. The second goal was to investigate stress conditions at both working modes. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The study involved 946 individuals working in the education system and BSS sector in different Polish organizations. The following tools were used: the Brief Scale of Vocational Stress by Dudek and Hauk, the Polish version of the scales to measure work-family conflicts by Grzywacz, Frone, Brewer and Kovner, Meyer and Allen's Affective, Continuance, and Normative Commitment Scales in the Polish adaptation by Banka, Wolowska and Bazinska, the Satisfaction with Job Scale by Zalewska. RESULTS: The analysis of intergroup differences revealed that remote work stress severity was significantly lower than on-site work stress severity. The regression analyses proved that work-family conflict and job satisfaction were significant predictors of remote and on-site work stress. Continuance commitment positively predicted on-site work stress. Both models turned out to be statistically significant. The variables included in the models explained 39% and 35% of the variability of the remote work and on-site work stress, respectively. CONCLUSIONS: Remote work is associated with lower stress severity than on-site work. For both types of work, the higher the level of work-family conflict, the higher the level of stress severity, but the higher the job satisfaction, the lower the stress severity. Continuance commitment is positively related to on-site stress, which means that people who work for an organization and see no alternative feel more stressed. Such an effect was observed only in the case of on-site work. The study findings are discussed in light of previous research, and implications for organizational practice are considered. Int J Occup Med Environ Health. 2023;36(1):96-111.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
14.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 20(5)2023 02 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2253008

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic put unprecedented pressure on all areas of activity, especially healthcare workers. Understanding the psychological response to the pandemic in healthcare workers is an important challenge. This study aims to investigate burnout, depression, and job stress factors in the medical personnel of a COVID-19-dedicated hospital, two years after the beginning of the pandemic. The survey was performed between the fifth and sixth pandemic waves in Romania. Employees of the Clinical Hospital for Infectious Diseases, Cluj-Napoca, completed an online survey using four tools: Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Copenhagen Burnout Inventory (CBI), the Karasek Job factors questionnaire, and the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). A total of 114 employees completed the questionnaire (10.83% of total employees). The results showed 100% prevalence of Maslach burnout (56.1% moderate and severe burnout) and 63.1% prevalence of depression. The infectious disease resident doctors had the highest prevalence of burnout scores, depression, and perceived Karasek job demands. The 22- to 30-year-old age group and the group with fewer than ten years of professional experience had a significantly higher prevalence of burnout and depression than older employees or employees with more professional experience. The COVID-19 pandemic continues to have a high impact on the mental health of healthcare workers.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Child , Young Adult , Adult , Pandemics , Romania , Depression , Burnout, Psychological , Health Personnel , Hospitals
15.
PLoS One ; 18(2): e0281556, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2252540

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to investigate the associations between day-to-day work-related stress exposures (i.e., job demands and lack of job control), job strain, and next-day work engagement among office workers in academic settings. Additionally, we assessed the influence of psychological detachment and relaxation on next-day work engagement and tested for interaction effects of these recovery variables on the relationship between work-related stressors and next-day work engagement. METHODS: Office workers from two academic settings in Belgium and Slovenia were recruited. This study is based on an Ecological Momentary Assessment (EMA) with a 15-working day data collection period using our self-developed STRAW smartphone application. Participants were asked repeatedly about their work-related stressors, work engagement, and recovery experiences. Fixed-effect model testing using random intercepts was applied to investigate within- and between-participant levels. RESULTS: Our sample consisted of 55 participants and 2710 item measurements were analysed. A significant positive association was found between job control and next-day work engagement (ß = 0.28, p < 0.001). Further, a significant negative association was found between job strain and next-day work engagement (ß = -0.32, p = 0.05). Furthermore, relaxation was negatively associated with work engagement (ß = -0.08, p = 0.03). CONCLUSIONS: This study confirmed previous results, such as higher job control being associated with higher work engagement and higher job strain predicting lower work engagement. An interesting result was the association of higher relaxation after the working day with a lower next-day work engagement. Further research investigating fluctuations in work-related stressors, work engagement, and recovery experiences is required.


Subject(s)
Occupational Stress , Work Engagement , Humans , Ecological Momentary Assessment , Job Satisfaction , Data Collection , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
J Trauma Stress ; 36(2): 421-432, 2023 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2251602

ABSTRACT

This study examined the association of three specific COVID-19-related workplace stressors (percentage of nursing work with COVID-positive [COVID+] patients, number of COVID-19-related patient deaths witnessed, and living separately from family for safety) and their associations with posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS) and symptoms of major depressive disorder (MDD) and generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) among 391 nurses (93.6% White, 93.4% utilize she/her pronouns). Cross-sectional data were collected via an online survey. Institutional betrayal (i.e., the perception that an institution failed to protect a member who depends on and trusts it) was examined as a moderator of these associations. Although institutional betrayal was not a significant moderator in the three individual models, it held small-to-medium-sized positive main effects with PTSS and symptoms of GAD and MDD in both the individual and combined models. In the individual models, the percentage of nursing work with COVID+ patients was significantly positively associated with all three mental health conditions, f2 = .019-.195, whereas it only showed a significant effect with PTSS in the combined model, f2 = .138. Living separately from family was significantly positively associated with PTSS and MDD symptoms in both the individual, f2 = .037 and .015, respectively, and combined models, f2 = .025 and .013, respectively. Number of patient deaths held a significant positive association with PTSS alone, f2 = .022, in the individual model only. The findings are discussed in light of ways in which health care settings can better support and prioritize mental health among nursing staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Depressive Disorder, Major , Occupational Stress , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Female , Humans , Mental Health , Cross-Sectional Studies , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/psychology
17.
Front Public Health ; 11: 1078540, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2262508

ABSTRACT

Background: The COVID-19 pandemic continues to pose unprecedented threats and challenges to global public health. Hospital Clinical Laboratory and public health institutions have been playing an important role in case detection, epidemic research and decision-making, and epidemic prevention and control. Objective: To explore the current situation and influencing factors of work stress of medical workers in hospital clinical laboratory in fighting against COVID-19. Methods: A cluster random sampling method was used to select seven hospitals from 14 tertiary hospitals in Xiamen, and medical workers in the selected hospitals were investigated by self-administered questionnaire. A total of 150 medical workers inclinical laboratory participated in this survey, 138 valid questionnaires were collected, with a response rate of 92%. Results: The work stress scores of the medical workers in the clinical laboratory of hospital in the COVID-19 epidemic were collected (55.22 ± 11.48); The top three dimensions of work stress score were work stress (work load), external environment and doctor-patient relationship. The results of multiple stepwise regression analysis showed that the working hours per day, whether overtime and night shift can get compensatory leave and Job satisfaction with the work of the clinical laboratory were the main factors affecting the work stress level of medical workers in the clinical laboratory of hospital during COVID-19 epidemic. Conclusion: The COVID-19 has caused great harm to the physical and mental health of the public. Medical staff are in the front line of prevention and control of the epidemic, so medical workers in hospital clinical laboratory exposed to a high level of stress at work. Laboratory leaders and hospital managers should take active and effective measures to reduce the working hours of the medical staff in clinical laboratory, optimize the arrangement of night shift and overtime working, strengthen the training of group and individual pressure management, reduce the work stress of the medical staff, improve the overall happiness of the medical staff in clinical laboratory, and stabilize the clinical laboratory team, improve the physical and mental health of medical workers in clinical laboratory.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , COVID-19/epidemiology , Job Satisfaction , Pandemics , Laboratories, Clinical , Physician-Patient Relations , Occupational Stress/epidemiology
18.
Nurs Open ; 10(7): 4336-4345, 2023 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276676

ABSTRACT

The study compared perceived differences in Quality of Work-Life (QoWL) among nurse clinicians and educators and coping strategies used by nurses. DESIGN: A cross-sectional study. METHODS: From August and November 2020, the study measured the QoWL and coping strategies of 360 nurses with two scales using a multi-stage sampling technique. The data were analysed with descriptive, Pearson correlation and multivariate linear regression analyses. RESULTS: Quality of Work-Life was generally low among nurses; nurse educators, however, had better QoWL than clinical nurses. Age, salary and nature of work predicted the QoWL of nurses. Work-family segmentation, seeking assistance, open communication and recreational activities were employed by most nurses to cope with challenges. With the rate of workload and work-related stress associated with COVID-19, nurse leaders must advocate for evidence-based coping strategies to deal with work and family life stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Cross-Sectional Studies , Adaptation, Psychological , Stress, Psychological
19.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 44: e20210309, 2023.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2276535

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To identify the levels of professional quality of life and the occupational stress in nursing professionals. METHOD: Cross sectional study conducted between April and August 2020, with nursing professionals working in inpatient units for clinical and surgical patients of a large hospital. The Work Stress Scale and the Professional Quality of Life Scale were applied. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 150 professionals, with a mean age of 43 ± 8.89 years, being 84.7% (127) female. The mean of the work stress scale was 1.9 (± 0.71), a moderate level of stress. It was found that compassion satisfaction had a median of 50.3 (9.1 - 64.6), burnout of 48.5 (32.2 - 84.8) and post-traumatic stress disorder of 47.1 (38.6 - 98.3). CONCLUSION: Stress at work and Compassion Fatigue were identified in the sample, especially in secondary-level professionals, demonstrating the need to implement strategies to reduce psycho-emotional harm in these professionals.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Female , Adult , Middle Aged , Quality of Life/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Pandemics , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Job Satisfaction
20.
PLoS One ; 18(3): e0283740, 2023.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2275319

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic led to accepting a lot of various protective pandemic management-related measures (PanMan), which may have had a large impact on health care workers (HCWs) but evidence is scarce. We therefore explored the impact of measures during the second wave. We assessed the associations of PanMan with the Quality of Life (QoL) of hospital HCWs. METHODS: We collected data from 215 HCWs (77.7% females, mean age 44.4), who were working at the COVID-related departments of one large hospital in eastern Slovakia via a questionnaire, specifically developed in direct collaboration with them. We assessed PanMan related factors, such as COVID-19 experience, information overload, non-adherence of the public, work stress, barriers and facilitators of health care provision, and QoL related factors, such as impact on family life and activities, housekeeping, relationships with relatives and mental well-being. To analyse the data, we used logistic regression models adjusted for age and gender. RESULTS: PanMan greatly impacted the QoL of HCWs, in particular family life, housekeeping and mental well-being (odds ratio, 6.8-2.2). The most influential PanMan factors were COVID-19 experience (3.6-2.3), work stress (4.1-2.4) and barriers in health care provision (6.8-2.2). Perceiving work stress had a negative impact on all QoL domains, even on relationships with the greatest impact. Conversely, the PanMan factors reducing the negative impact on QoL were training and colleagues' support (0.4-0.1). CONCLUSION: PanMan had a strong negative impact on the QoL of hospital HCWs during the second wave of the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Female , Humans , Adult , Male , Quality of Life , Pandemics , Slovakia/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Personnel, Hospital
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