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1.
BMJ ; 375: e065834, 2021 12 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1599220

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: To describe the rates for consulting a general practitioner (GP) for sequelae after acute covid-19 in patients admitted to hospital with covid-19 and those managed in the community, and to determine how the rates change over time for patients in the community and after vaccination for covid-19. DESIGN: Population based study. SETTING: 1392 general practices in England contributing to the Clinical Practice Research Datalink Aurum database. PARTICIPANTS: 456 002 patients with a diagnosis of covid-19 between 1 August 2020 and 14 February 2021 (44.7% men; median age 61 years), admitted to hospital within two weeks of diagnosis or managed in the community, and followed-up for a maximum of 9.2 months. A negative control group included individuals without covid-19 (n=38 511) and patients with influenza before the pandemic (n=21 803). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Comparison of rates for consulting a GP for new symptoms, diseases, prescriptions, and healthcare use in individuals admitted to hospital and those managed in the community, separately, before and after covid-19 infection, using Cox regression and negative binomial regression for healthcare use. The analysis was repeated for the negative control and influenza cohorts. In individuals in the community, outcomes were also described over time after a diagnosis of covid-19, and compared before and after vaccination for individuals who were symptomatic after covid-19 infection, using negative binomial regression. RESULTS: Relative to the negative control and influenza cohorts, patients in the community (n=437 943) had significantly higher GP consultation rates for multiple sequelae, and the most common were loss of smell or taste, or both (adjusted hazard ratio 5.28, 95% confidence interval 3.89 to 7.17, P<0.001); venous thromboembolism (3.35, 2.87 to 3.91, P<0.001); lung fibrosis (2.41, 1.37 to 4.25, P=0.002), and muscle pain (1.89, 1.63 to 2.20, P<0.001); and also for healthcare use after a diagnosis of covid-19 compared with 12 months before infection. For absolute proportions, the most common outcomes ≥4 weeks after a covid-19 diagnosis in patients in the community were joint pain (2.5%), anxiety (1.2%), and prescriptions for non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (1.2%). Patients admitted to hospital (n=18 059) also had significantly higher GP consultation rates for multiple sequelae, most commonly for venous thromboembolism (16.21, 11.28 to 23.31, P<0.001), nausea (4.64, 2.24 to 9.21, P<0.001), prescriptions for paracetamol (3.68, 2.86 to 4.74, P<0.001), renal failure (3.42, 2.67 to 4.38, P<0.001), and healthcare use after a covid-19 diagnosis compared with 12 months before infection. For absolute proportions, the most common outcomes ≥4 weeks after a covid-19 diagnosis in patients admitted to hospital were venous thromboembolism (3.5%), joint pain (2.7%), and breathlessness (2.8%). In patients in the community, anxiety and depression, abdominal pain, diarrhoea, general pain, nausea, chest tightness, and tinnitus persisted throughout follow-up. GP consultation rates were reduced for all symptoms, prescriptions, and healthcare use, except for neuropathic pain, cognitive impairment, strong opiates, and paracetamol use in patients in the community after the first vaccination dose for covid-19 relative to before vaccination. GP consultation rates were also reduced for ischaemic heart disease, asthma, and gastro-oesophageal disease. CONCLUSIONS: GP consultation rates for sequelae after acute covid-19 infection differed between patients with covid-19 who were admitted to hospital and those managed in the community. For individuals in the community, rates of some sequelae decreased over time but those for others, such as anxiety and depression, persisted. Rates of some outcomes decreased after vaccination in this group.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Community Health Services , General Practitioners , Hospitalization , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Venous Thromboembolism/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Proportional Hazards Models , State Medicine , United Kingdom/epidemiology , Venous Thromboembolism/etiology
2.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(41): e27399, 2021 Oct 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501200

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has intensified globally since its origin in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Many medical groups across the United States have experienced extraordinary clinical and financial pressures due to COVID-19 as a result of a decline in elective inpatient and outpatient surgical procedures and most nonurgent elective physician visits. The current study reports how our medical group in a metropolitan community in Kentucky rebooted our ambulatory and inpatient services following the guidance of our state's phased reopening. Particular attention focused on the transition between the initial COVID-19 surge and post-COVID-19 surge and how our medical group responded to meet community needs. Ten strategies were incorporated in our medical group, including heightened communication; ambulatory telehealth; safe and clean outpatient environment; marketing; physician, other medical provider, and staff compensation; high quality patient experience; schedule optimization; rescheduling tactics; data management; and primary care versus specialty approaches. These methods are applicable to both the current rebooting stage as well as to a potential resurgence of COVID-19 in the future.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/organization & administration , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/organization & administration , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care, Integrated/organization & administration , Humans , Kentucky/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Sci Prog ; 104(3): 368504211042980, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1430320

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: This study aimed to evaluate the truthfulness of patients about their pre-appointment COVID-19 screening tests at a dental clinic. METHODS: A total of 613 patients were recruited for the study from the dental clinic at the Faculty of Dentistry, Najran University, Saudi Arabia. The data collection was done in three parts from the patients who visited the hospital to receive dental treatment. The first part included the socio-demographic characteristics of the patients and the COVID-19 swab tests performed within the past 14 days. The second part was the clinical examination, and the third part was a confirmation of the swab test taken by the patient by checking the Hesen website using the patient ID. After data collection, statistical analysis was carried out using SPSS 26.0. Descriptive analysis was done and expressed as mean, standard deviation, frequency, and percentage (%). A cross-tabulation, also described as a contingency table, was used to identify trends and patterns across data and explain the correlation between different variables. RESULTS: It was seen from the status of the swab test within 14 days of the patient's arrival at the hospital for the dental treatment that 18 (2.9%) patients lied about the pre-treatment swab test within 14 days, and 595 (97.1%) were truthful. The observed and expected counts showed across genders and diagnosis a statistically significant difference (p < 0.001), and there was no significant difference seen across different age groups (p = 0.064) of the patients. CONCLUSIONS: Dental healthcare workers are worried and assume a high risk of COVID-19 infection as the patients are not truthful about the pre-treatment COVID-19 swab test. Routine rapid tests on patients and the healthcare staff are a feasible option for lowering overall risks.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Patient Compliance/statistics & numerical data , Truth Disclosure/ethics , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19 Testing , Dental Offices/ethics , Dental Offices/organization & administration , Female , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Nasopharynx/virology , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Patient Compliance/psychology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology
7.
Rheumatol Int ; 41(10): 1755-1761, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1384393

ABSTRACT

The SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic resulted in major disruptions to medical care. We aimed to understand changes in outpatient care delivery and use of telemedicine in U.S. rheumatology practices during this period. Rheumatology Informatics System Effectiveness (RISE) is a national, EHR-enabled registry that passively collects data on all patients seen by participating practices. Included practices were required to have been participating in RISE from January 2019 through August 2020 (N = 213). We compared total visit counts and telemedicine visits during March-August 2020 to March-August 2019 and stratified by locations in states with shelter-in-place (SIP) orders. We assessed characteristics of patients within each practice, including primary rheumatic diagnosis and disease activity scores, where available. We included 213 practices with 945,160 patients. Overall, we found visit counts decreased by 10.9% (from 1,302,455 to 1,161,051) between March and August 2020 compared to 2019; this drop was most dramatic during the month of April (- 22.3%). Telemedicine visits increased from 0% to a mean of 12.1%. Practices in SIP states had more dramatic decreases in visits, (11.5% vs. 5.3%). We found no major differences in primary diagnoses or disease activity across the two periods. We detected a meaningful decrease in rheumatology visits in March-August 2020 during the SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic compared to the year prior with a concomitant increase in the use of telemedicine. Future work should address possible adverse consequences to patient outcomes due to decreased contact with clinicians.


Subject(s)
Health Services Accessibility/statistics & numerical data , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Rheumatology/organization & administration , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Registries , Rheumatology/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
8.
Healthc Q ; 24(2): 12-14, 2021 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1323458

ABSTRACT

The Canadian Institute for Health Information has compiled health system data to investigate the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on Canada's healthcare system. Information was aggregated from four distinct sectors of care: emergency department visits, in-patient hospital stays, physician care and home care. Across the sectors, there were two compelling themes: rapid transformation and change in human behaviour.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Canada/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/statistics & numerical data , Home Care Services/statistics & numerical data , Hospitalization/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
9.
Psychiatry Res ; 301: 113966, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1201985

ABSTRACT

Most research evaluating telehealth psychiatric treatment has been conducted in outpatient settings. There is a lack of research assessing the efficacy of telehealth treatment in more acute, intensive treatment settings such as a partial hospital. In the face of the COVID-19 pandemic, much of ambulatory behavioral health treatment has transitioned to a telehealth, or virtual, format. In the present report from the Rhode Island Methods to Improve Diagnostic Assessment and Services (MIDAS) project, we compared patient satisfaction of partial hospital services delivered via telehealth to in-person treatment provided to patients treated prior to the COVID-19 outbreak. The sample included 240 patients who were treated virtually from May, 2020 to October, 2020, and a comparison group of 240 patients who were treated in the in-person partial program a year earlier. Patients completed self-administered measures of patient satisfaction after the initial evaluation and at the end of treatment. For both the in-person and telehealth methods of delivering partial hospital level of care, patients were highly satisfied with the initial diagnostic evaluation and were optimistic at admission that treatment would be helpful. At the completion of treatment, both groups were highly satisfied with all components of the treatment program and almost all would recommend treatment to a friend or family member. Thus, patient satisfaction was as high with telehealth partial hospital treatment as with in-person treatment.


Subject(s)
Behavior Therapy/methods , COVID-19 , Mental Disorders/therapy , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Patient Satisfaction , Personal Satisfaction , Telemedicine/methods , Ambulatory Care , Ambulatory Care Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care , Health Services Accessibility , Hospitalization , Hospitals , Humans , Male , Mental Disorders/psychology , Outpatients , Pandemics , Rhode Island , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Int J Pediatr Otorhinolaryngol ; 145: 110712, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1196720

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of telehealth visits and compare office-based visits for pediatric patients undergoing evaluation of recurrent acute otitis media or sleep-disordered breathing. METHODS: A retrospective cohort study compared telehealth patients with matched controls seen in the office. The feasibility of a thorough patient evaluation in a single telehealth visit without a follow-up office visit was assessed. Both groups were also compared for completeness of physical exam, management, follow-up recommendations, and correlation of physical exam findings with intraoperative findings. RESULTS: 100 children [mean age (SD) = 20.7 (15.6) months] with a chief complaint of recurrent acute otitis media and 128 children [5.4 (3.2) years] with a chief complaint of sleep-disordered breathing were evaluated. Recommendations for surgery, additional studies, or routine follow-up were similar between telehealth and office-based groups. Physical exam feasibility was significantly different for the nasal cavity, oropharynx, and middle ear (P < .001). Patients who underwent office-based consultation were much more likely to have findings of middle ear fluid at the time of tympanostomy tube placement (79.3% vs 39.3%, P = .002). There was no significant difference between preoperative and intraoperative tonsil size discrepancies (P = .749). CONCLUSION: Telehealth can be used successfully for the evaluation of pediatric patients with sleep-disordered breathing; however, reliance on history alone may result in unnecessary tympanostomy tube placement in patients with recurrent acute otitis media. Physical examination of the oropharynx, nasal cavity, and middle ear via telehealth presents a unique challenge in pediatric otolaryngology.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Otolaryngology , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Child, Preschool , Humans , Infant , Middle Ear Ventilation , Retrospective Studies
11.
Ann Fam Med ; 19(4): 351-355, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1133663

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic recovery will require a broad and coordinated effort for infection testing, immunity determination, and vaccination. With the advent of several COVID-19 vaccines, the dissemination and delivery of COVID-19 immunization across the nation is of concern. Previous immunization delivery patterns may reveal important components of a comprehensive and sustainable effort to immunize everyone in the nation. METHODS: The delivery of vaccinations were enumerated by provider type using 2017 Medicare Part B Fee-For-Service data and the 2013-2017 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey. The delivery of these services was examined at the service, physician, and visit level. RESULTS: In 2017 Medicare Part B Fee-For-Service, primary care physicians provided the largest share of services for vaccinations (46%), followed closely by mass immunizers (45%), then nurse practitioners/physician assistants (NP/PAs) (5%). The Medical Expenditure Panel Survey showed that primary care physicians provided most clinical visits for vaccination (54% of all visits). CONCLUSIONS: Primary care physicians have played a crucial role in delivery of vaccinations to the US population, including the elderly, between 2012-2017. These findings indicate primary care practices may be a crucial element of vaccine counseling and delivery in the upcoming COVID-19 recovery and immunization efforts in the United States.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Immunization Programs , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Vaccination/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Medicare Part B/statistics & numerical data , Nurse Practitioners/statistics & numerical data , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Physician Assistants/statistics & numerical data , Physicians, Primary Care/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Surge Capacity , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States
12.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(Suppl): S162-S169, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099996

ABSTRACT

The Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID 19) pandemic has resulted in a rapid shift to telehealth and many services that need in-person care have been avoided. Yet, as practices and payment policies return to a new normal, there will be many questions about what proportion of visits should be done in-person vs telehealth. Using the 2016 National Ambulatory Medical Survey (NAMCS), we estimated what proportion of visits were amenable to telehealth before COVID-19 as a guide. We divided services into those that needed in-person care and those that could be done via telehealth. Any visit that included at least 1 service where in-person care was needed was counted as an in-person only visit. We then calculated what proportion of reported visits and services in 2016 could have been provided via telehealth, as well as what proportion of in-person only services were done by primary care. We found that 66% of all primary care visits reported in NAMCS in 2016 required an in-person service. 90% of all wellness visits and immunizations were done in primary care offices, as were a quarter of all Papanicolaou smears. As practices reopen, patients will need to catch up on many of the in-person only visits that were postponed such as Papanicolaou smears and wellness visits. At the same time, patients and clinicians now accustomed to telehealth may have reservations about returning to in-person only visits. Our estimates may provide a guide to practices as they navigate how to deliver care in a post-COVID-19 environment.


Subject(s)
Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Ambulatory Care/statistics & numerical data , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/trends
13.
J Am Board Fam Med ; 34(Suppl): S147-S151, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1099995

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Examine use of office resources by primary care patients who were initially evaluated through telehealth, telephone, or in-person encounters. METHODS: Retrospective electronic health record review on patients seen in March 2020 for evaluation of potential COVID-19 symptoms, to assess the total number of interactions with physicians and office staff. RESULTS: Of 202 patients, 89 (44%) had initial telehealth, 55 (27%) telephone, and 52 (26%) in-person encounters. Patients initially evaluated through telehealth, telephone, and in-person encounters had a mean of 6.1 (S.D. = 3.7), 5.2 (S.D. = 3.6), and 4.5 (S.D. = 3.0) total interactions with the office, respectively (P = .03), and 9%, 12.7%, and 19.2%, respectively, had a subsequent in-person or emergency department visit (P = .22). Multivariable analysis showed no differences in number of office interactions based on initial visit type; older patients (95% CI = 0.00-0.07) and those with subjective fevers (95% CI = 1.01-3.01) or shortness of breath (95% CI = 0.23-2.28) had more interactions with the office. CONCLUSION: Primary care providers used virtual visits to care for most patients presenting with potential COVID-19 symptoms, with many patients choosing telephone over telehealth visits. Virtual visits can successfully limit patient exposure to other people, and consideration could be given to increasing its use for patients with potential symptoms of COVID-19.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Primary Health Care/methods , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Telephone/statistics & numerical data , Young Adult
14.
CMAJ ; 193(6): E200-E210, 2021 02 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081757

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Globally, primary care changed dramatically as a result of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. We aimed to understand the degree to which office and virtual primary care changed, and for which patients and physicians, during the initial months of the pandemic in Ontario, Canada. METHODS: This population-based study compared comprehensive, linked primary care physician billing data from Jan. 1 to July 28, 2020, with the same period in 2019. We identified Ontario residents with at least 1 office or virtual (telephone or video) visit during the study period. We compared trends in total physician visits, office visits and virtual visits before COVID-19 with trends after pandemic-related public health measures changed the delivery of care, according to various patient and physician characteristics. We used interrupted time series analysis to compare trends in the early and later halves of the COVID-19 period. RESULTS: Compared with 2019, total primary care visits between March and July 2020 decreased by 28.0%, from 7.66 to 5.51 per 1000 people/day. The smallest declines were among patients with the highest expected health care use (8.3%), those who could not be attributed to a primary care physician (10.2%), and older adults (19.1%). In contrast, total visits in rural areas increased by 6.4%. Office visits declined by 79.1% and virtual care increased 56-fold, comprising 71.1% of primary care physician visits. The lowest uptake of virtual care was among children (57.6%), rural residents (60.6%) and physicians with panels of ≥ 2500 patients (66.0%). INTERPRETATION: Primary care in Ontario saw large shifts from office to virtual care over the first 4 months of the COVID-19 pandemic. Total visits declined least among those with higher health care needs. The determinants and consequences of these major shifts in care require further study.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Primary Health Care/methods , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Remote Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Child , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ontario/epidemiology , Pandemics , Primary Health Care/trends , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Young Adult
16.
Cad. Saúde Pública (Online) ; 36(supl.3): e00181920, 2020. tab, graf
Article in English | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-999873

ABSTRACT

The continent of the Americas has the greatest number of people infected and deaths associated with severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) in the world. Brazil occupies the 2nd position in numbers of infected cases and deaths, preceded only by the United States. Older adults and those with pre-existing chronic illnesses are more vulnerable to the consequences of the virus. The SARS-CoV-2 epidemic has serious consequences for health services. Therefore, an assessment of the pandemic's effect on the older Brazilian population is urgently needed. The study examines the prevalence of COVID-19 related symptoms, care-seeking, and cancellation of surgery or other scheduled medical care among a nationally representative sample of Brazilians aged 50 and over derived from the Brazilian Longitudinal Study of Aging (ELSI-Brazil) and a telephone follow-up survey (the ELSI-COVID-19 initiative) between late May and early June 2020. About 10.4% of older adults reported any fever, dry cough or difficulty breathing in the 30 days prior to the interview, with the highest prevalence in the North region (50%). Among individuals with symptoms, only 33.6% sought care. Individuals living in the South or Southeast regions were significantly less likely to seek care for COVID-19 related symptoms. Nearly one in six participants had to cancel scheduled surgery or other medical care; this proportion was higher among women, those with more education, and people with multiple chronic conditions. This paper is among the first to investigate the effect of COVID-19 on health care use in Brazil among older adults. Results highlight the need to adapt health care delivery (such as through telemedicine) to ensure the continuity of care as well as the urgent need for wide dissemination of information to guide the population on disease prevention measures and how to obtain healthcare when needed.


El continente de las Américas tiene el mayor número de personas infectadas y muertes asociadas con el síndrome respiratorio agudo severo coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) en el mundo. El Brasil ocupa la 2ª posición en número de casos infectados y defunciones, solo precedido por los Estados Unidos. Los adultos mayores y aquellos con enfermedades crónicas preexistentes son más vulnerables a las consecuencias del virus. La epidemia de SARS-CoV-2 tiene graves consecuencias para los servicios de salud. Por lo tanto, se necesita con urgencia una evaluación del efecto de la pandemia en la población brasileña de mayor edad. El estudio examina la prevalencia de COVID-19, sus síntomas asociados, la búsqueda de cuidados, y la cancelación de cirugías -u otros cuidados médicos agendados- en una muestra nacionalmente representativa de brasileños, con una edad de 50 años o más, proveniente del Estudio Brasileño Longitudinal del Envejecimiento (ELSI-Brasil, por sus siglas en portugués), además de una encuesta telefónica de seguimiento (la iniciativa ELSI-COVID-19) entre finales de mayo y principios de junio de 2020. Aproximadamente un 10,4% de los adultos mayores no informaron de tener fiebre, tos seca o dificultad para respirar en los 30 días previos a la entrevista, con la prevalencia más alta en la región Norte (50%). Entre los individuos con síntomas, solamente un 33,6% solicitaron asistencia. Aproximadamente 1 de cada 6 participantes tuvo que cancelar una cirugía agendada u otra intervención médica. Las personas que viven en las regiones Sur o Sudeste tuvieron significativamente menos probabilidad de buscar asistencia médica por síntomas relacionados con la COVID-19. Mujeres, así como los individuos con más educación, y pacientes con múltiples enfermedades crónicas tenían más probabilidades de que se les cancelara la asistencia médica, debido a la pandemia. Este trabajo está entre los primeros en investigar el impacto de la COVID-19 en el uso de los servicios de salud en Brasil entre adultos mayores. Los resultados resaltan la necesidad de adaptar la provisión de asistencia médica, a través de medios como la telemedicina, para superar la denegación de la asistencia necesaria, así como la imperiosa necesidad de un enfoque de salud pública más fuerte para proteger a las personas vulnerables.


O continente americano apresenta o maior número de pessoas infectadas e de mortes associadas à síndrome respiratória grave do coronavírus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) no mundo. O Brasil ocupa a 2ª posição em números de casos de infectados e de óbitos, antecedido somente pelos Estados Unidos. Adultos mais velhos e aqueles com doenças crônicas preexistentes são mais vulneráveis às consequências da infecção. A epidemia do SARS-CoV-2 tem enormes consequências para os serviços de saúde. Portanto, é urgente avaliar o efeito da pandemia na população idosa brasileira. Nosso objetivo foi examinar a prevalência de sintomas da COVID-19, a busca por atenção em saúde em função destes sintomas, e o cancelamento de cirurgias, ou outros procedimentos previamente agendados, por causa da pandemia, em uma amostra representativa de brasileiros adultos com 50 anos ou mais, participantes do Estudo Longitudinal da Saúde dos Idosos Brasileiros (ELSI-Brasil), que responderam à entrevista telefônica sobre a COVID-19 entre o final de maio e o início de junho de 2020. Entre os participantes, 10,4% informaram ter tido febre, tosse seca ou dificuldades para respirar nos 30 dias anteriores à entrevista telefônica, com maior prevalência na Região Norte (50%). Entre aqueles com qualquer um desses sintomas, somente 33,6% haviam procurado por assistência em saúde; esta proporção foi ainda menor nas regiões Sul e Sudeste. Cerca de 1 entre 6 participantes havia cancelado cirurgias ou outros procedimentos anteriormente agendados; esta proporção foi maior entre as mulheres, entre aqueles com escolaridade mais alta e entre aqueles com múltiplas doenças crônicas. Este trabalho está entre os primeiros a examinar as consequências da epidemia da COVID-19 no uso de serviços de saúde entre brasileiros mais velhos. Os resultados apontam para a necessidade de adaptação da oferta da atenção à saúde para garantir a continuidade dos cuidados necessários durante a epidemia (como telemedicina, por exemplo), bem como a necessidade urgente de ampla divulgação para orientar a população sobre a prevenção da doença e como obter atenção em saúde em caso de necessidade.


Subject(s)
Humans , Female , Aged , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Patient Acceptance of Health Care , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Pandemics , Office Visits/trends , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Socioeconomic Factors , Brazil , Longitudinal Studies , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , SARS-CoV-2 , COVID-19 , Middle Aged
17.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e043151, 2020 12 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-962847

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To describe how the primary healthcare (PHC) in Iceland changed its strategy to handle the COVID-19 pandemic. DESIGN: Descriptive observational study. SETTING: Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland. POPULATION: The Reykjavik area has a total of 233 000 inhabitants. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The number and the mode of consultations carried out. Drug prescriptions and changes in the 10 most common diagnoses made in PHC. Laboratory tests including COVID-19 tests. Average numbers in March and April 2020 compared with the same months in 2018 and 2019. RESULTS: Pragmatic strategies and new tasks were rapidly applied to the clinical work to meet the foreseen healthcare needs caused by the pandemic. The number of daytime consultations increased by 35% or from 780 to 1051/1000 inhabitants (p<0.001) during the study period. Telephone and web-based consultations increased by 127% (p<0.001). The same tendency was observed in out-of-hours services. The number of consultations in maternity and well-child care decreased only by 4% (p=0.003). Changes were seen in the 10 most common diagnoses. Most noteworthy, apart from a high number of COVID-19 suspected disease, was that immunisation, depression, hypothyroidism and lumbago were not among the top 10 diagnoses during the epidemic period. The number of drug prescriptions increased by 10.3% (from 494 to 545 per 1000 inhabitants, p<0.001). The number of prescriptions from telephone and web-based consultations rose by 55.6%. No changes were observed in antibiotics prescriptions. CONCLUSIONS: As the first point of contact in the COVID-19 pandemic, the PHC in Iceland managed to change its strategy swiftly while preserving traditional maternity and well-child care, indicating a very solid PHC with substantial flexibility in its organisation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Practice Patterns, Physicians' , Primary Health Care/organization & administration , COVID-19/diagnosis , Humans , Iceland , Maternal-Child Health Services/organization & administration , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Registries , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data
20.
J Prim Care Community Health ; 11: 2150132720969557, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-919057

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: In this brief report, we characterize pediatric primary care service utilization in metropolitan Chicago over the first 24 weeks of the COVID-19 pandemic response in relation to the comparable time period in 2019. METHODS: We examined retrospective visit and billing data, regardless of payer, from 16 independent pediatric practices that utilize a common electronic medical record platform within an Accountable Care Organization of 252 pediatricians in 71 offices throughout metropolitan Chicago. We categorized visits as Well-Child and Immunization-Only (WC-IO) or Other types and identified visits with a telemedicine billing modifier. Diagnoses for Other visits were tallied and categorized using the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Clinical Classification System. We summarized counts of visits and the proportion of visits with a telemedicine billing modifier in one-week epochs for 2020 compared with 2019. RESULTS: There were 102 942 total visits (72 030 WC-IO; 30 912 Other) in 2020 and 144 672 visits (80 578 WC-IO; 64 094 Other) in 2019. WC-IO visits in 2020 were half of 2019 visits at the start of the Illinois Stay-at-Home Order and returned greater than 90% of 2019 visits in 8 weeks. Other visit types have remained below 70% of 2019 visits. A telemedicine billing modifier peaked in mid-April (21% of all visits) and declined to <10% of all visits in June (Phase 2 reopening). The top 10 most common diagnoses differed between years. CONCLUSIONS: Recovery of well child and immunization visits suggests that practice-level efforts and policy change can ensure children receive recommended care as the pandemic evolves.


Subject(s)
Ambulatory Care , Child Health , Coronavirus Infections , Pandemics , Patient Acceptance of Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Pediatrics/statistics & numerical data , Pneumonia, Viral , Primary Health Care/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Chicago/epidemiology , Child , Child, Preschool , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Electronic Health Records , Humans , Immunization , Infant , Office Visits/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Isolation , Telemedicine
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