Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 18 de 18
Filter
1.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 184-190, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals (HCPs) in family medicine (FM) in Croatia work in a demanding environment caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Besides particular circumstances in healthcare, an unknown virus, social distancing, and homeschooling, the capital was hit with the earthquake during the lockdown. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the influence of demographic characteristics, professional differences, medical history, and specific stressors on the psychological outcomes. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the online questionnaire containing the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) was conducted from 1st to 15 May 2020 in FM. RESULTS: HCPs (534, 35% response rate), predominantly female (84.5%), participated in the research. High prevalence of stress (30.9%), anxiety (33.1%), depression (30.7%), and PTSD (33.0%) were found. Female participants had higher results in the anxiety subscale of DASS-21 and IES-R scores. Pre-existing conditions were associated with higher levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. The IES-R score for PTSD showed borderline correlation (p = 0.053) with working in regions with the highest incidence of COVID-19. Having schoolchildren made a difference on a stress subscale in DASS-21 (p < 0.043), but the earthquake did not have an impact. CONCLUSION: Family physicians and nurses in FM in Croatia are under a great mental load during the COVID-19 outbreak. Results suggest that HCPs of the female sex, with pre-existing chronic conditions, work in regions with a high incidence of SARS-CoV-2 or have schoolchildren at greater risk of the poor psychological outcome.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Physicians, Family/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Croatia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Disasters , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Earthquakes , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Prevalence , Psychological Tests , Risk Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Young Adult
2.
Ann Clin Psychiatry ; 33(2): 101-107, 2021 05.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1194814

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic may adversely impact the mental health of health care workers (HCWs). To address this issue, it is essential to determine levels of anxiety, depression, and traumatic stress, and sources of stress, and to identify subgroups of HCWs at a higher risk of adverse mental health outcomes during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: We conducted a cross-sectional study of symptoms of mental illness in HCWs in the area surrounding Detroit, Michigan. The online survey included questions about demographics, health and clinical factors, and sources of stress. Several tools were used to assess psychiatric symptoms among HCWs, including the Perceived Stress Scale, the Patient Health Questionnaire depression scale, the Generalized Anxiety Disorder 7-item assessment, and the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist for DSM-5. The adequacy of personal protective equipment, patient resources, and training for highly contagious diseases were rated. RESULTS: The sample (N = 129) was predominantly female (51.2%) and White (65.9%), with 30.2% screening positive for clinical follow-up to assess anxiety, 20.9% for moderate to severe depression, and 16.3% for elevated traumatic stress. Differences were found by self-reported psychiatric diagnosis and chronic conditions, and role on treatment teams. CONCLUSIONS: Frontline HCWs demonstrate high levels of stress and trauma symptoms. Timely screening and accommodations may be needed during health care crises, such as the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Occupational Stress , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Michigan/epidemiology , Needs Assessment , Occupational Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/etiology , Stress Disorders, Traumatic/prevention & control , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , Stress, Psychological/psychology
3.
Med Sci Monit ; 27: e930812, 2021 Apr 19.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192441

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND Providing oncology services during a pandemic can contribute to mental health challenges among healthcare workers. The present study aimed to evaluate the levels of depression, anxiety, and stress in healthcare and administrative staff in 5 oncology institutions in Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH) in 2020 during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic using the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) questionnaire. MATERIAL AND METHODS A cross-sectional observational study enrolled 175 healthcare and administrative workers from 5 oncology institutions in BiH during December 2020. Data were collected using a questionnaire that captured general information about the participants and a DASS-21 questionnaire. RESULTS Statistical analysis revealed a statistically significant difference in the levels of depression, anxiety, and stress (P=0.003, P=0.011, and P=0.022, respectively) among participants with comorbidities connected with increased risk of severe illness caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) compared with participants without comorbidities. There was also a statistically significant difference in the levels of stress among participants from different cities (P=0.031). Supplement intake and educational level were significantly related (P=0.012). High levels of stress and anxiety were accompanied by high levels of depression among participants (P<0.01). CONCLUSIONS The findings from the present study showed that the COVID-19 pandemic has had an effect on depression, anxiety, and stress levels in oncology staff in BiH. Monitoring these levels and providing interventions and support to oncology staff are increasingly important for their wellbeing and retention at a time of global crisis in healthcare.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cancer Care Facilities , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/history , Bosnia and Herzegovina , COVID-19/history , Comorbidity , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/history , Female , History, 21st Century , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/history , Prevalence , Public Health Surveillance , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
Psychoneuroendocrinology ; 128: 105213, 2021 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164355

ABSTRACT

In the critical context of COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare workers are on the front line, participating directly in the care, diagnosis, and treatment of patients with COVID-19. This exposes them to a higher risk of developing chronic stress, psychological distress, and any other mental health symptoms. OBJECTIVE: to evaluate stress and burnout in a health workers population and, in addition, to measure hair cortisol concentration as a current biomarker of stress. MATERIALS AND METHODS: 234 health workers from Hospital de Clínicas "José de San Martín", Buenos Aires University, were included in this study. In this population hair samples were obtained from the posterior vertex as close to the scalp as possible and the individuals completed the following surveys: perceived stress, social support, burnout scale, life event scale, and sociodemographic data. Hair cortisol was measured by an automated chemiluminescent method. The studied population was divided into three groups considering those individuals below the healthy reference sample range (< 40 pg/mg hair), within the healthy reference range (40-128 pg/mg hair) and above the reference range (> 128 pg/mg hair). This study used a transversal and observational design. RESULTS: Our results show that 40% of the studied population presented hair cortisol values outside of the healthy reference range. In the whole studied population, a direct correlation was found between hair cortisol concentration and perceived stress as well as between hair cortisol concentration and the emotional exhaustion component of burnout (r = 0.142, p = 0.030; r = 0.143, p = 0.029, respectively). 12% of the studied population showed Burnout (52% doctors and residents, 19% nurses, 19% administrative personnel). Higher values in hair cortisol levels were found in the group with burnout versus individuals without burnout (p = 0.034). Finally, a mediation analysis was performed, finding that depersonalization is a mediating variable in the relationship between self-perceived stress and hair cortisol level (F = 4.86, p = 0.0086; indirect effect IC: 0.0987-1.8840). CONCLUSION: This is the first study in which a stress biomarker such as hair cortisol is evaluated in this population and in this context. Healthcare workers are subjected to increased levels of stress and burnout. High depersonalization, emotional exhaustion, and decreased personal sense of accomplishment characterize this population. It is the responsibility of the health authorities to implement strategies to manage this psychological emergency.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Hydrocortisone/metabolism , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/metabolism , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , Argentina/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/diagnosis , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Professional/metabolism , Burnout, Professional/physiopathology , Female , Hair/chemistry , Health Care Surveys , Hospitals, University/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/physiopathology , Personnel, Hospital/statistics & numerical data
5.
Recenti Prog Med ; 111(4): 205-206, 2020 Apr.
Article in Italian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1156093

ABSTRACT

In this pandemic global emergency, self-care and psycho-physical wellbeing's programs for healthcare workers are an absolute priority. Now more than ever, physicians and nurses are facing abnormal burdens of work, stressful clinical and organizational conditions and emotional charges that are challenging their ability to cope and jeopardizing their own lives. By improving nutritional education in medical faculties, implementing healthy lifestyles promotion and burnout prevention projects in the hospitals, we will be able to maintain a good quality of care throughout these trying times and hopefully we will improve the selfcare strategies for health professionals for the next future.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional/prevention & control , Medical Staff/psychology , Nursing Staff/psychology , Self Care , Burnout, Professional/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emotional Adjustment , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Life Style , Nutritional Support , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Workload
6.
J Occup Environ Med ; 63(6): 482-489, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1132644

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 is a unique disaster, which has placed extreme stress on Healthcare Workers (HCWs) and the systems in which they work. Eradicating the pandemic requires sustainment of the healthcare workforce through actions that mitigate stress, promote resilience, and enhance performance. A major barrier is the lack of organizational practices and procedures designed to sustain HCWs during prolonged crisis events, such as COVID-19. Adapting existing best practices from other high-risk occupations allows for a more rapid, efficient response to optimize workforce well-being and preserve healthcare organizational functioning. This paper discusses current and emerging literature on the unique impacts of COVID-19 on HCWs and provides actionable, evidence-informed recommendations for individuals, teams, and leaders to enhance sustainment of HCWs that is critical to the preservation of national and global health security.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Crisis Intervention , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Health , Resilience, Psychological , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Humans , Mental Health , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
7.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e042930, 2020 12 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-991833

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: Our study aims to understand the psychological impact of the COVID-19 pandemic among healthcare workers (HCWs) at acute hospital settings in the South-East of Ireland, as a crucial step in guiding policies and interventions to maintain their psychological well-being. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. PARTICIPANTS AND SETTING: 472 HCWs participated from two distinct acute hospital settings, A and B, in the South-East of Ireland. PRIMARY AND SECONDARY OUTCOME MEASURES: Measures of psychological distress-depression, anxiety, acute and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD)-as dictated by the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R). An independent sample t-test and a Mann-Whitney U test was used to determine significance of difference in continuous variables between groups. Categorical variables were assessed for significance with a χ2 test for independence. RESULTS: The DASS-21 provided independent measures of depression (mean 4.57, IQR 2-7), anxiety (mean 3.87, IQR 1-6) and stress (mean 7.41, IQR 4-10). Positive scores were reflected in 201 workers (42.6%) for depression and 213 (45.1%) for both anxiety and stress. The IES-R measured subjective distress on three subscales: intrusion (mean 1.085, IQR 0.375-1.72), avoidance (mean 1.008, IQR 0.375-1.5) and hyperarousal (mean 1.084, IQR 0.5-1.667). Overall, 195 cases (41.3%) were concerning for PTSD. Site B scored significantly higher across all parameters of depression (5.24 vs 4.08, p<0.01), anxiety (4.66 vs 3.3, p<0.01), stress (8.91 vs 6.33, p<0.01) and PTSD (0.058 vs 0.043, p<0.01). Worse outcomes were also noted in HCWs with underlying medical ailments. CONCLUSION: Psychological distress is prevalent among HCWs during the COVID-19 pandemic; screening for adverse mental and emotional outcomes and developing timely tailored preventative measures with effective feedback are vital to protect their psychological well-being, both in the immediate and long-term.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Hospitals/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Health Policy , Humans , Ireland/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health/trends , Needs Assessment , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Preventive Health Services , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Psychological Distress , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology
8.
Saudi Med J ; 41(12): 1344-1349, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-965186

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the impact of coronavirus-19 (COVID-19) pandemic and its consequences on general surgery residents. Methods: Cross-sectional, survey based study including surgical residents in Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Kingdom of Bahrain. RESULTS: Surgical trainees who participated in our survey (n=234) were young (mean age 28), single (53.8%), and males (65.8%). Approximately half (50.4%) have been deployed to cover the staff shortage in intensive care units (ICUs) or emergency departments (EDs). Half of our trainees (117) scored positive in the screening tool of generalized anxiety disorder (GAD). There was a significant association between experiencing anxiety and male gender (p=0.055), level of training (p=0.002), deployment to cover ICUs (p=0.050), testing positive for COVID-19 (p=0.054) and having an infected family member (p=0.004). CONCLUSION: Coronavirus-19 pandemic has a serious effect on all healthcare workers and surgical residents have experienced a considerable amount of stress. Accordingly, this psychological burden should be appropriately addressed in organizations planning strategies. We suggest formulating guidelines to help surgical trainees to continue their learning process with least psychological burden.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Surgery/education , Internship and Residency , Occupational Stress/etiology , Resilience, Psychological , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Bahrain/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Male , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Surgeons/education
10.
BMJ Case Rep ; 13(10)2020 Oct 31.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-901291

ABSTRACT

A previously fit and well 37-year-old male healthcare worker presented with confusion, psychotic symptoms and a suicide attempt in the context of a new COVID-19 diagnosis. Following surgical interventions and an extended admission to the intensive care unit, he made a good recovery in terms of both his physical and mental health. A number of factors likely contributed to his presentation, including SARS-CoV-2 infection, severe insomnia, worry, healthcare worker-related stress, and the unique social and psychological stressors associated with the COVID-19 pandemic. This case highlights the need to further characterise the specific psychiatric sequelae of COVID-19 in community settings, and should remind general medical clinicians to be mindful of comorbid psychiatric symptoms when assessing patients with newly diagnosed COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Psychotic Disorders/complications , Psychotic Disorders/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Suicide, Attempted/prevention & control , Adult , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Humans , Male , Nurses, Male/psychology , Occupational Stress/complications , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pandemics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prognosis , Psychotic Disorders/drug therapy , Psychotic Disorders/physiopathology , Risk Assessment , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/complications , Stress, Psychological , Treatment Outcome , United Kingdom
12.
Ann Glob Health ; 86(1): 128, 2020 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-887660

ABSTRACT

Background: COVID-19 first appeared in China in December 2019, with a high rate of infectivity and morbidity, which brought tremendous psychological pressure to healthcare workers. Purpose: To understand the psychological health status of healthcare workers during the COVID-19 outbreak and decline, and to provide a theoretical reference for the future establishment of a psychological crisis intervention system. Methods: Healthcare workers were recruited using convenience sampling and snowball sampling methods, and the electronic version of the SCL-90 scale and a sociodemographic questionnaire were administered. In the pretest, a total of 5018 responses were collected; after six weeks, random sampling was performed. The SCL-90 and measures of other epidemic-related problems were administered, with 1570 responses received; then, the final data analysis was performed. Results: After six weeks, the post-test GSI score; SCL-90 total score; and PST, PSDI, O-C, I-S, DEP, ANX, PHOB, PAR, PSY, and HOS scores were significantly lower than the corresponding pretest scores (p < 0.05). The results by occupational category showed that the scores of nursing staff decreased significantly for 12 indexes and that the scores of the doctors and other hospital staff also significantly decreased. There was a significant difference between the pretest (50.78 ± 28.18) and post-test (45.00 ± 28.49) scores for the degree of worry about the epidemic. Healthcare workers believed that the top three aspects of life affected by the epidemic were economic problems (816 people), interpersonal communication problems (731 people), and mental health (728 people). Conclusion: Over the course of the epidemic, the item scores generally declined significantly. Therefore, during an outbreak period, attention should be paid to psychological crisis interventions for healthcare workers; problems caused by psychological pressure, and even other psychological conditions, can be significantly alleviated to reduce the probability of subsequent health problems.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , Coronavirus Infections , Crisis Intervention/methods , Depression , Health Personnel/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Stress, Psychological , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Female , Humans , Male , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/classification , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/diagnosis , Stress, Psychological/etiology
13.
Issues Ment Health Nurs ; 42(1): 3-14, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-857479

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 pandemic is putting a strain on health systems around the world. Healthcare workers, on the front lines of the epidemic, are facing major and potentially traumatic stressful events, overwhelming their ability to cope and their resources. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this article will be to show how the use of the URG-EMDR protocol in a telemental health setting has proven to be feasible and effective in the treatment of a group of healthcare professionals working in nursing homes or hospital services that were highly mobilized during the acute phase of COVID-19. METHOD: 17 participants, registered nurses (N = 7) and licensed practical nurses (N = 10), were remotely treated using the URG-EMDR protocol in a single session. The assessment focused on anxiety and depressive symptoms (HAD scale) and the level of perceived disturbance (SUD). An additional evaluation of the satisfaction with the remote psychotherapy intervention was conducted. RESULTS: As the URG-EMDR protocol has already proven itself during emergency interventions, it is interesting to note that its remote use in the treatment of healthcare providers caring for COVID-19 patients allows for an improvement in the emotional state and a decrease in perceived disturbance, in a single session. This result is maintained 1 week after the intervention, despite the continued professional activities of the participants and the continuity of the event. Moreover, the remote therapy setting was judged satisfactory by the patients, even if it required adjustments and certain recommendations for practice. DISCUSSION: The remote use of the URG-EMDR protocol opens up innovative perspectives for early interventions and the prevention of the development of psychological disorders in the long term following a situation of acute stress.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Distance Counseling/methods , Eye Movement Desensitization Reprocessing/methods , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/therapy , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/etiology , Anxiety/prevention & control , COVID-19/therapy , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/etiology , Depression/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/etiology , Pilot Projects
14.
J Thorac Cardiovasc Surg ; 160(4): 980-987, 2020 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-823363

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has overwhelmed health care systems and disrupted routine care internationally. Health care workers face disruption to their work routines and professional development, as well as an elevated risk of infection and morbidity. We sought to establish the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the well-being, practice, and progression of all trainees in cardiothoracic surgery in the United Kingdom. METHODS: A 31-item questionnaire was designed, validated, and disseminated via e-mail and an instant-messaging platform. RESULTS: In total, 76 (of 118, 64%) cardiothoracic surgical trainees responded, representing all training grades and programs nationally; 48 (63%) and 24 (32%) were concerned about their physical and mental health, respectively, 25 (33%) had taken time off work due to COVID-19, 65 (86%) had treated patients with COVID-19, 36 of whom (55%) were wearing satisfactory personal protective equipment at the time, 41 (54%) remain concerned about personal protective equipment provision at their institution, 42 (55%) had been redeployed to cover other specialties, and 23 (30%) had encountered ethical dilemmas related to care of patients. There was a significant impact on time spent in outpatient clinics (44% reduction), multidisciplinary team meetings (79% reduction), and operating theaters (78% reduction). In total, 67 (88%) of respondents were concerned about the impact on their training, and 54 (71%) felt that the deviation may require an extension in their planned training time. CONCLUSIONS: The duration and impact of the current pandemic is, as yet, uncertain. Timely sharing of experiences, concerns, and expectations will inform health care and education policy and influence practice in the pandemic era and beyond.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Education, Medical, Graduate , Occupational Stress/etiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , Students, Medical/psychology , Surgeons/psychology , Thoracic Surgery/education , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Occupational Health , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
15.
Med Clin (Barc) ; 155(10): 434-440, 2020 11 27.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-779440

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: The Covid-19 pandemic has put healthcare professionals around the world in an unprecedented challenge. This may cause some emotional difficulties and mental health problems. The aim of the present study was to analyze the emotional status among the health care workers form the Hospital of Igualada (Barcelona), while they were facing with Covid-19 in one of the most affected regions in all of Europe. PATIENTS AND METHODS: A total of 395 participants were included in the study. A cross-sectional assessment was carried out between the months of March and April. Information about anxiety, depression, and stress was gathered. We also collected demographic data and concerning potentially stressful factors. RESULTS: A significant proportion of professionals reported symptoms of anxiety (31.4%) and depression (12.2%) from moderate to severe intensity. Symptoms of acute stress were reported by 14.5% of participants. We performed a regression analysis, which explained the 30% of the variance associated with the degree of emotional distress (Ry=0.30). The final model reveals that females (or young males), who are working in the frontline as nursing assistants, caretakers or radiology technicians, with the uncertainty of a possible infection, the perception of inadequate protection measures and having experienced the death of a close person by Covid-19, showed a heightened risk of experiencing psychological distress. CONCLUSIONS: Coping with the Covid-19 pandemic caused a significant impact on emotional status of healthcare workers involved in this study.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Psychiatric Status Rating Scales , Risk Factors , Spain/epidemiology , Young Adult
16.
Psychiatr Danub ; 32(Suppl 1): 5-9, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-743579

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 epidemic has been a major global public health problem during past months in Italy and in several other Countries and on the date of publication of this article, is still a serious public health problem. The health staff, engaged in the care of the sick and in the prevention of the spread of the infection have been subjected to a further increase in psychological difficulties and work-related stress, related to the workload for the continuous influx of sick and intense and close working shifts for the viral emergency. The SAVE-9 (Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics - 9 items) scale has been developed as a tool for assessing work anxiety and stress in response to the viral epidemic of health professionals working to prevent the spread of the virus and to treat infected people.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Humans , Italy , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Dermatol Ther ; 33(6): e14161, 2020 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-695322

ABSTRACT

There is a sparsity of data regarding the mental health status of dermatologists during COVID-19 pandemic. Evaluate the effects of pandemic on mental health of dermatologists on a large scale and identify risk factors for mental distress. 733 dermatologists were included in this cross-sectional, web-based survey. Mental distress was reported by 77.2% of responders. Considerable percentages of participants experienced stress (73.9%), irritation (33.7%), insomnia (30%), or depression (27.6%), and 78.6% were overwhelmed with the amount of pandemic information they were receiving. Mental distress was significantly associated with practice years, volume of patients seen per week before pandemic, personal protective equipment availability at hospital (P = .001 for each), practice location (continent; P < .001), and participant's assessment that the healthcare system was not equipped for the pandemic (P = .003). Stress was associated with hospital service (P = .003), and depression with being overwhelmed with the amount of pandemic information received (P = .004). In a logistic model, teledermatology use was the most powerful predictor of mental distress (OR, 1.57 [95% CI, 1.07-2.32]). Mental distress was common among dermatologists during this pandemic. Teledermatology use was the most powerful predictor of mental distress. Preventative strategies and psychosocial interventions should be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Dermatologists/psychology , Mental Health , Occupational Health , Occupational Stress/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/psychology , Health Surveys , Humans , Irritable Mood , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/psychology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology
18.
Psychol Psychother ; 94 Suppl 2: 536-543, 2021 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647379

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 research from China suggests health care workers are at risk of distress, have specific concerns, and need support. It remains unknown whether findings are applicable to UK health care staff and whether psychological support based on generic approaches is effective. We administered an online survey at a leading neuroscience hospital in the UK to examine how individual staff characteristics contribute to distress, concerns, and interventions most valued during the COVID-19 pandemic. We found a high incidence of distress, particularly in females and staff with previous mental health history. Concerns fell into three factors: 'risk of infection', 'work challenges', and 'social change', and were affected by professional role and contact with COVID-19 patients. These three factors predicted distress. Psychological support and clear updates were deemed most useful, with specific needs affected by age, professional role, and contact with COVID-19 patients. This is the first documentation of a high incidence of psychological distress predicted by three types of concerns in health care workers of a neuroscience hospital. Distress, concerns, and interventions most valued were all affected by individual staff characteristics. These findings highlight the importance of providing stratified, one to one support interventions, tailored to professional group, and background, rather than more generic approaches. PRACTITIONER POINTS: The COVID-19 pandemic has resulted in a high incidence of psychological distress in UK health care staff. Distress, concerns, and interventions most valued are influenced by individual staff characteristics. Stratified, one-to-one support interventions, tailored to professional group, and background, rather than more generic approaches for stress reduction and resilience, are crucial.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Mental Health Services , Neurosciences , Occupational Health Services/methods , Occupational Stress/etiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Incidence , Male , Middle Aged , Needs Assessment , Occupational Exposure , Occupational Health , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , Professional Role , Risk Factors , Sex Factors , Social Support , United Kingdom/epidemiology
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL
...