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1.
Front Public Health ; 9: 782846, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1597691

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to analyze occupational and personal stressors, mental health indicators, perceived discrimination and help-seeking behaviors among healthcare workers and providers (HCWPs) serving socially vulnerable groups such as immigrants, refugees, farmworkers, homeless individuals, people living in poverty, and other disadvantaged populations in the United States (U.S.) during the COVID-19 pandemic. Using a cross-sectional descriptive approach, we gathered information between July and September 2020, from a sample of 407 affiliates of two national organizations of clinic-based HCWPs who worked at federally funded and community safety-net clinics. Informed consent was obtained from all participants who completed a self-administered online survey available in English and Spanish. Our results indicated that the HCWPs serving vulnerable groups in the midst of the pandemic experienced high levels of occupational and personal stressors as well as anxiety and depressive symptomology. Major occupational stressors were excessive workload, long working-hours, and institutional barriers to refer and follow-up on their clients' access to needed social services. High-rated personal stressors included sleep disorders, lack of and child-care, partner's loosing job, and other family related situations. Our findings suggest that HCWPs working with vulnerable populations need specialized interventions that bolster their mental health and well-being as the pandemic continues to unfold. We recommend implementing initiatives that encourage HCWPs' to be actively involved in clinic decisions regarding employee safety and protection as well as in management decisions to improve work place infrastructure and capacity to respond to the social needs of their clients. Lessons learned from the pandemic are useful tools in designing protocols for addressing the mental-health needs of HCWPs in health-care organizations that attend to socially underprivileged populations.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Cross-Sectional Studies , Health Personnel , Humans , Mental Health , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , United States , Vulnerable Populations
2.
Med Lav ; 112(6): 486-495, 2021 Dec 23.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1596770

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Depression, anxiety, psychological distress, and poor sleep quality increased in healthcare workers (HCWs) during the COVID-19 pandemic. The aim of the study was to assess levels of psychological distress in Umbrian HCWs during the COVID-19 Phase 1 lockdown along with exploring the relationship between sociodemographic/occupational factors. METHODS: Data on sociodemographic and occupational characteristics, change of job description, economic losses and emergency involvement and SARS-CoV2 infections in the workplace were collected using an anonymous online survey sent by healthcare professional associations. Data concerning psychological healthcare distress, were collected anonymously using BIAS 20 (stress balance) and Depression Anxiety Stress Scales (DASS-21). RESULTS: One thousand and one healthcare workers responded to the questionnaire. Biological risk at work was perceived by all HCWs, less so from psychologists and more so from those working in hospitals. Stress symptoms (DASS21 >14) were associated with a younger age group (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.97-0.99) and less work experience (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.96-0.99). Younger age was also associated with anxiety symptoms (DASS 21 >7) (OR 0.98; 95% CI 0.97-0.99), as well as graduate/post graduate education level (OR 2.04; 95% CI 1.14-3.63). Working as an independent contractor was a risk factor for high stress health impact (OR 2.00; CI 1.40-2.86) and stress (OR 1.87; CI 1.20-2.92), anxiety (OR 1.89; CI 1.22-2.92) and depression (OR 1.57; CI 1.10-2.22) symptoms. CONCLUSIONS: Our study showed a possible relationship between healthcare type of employment and distress symptoms during Covid19 pandemic phase 1. Results of our study should be confirmed in other Italian healthcare settings and could serve as a preliminarily baseline for multidisciplinary Italian collaboration.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety/etiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Depression/etiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , RNA, Viral , SARS-CoV-2
3.
Tohoku J Exp Med ; 255(4): 283-289, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1572184

ABSTRACT

The novel coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic has spread throughout the world. Poor mental health has been reported among healthcare professionals responding to COVID-19. However, no study has examined the impact of COVID-19-related workplace bullying or patient aggression on the mental health of healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak. This study examined the prevalence of COVID-19-related workplace bullying and patient aggression and its association with psychological distress among healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak in Japan. This was a cross-sectional study conducted from May 22 to 26, 2020, inviting participants (n = 1,421) from an online survey of full-time employees. We limited the sample to healthcare professionals for further analyses. Using an online self-report questionnaire, workplace bullying and patient aggression related to COVID-19 was measured using nine items with dichotomous response options. Psychological distress was measured using the Japanese version of Brief Job Stress Questionnaire. Among 1,032 participants (72.6%) who completed the survey, 111 healthcare professionals were identified. Among them, 19 participants (17.1%) had experienced any COVID-19-related workplace bullying or patient aggression: 11 participants (9.9%) had experienced any workplace bullying and 12 participants (10.8%) had experienced any patient aggression. Multiple linear regression analysis showed that any bullying or patient aggression related to COVID-19 significantly correlated with psychological distress. It was suggested that a non-negligible proportion of participants experienced workplace bullying or patient aggression related to COVID-19. Preventing and reducing workplace bullying and patient aggression may be effective in improving mental health of healthcare professionals during the COVID-19 outbreak.


Subject(s)
Aggression/psychology , Bullying , COVID-19/psychology , Health Personnel/psychology , Occupational Stress/complications , Psychological Distress , Workplace/psychology , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology
4.
JMIR Public Health Surveill ; 7(10): e25489, 2021 10 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1484946

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: The COVID-19 outbreak had a severe impact on health care workers' psychological health. It is important to establish a process for psychological assessment and intervention for health care workers during epidemics. OBJECTIVE: We investigated risk factors associated with psychological impacts for each health care worker group, to help optimize psychological interventions for health care workers in countries affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Respondents (n=1787) from 2 hospitals in Korea completed a web-based survey during the period from April 14 to 30, 2020. The web-based survey collected demographic information, psychiatric history, and responses to the 9-item Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics (SAVE-9), 9-item Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9), and 7-item Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7) scales. We performed logistic regression to assess contributing factors as predictor variables, using health care workers' depression as outcome variables. RESULTS: Among 1783 health care workers, nursing professionals had significantly higher levels of depression (PHQ-9 score: meannurse 5.5, SD 4.6; meanother 3.8, SD 4.2; P<.001), general anxiety (GAD-7 score: meannurse 4.0, SD 4.1; meanother 2.7, SD 3.6; P<.001), and virus-related anxiety symptoms (SAVE-9 score: meannurse 21.6, SD 5.9; meanother 18.6, SD 6.3; P<.001). Among nursing professionals, single workers reported more severe depressive symptoms than married workers (PHQ-9 score ≥10; meannurse 20.3%; meanother 14.1%; P=.02), and junior (<40 years) workers reported more anxiety about the viral epidemic (SAVE-9 anxiety score; meannurse 15.6, SD 4.1; meanother 14.7, SD 4.4; P=.002). Logistic regression revealed that hospital (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.45, 95% CI 1.06-1.99), nursing professionals (adjusted OR 1.37, 95% CI 1.02-1.98), single workers (adjusted OR 1.51, 95% CI 1.05-2.16), higher stress and anxiety to the viral infection (high SAVE-9 score, adjusted OR 1.20, 95% CI 1.17-1.24), and past psychiatric history (adjusted OR 3.26, 95% CI 2.15-4.96) were positively associated with depression. CONCLUSIONS: Psychological support and interventions should be considered for health care workers, especially nursing professionals, those who are single, and those with high SAVE-9 scores.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Anxiety/epidemiology , Anxiety Disorders/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/epidemiology , Health Personnel , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Republic of Korea/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
5.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 277-285, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462199

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Responsibility of general practitioners (GPs) in delivering safe and effective care is always high but during the COVID-19 pandemic they face even growing pressure that might result in unbearable stress load (allostatic overload, AO) leading to disease. OBJECTIVES: We aimed to measure AO of Hungarian GPs during the COVID-19 pandemic and explore their recreational resources to identify potential protective factors against stress load. METHODS: In a mixed-method design, Fava's clinimetric approach to AO was applied alongside the Psychosocial Index (PSI); Kellner's symptom questionnaire (SQ) to measure depression, anxiety, hostility and somatisation and the Public Health Surveillance Well-being Scale (PHS-WB) to determine mental, social, and physical well-being. Recreational resources were mapped. Besides Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests, regression analysis was applied to identify explanatory variables of AO. RESULTS: Data of 228 GPs (68% females) were analysed. Work-related changes caused the biggest challenges leading to AO in 60% of the sample. While female sex (OR: 1.99; CI: 1.06; 3.74, p = 0.032) and other life stresses (OR: 1.4; CI: 1.2; 1.6, p < 0.001) associated with increased odds of AO, each additional day with 30 min for recreation purposes associated with 20% decreased odds (OR: 0.838; CI: 0.72; 0.97, p = 0.020). 3-4 days a week when time was ensured for recreation associated with elevated mental and physical well-being, while 5-7 days associated with lower depressive and anxiety symptoms, somatisation, and hostility. CONCLUSION: Under changing circumstances, resilience improvement through increasing time spent on recreation should be emphasised to prevent GPs from the adverse health consequences of stress load.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , General Practitioners/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Hungary , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Recreation , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 10 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1458416

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, hospitality employees face a tremendous amount of job stress due to the decline in revenue and close contact with people. This study has three aims: first, to analyse the status quo of organizational-climate job stress on employee wellness in the hospitality industry during COVID-19; second, to discuss the correlation between organizational-climate job stress and employee wellness in the hospitality industry; and third, to analyze the associations between of personal background and organizational climate on job stress and wellness in the hospitality industry. This research uses a survey method to examine these issues. Participants were employees of franchise hotel branches in Taipei City, which yielded 295 effective sample sizes from five chain hotels. The personal background factor questionnaire, organizational climate questionnaire, job stress questionnaire, and wellness questionnaire served as the main research tools. In this study, Factor analysis, Pearson Correlation and Multiple Regression Analysis were used for sample analysis. The results revealed a significant relationship between organizational-climate job stress with wellness. Personal background factors, organizational climate, and job stress would affect the wellness of employees. As a result, the present research provides empirical evidence for the impact of organizational climate and job stress on employee wellness in the hospitality industry in Taiwan during COVID-19. The study's findings, as well as its theoretical and practical implications, are discussed. The main contribution of this study is that the results serve as a reference for hospitality business owners to design better organizational environments for their employees, plan human-resource-related strategies, and provide training for their employees during a pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Organizational Culture , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Taiwan/epidemiology
7.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Oct 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444218

ABSTRACT

The economic downturn due to the COVID-19 pandemic disproportionately impacted the food service industry-one of the largest workforce sectors in the United States. The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the occupational stressors experienced by restaurant and food service workers during the COVID-19 pandemic through a detailed assessment of their lived experiences. Thematic analysis was used to identify patterns within data from sixteen semi-structured interviews with people employed or recently employed in the restaurant industry during July of 2020. Five themes were highlighted including fear of being exposed to the COVID-19 virus while working under inadequate safety policies, job insecurity, inconsistent pay and hours and a lack of health benefits and paid time off, all of which increased occupational stress and led to uncertainty if respondents would return to the restaurant industry. Hardships associated with the pandemic were mitigated by the support and connections fostered by the communities built within the restaurants. Results led to several recommendations to address the social and economic contributors to occupational stress at the structural and population levels which can be used in the current and post-pandemic workplace.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Occupational Stress , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Restaurants , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
8.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(19)2021 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1444209

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate nursing professionalism as a mediating factor in the relationship between resilience and job stress levels for nurses working in long-term care hospitals during the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was conducted from January to March 2021 in seven long-term care hospitals in the Seoul metropolitan area to measure resilience, nursing professionalism, and job stress among nurses. Simple and multiple regression analyses along with the Sobel test were performed to verify the mediating effect of nursing professionalism. RESULTS: Data from 200 nurses were included in the final analysis. Results showed that individual and occupational characteristics could lead to differences in nurses' resilience, job stress levels, and nursing professionalism. Nursing professionalism had a significant mediating effect on the relationship between resilience and job stress levels. The effect of resilience on job stress levels was significant (ß = -0.16, p = 0.024). After controlling for nursing professionalism, the effect declined and was not statistically significant (ß = -0.09, p = 0.251). CONCLUSION: There is a need to increase individual resilience and nursing professionalism through intervention programs and policy proposals to manage job stress among long-term care hospital nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Nursing Staff, Hospital , Occupational Stress , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals , Humans , Job Satisfaction , Long-Term Care , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Professionalism , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
9.
Sch Psychol ; 36(5): 367-376, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1442726

ABSTRACT

The purpose of this study was to explore how returning to teaching during the Coronavirus disease (COVID-19) pandemic impacted teachers' stress and anxiety. Specifically, the study investigated how teachers' anxiety changed during the first month of school. Additionally, the study explored the association of teachers' stress and anxiety and predictor variables for changes in teacher anxiety while teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic. The present study included 329 elementary teachers from across the United States who completed a survey during the first week of October 2020. The results found that most teachers saw no change or an increase in anxiety during the first month. Significant predictors of increased teacher anxiety included stress and communication within the school, with virtual instruction teachers having the most increase in anxiety. In comparison, the no change in anxiety group included significant predictors of stress, virtual instruction, and communication within the school. The present study provides applicable information to schools and districts as there is limited empirical research on the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on teachers. Teachers are working as frontline workers during the pandemic; thus, schools and districts need to monitor teacher stress and anxiety during the COVID-19 pandemic and provide the necessary support. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2021 APA, all rights reserved).


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Education, Distance/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , School Teachers/psychology , School Teachers/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Schools/statistics & numerical data , United States/epidemiology
10.
J Korean Med Sci ; 36(36): e262, 2021 Sep 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406817

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: This study explored the clinical variables related to public workers' stress and anxiety regarding the viral epidemic, and the mediating effect of resilience on the relationship between their depression and anxiety in response to coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A total of 938 public workers answered anonymous questionnaires in May 2020. The survey included rating scales such as the Stress and Anxiety to Viral Epidemics-9 (SAVE-9), Patients Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Generalized Anxiety Disorder-7 (GAD-7), and Connor-Davidson Resilience Scale 2 items (CD-RISC 2), and subjects also answered whether they were employed in COVID-19 related fields. RESULTS: Married, female, junior, public workers reported a higher level of stress and anxiety in response to the viral epidemic. Furthermore, high levels of stress and anxiety toward the epidemic are defined by high PHQ-9, high GAD-7, and low CD-RISC 2 scores. It could also be seen that resilience mediated the effect of depression in public workers and their stress and anxiety levels toward the epidemic. CONCLUSION: It is important to reduce the psychological burden of public workers and manage their mental health to help them cope with the epidemic wisely and efficiently. Among many mental health factors, psychological resilience represents an essential target for psychological intervention among public workers.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Retrospective Studies , Young Adult
11.
Ann R Coll Surg Engl ; 103(8): 589-598, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379815

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Otolaryngology health personnel are at high risk of acquiring COVID-19 disease and, hence, are likely to have high stress levels. This study was designed to evaluate the feedback of otolaryngology healthcare workers in ENT departments who are managing patients in the coronavirus pandemic. METHODS: A questionnaire focused on all aspects of healthcare delivery was completed by otolaryngology healthcare workers. RESULTS: The findings, based on statistical analyses, included high stress levels and inadequate disease-related information in these workers. CONCLUSIONS: Healthcare authorities need to take care of issues related to mental health in healthcare professionals in addition to spreading awareness about safe practices. Further studies are needed to continuously monitor feedback from personnel as the coronavirus pandemic unravels in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Clinical Competence , Health Personnel , Otolaryngology , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Personnel, Hospital , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Young Adult
12.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(16)2021 Aug 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348638

ABSTRACT

This study compared the impact on mental health and the psychosocial perceptions of medical residents and healthcare workers (HCWs) in a hospital after the first peak of the SARS-CoV2 outbreak in France. A validated version of the SATIN questionnaire with a modified scoring system was used to collect data on health and psychosocial factors. This questionnaire was sent to all workers at the hospital in July 2020 and was self-administered online. Using a multivariate multinomial regression model, the study included demographic variables such as age, gender, years at workplace and the relevant of covariate as HCW status. One thousand, four hundred and six questionnaires were available for analysis including 393 non-HCWs, 891 HCWs and 122 medical residents. Medical resident status is a risk factor for stress (OR 4.77 [2.48-9.18] p < 0.001), worse global health (OR 4 [1.7-9.6] p < 0.001) and mental health (OR 2.58 [1.3-5.1] p = 0.02), negative perception of work demand (OR 8.25 [3.5-19.6] p <0.001), work activity environment (OR 3.18 [1.5-6.7] p = 0.02) and organizational context (OR 4.9 [2.38-10.4] p <0.001). Action on collective support, protection equipment, organizational context and framework are important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel/psychology , Internship and Residency , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Disease Outbreaks , France , Humans
13.
Acta Otolaryngol ; 141(8): 791-795, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1338590

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Health care workers (HCW) at otorhinolaryngological departments have an increased risk of contracting COVID-19, due to aerosol-inducing diagnostic and surgical procedures in the airways. The ongoing exposure to physical and psychological stressors could impact the mental health of HCW. AIM/OBJECTIVE: To investigate the impact on mental health in an otorhinolaryngological department during the COVID-19 pandemic. MATERIALS/METHOD: Cross-sectional questionnaire study, assessing symptoms of depression (PHQ-9) and anxiety (GAD-10). Physicians, nurses, and secretaries were included at a tertiary department of otorhinolaryngology in the Capital Region of Denmark during the COVID-19 lockdown in spring 2020. RESULTS: Positive screenings for stress reactions were found in 22% for depressive symptoms and 15.5% anxiety. 27% feared becoming infected, 47% feared infecting their families in relation to work. 27% felt others were distancing from them, and 38% isolated themselves from others because of their work. Women had an odds ratio of 9.18 (CI 1.49-179) for depressive stress reactions. CONCLUSION: HCW were primarily concerned with transmitting COVID-19 to their relatives. Secondarily, there was a concern about becoming infected despite feeling adequately protected by personal protective equipment. Women were at higher risk of more severe depressive symptoms when corrected for professions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/organization & administration , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Otolaryngology , Personnel, Hospital/psychology , Adult , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Denmark , Female , Hospital Departments , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Prevalence , Surveys and Questionnaires , Tertiary Care Centers
14.
Med Glas (Zenica) ; 18(2): 493-498, 2021 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1335469

ABSTRACT

Aim To evaluate and assess knowledge and perception, as well as factors related to the occurrence of anxiety among frontliners, especially resident doctors working in emergency room (ER). Methods This multivariate study was conducted with cross-sectional approach involving 80 eligible subjects (based on inclusion and exclusion criteria) that are consecutively assigned and assessed with GAD-7 questionnaire. The study was held in ER of Universitas Sumatera Utara affiliated teaching hospital from May to August 2020. Results Our study found that variables such as nuptial status (p=0.032), seniority level (p=0.037), history of direct exposure to COVID-19 patients (p=0.001) and weekly work duration(p=0.002) were all statistically significant to correlate with the occurrence of anxiety among resident doctors assigned to work in ER. Conclusion Acknowledgement of these factors might lead to proper and targeted support system strategies to address the anxiety issues among doctors, particularly those who work in ER during COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Emergency Service, Hospital , Physicians/psychology , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Hospitals, Teaching , Humans , Indonesia , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics
15.
Eur J Gen Pract ; 27(1): 184-190, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1334099

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals (HCPs) in family medicine (FM) in Croatia work in a demanding environment caused by the SARS-CoV-2 pandemic. Besides particular circumstances in healthcare, an unknown virus, social distancing, and homeschooling, the capital was hit with the earthquake during the lockdown. OBJECTIVES: To assess the prevalence of stress, anxiety, depression, posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and the influence of demographic characteristics, professional differences, medical history, and specific stressors on the psychological outcomes. METHODS: A cross-sectional study with the online questionnaire containing the Depression, Anxiety and Stress Scale (DASS-21) and the Impact of Event Scale-Revised (IES-R) was conducted from 1st to 15 May 2020 in FM. RESULTS: HCPs (534, 35% response rate), predominantly female (84.5%), participated in the research. High prevalence of stress (30.9%), anxiety (33.1%), depression (30.7%), and PTSD (33.0%) were found. Female participants had higher results in the anxiety subscale of DASS-21 and IES-R scores. Pre-existing conditions were associated with higher levels of stress, anxiety, depression, and PTSD. The IES-R score for PTSD showed borderline correlation (p = 0.053) with working in regions with the highest incidence of COVID-19. Having schoolchildren made a difference on a stress subscale in DASS-21 (p < 0.043), but the earthquake did not have an impact. CONCLUSION: Family physicians and nurses in FM in Croatia are under a great mental load during the COVID-19 outbreak. Results suggest that HCPs of the female sex, with pre-existing chronic conditions, work in regions with a high incidence of SARS-CoV-2 or have schoolchildren at greater risk of the poor psychological outcome.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/etiology , COVID-19/psychology , Depression/etiology , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/etiology , Physicians, Family/psychology , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/etiology , Adolescent , Adult , Anxiety/diagnosis , Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Croatia/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Depression/diagnosis , Depression/epidemiology , Disasters , Disease Outbreaks/prevention & control , Earthquakes , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Logistic Models , Male , Middle Aged , Occupational Stress/diagnosis , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Prevalence , Psychological Tests , Risk Factors , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/diagnosis , Stress Disorders, Post-Traumatic/epidemiology , Young Adult
16.
BMJ Open Respir Res ; 8(1)2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1327681

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Nurses have been at the forefront of the pandemic response, involved in extensive coordination of services, screening, vaccination and front-line work in respiratory, emergency and intensive care environments. The nature of this work is often intense and stress-provoking with an inevitable psychological impact on nurses and all healthcare workers. This study focused on nurses working in respiratory areas with the aim of identifying and characterising the self-reported issues that exacerbated or alleviated their concerns during the first wave of the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online survey was developed consisting of 90 questions using a mixture of open-ended and closed questions. Participant demographic data were also collected (age, gender, ethnicity, number of years qualified, details of long-term health conditions, geographical location, nursing background/role and home life). The online survey was disseminated via social media and professional respiratory societies (British Thoracic Society, Primary Care Respiratory Society, Association of Respiratory Nurse Specialists) over a 3-week period in May 2020 and the survey closed on 1 June 2020. RESULTS: The study highlights the experiences of nurses caring for respiratory patients during the first wave of the pandemic in early 2020. Concerns were expressed over the working environment, the supply and availability of adequate protective personal equipment, the quality of care individuals were able to deliver, and the impact on mental health to nurses and their families. A high number provided free-text comments around their worries and concerns about the impact on their household; these included bringing the virus home, the effect on family members worrying about them, mental health and the impact of changing working patterns, and managing with children. Although both formal and informal support were available, there were inconsistencies in provision, highlighting the importance of nursing leadership and management in ensuring equity of access to services. CONCLUSIONS: Support for staff is essential both throughout the pandemic and afterwards, and it is important that preparation of individuals regarding building resilience is recognised. It is also clear that psychological support and services for nurses and the wider healthcare team need to be available and quickly convened in the event of similar major incidents, either global or local.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Resilience, Psychological , Adolescent , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Leadership , Male , Middle Aged , Nurses/statistics & numerical data , Occupational Stress/prevention & control , Occupational Stress/psychology , Pandemics/prevention & control , Personal Protective Equipment , Psychosocial Support Systems , Respiratory Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Self Report/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
19.
Intensive Crit Care Nurs ; 67: 103107, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275346

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To determine the level of occupational stress in intensive care nurses during the COVID-19 pandemic and factors of perceived stress. METHODS: The study had a descriptive design. A total of 262 nurses working in adult intensive care units (ICUs) across Turkey during the COVID-19 pandemic constituted the sample. Data were collected by an online survey and the Perceived Stress Scale-14. Descriptive statistics, independent t-test, one- way analysis of variance, regression analysis and Bonferroni test were used for data analysis. RESULTS: Percentage of nurses with moderate level of occupational stress was 62%. High working hours and nurse:patient ratios, heavy workload and failure in patient treatment were the main factors of occupational stress. Level of occupational stress was affected by gender, number of children, years of experience in intensive care and the type of work shift. CONCLUSION: Intensive care nurses in Turkey experienced moderate stress during the COVID-19 pandemic. Interventions to prevent occupational stress among intensive care nurses in the long run might be implemented.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Nurses , Occupational Stress , Adult , Child , Critical Care , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
20.
J Psychosoc Nurs Ment Health Serv ; 59(8): 31-42, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1264592

ABSTRACT

The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has strained the health system worldwide. Nurses caring for patients with COVID-19 reported experiencing significant work-related stress and anxiety. The current online descriptive cross-sectional correlational study aimed to investigate work-related stress and anxiety among nurses caring for patients with COVID-19. Data were collected from 240 nurses using the Stress Overload Scale and Self-Rated Anxiety Scale. Average stress and anxiety scores were 34.96 (SD = 5.85) and 52.8 (SD = 5.48), respectively. Statistically significant differences were found in mean stress overload and anxiety scores based on gender, professional title, average working hours per week, working area, and presence of fear of being infected with COVID-19. These findings suggest the need to promote well-being in nurses and assist nurses and other health care workers experiencing mental and psychological health problems in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 59(8), 31-42.].


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Nurses/psychology , Occupational Stress/epidemiology , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Middle Aged , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
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