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1.
PLoS One ; 16(12): e0261648, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595589

ABSTRACT

Vaccine rejection is a problem severely impacting the global society, especially considering the COVID-19 outbreak. The need to understand the psychological mechanisms underlying the active involvement of the pro-vaccine and anti-vaccine movements is therefore very important both from a theoretical and practical perspective. This paper investigates the group identities of people with positive and negative attitudes towards vaccination, and their attitudes toward general science. A targeted sample study of 192 pro-vaccine and 156 anti-vaccine group members showed that the group identity of pro-vaccine individuals is higher than of anti-vaccine individuals. and that both pro-vaccine and anti-vaccine individuals had a positive attitude toward science. Results are discussed in context of the heterogeneity of motivations causing vaccine rejection and the relation between active involvement in online discussion and group identity.


Subject(s)
Anti-Vaccination Movement , COVID-19 , Pandemics/prevention & control , Vaccination/psychology , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Attitude , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , COVID-19 Vaccines/administration & dosage , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Online Social Networking , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
4.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257291, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1416893

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of a novel coronavirus pneumonia (COVID-19), wherein more than 200 million people have been infected and millions have died, poses a great threat to achieving the United Nations 2030 sustainable development goal (SDGs). Based on the Baidu index of 'novel coronavirus', this paper analyses the spatial and temporal characteristics of and factors that influenced the attention network for COVID-19 from January 9, 2020, to April 15, 2020. The study found that (1) Temporally, the attention in the new coronavirus network showed an upward trend from January 9 to January 29, with the largest increase from January 23 to January 29 and a peak on January 29, and then a slow downward trend. The level of attention in the new coronavirus network was basically flat when comparing January 22 and March 4. (2) Spatially, first, from the perspective of regional differences, the network attention in the eastern and central regions decreased in turn. The network users in the eastern region exhibited the highest attention to the new coronavirus, especially in Guangdong, Shandong, Jiangsu and other provinces and cities. The network attention in Tibet, Xinjiang, Qinghai and Ningxia in the western region was the lowest in terms of the national network attention. Second, from the perspective of interprovincial differences, the attention in the new coronavirus network was highly consistent with the Hu Huanyong line of China's population boundary. The east of the Hu Huanyong line is densely populated, and the network showed high concern, mostly ranking at the third to fifth levels. (3) The number of Internet users in the information technology field, the population, and the culture and age characteristics of individuals are important factors that influence the novel coronavirus attention network.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , Information Dissemination/methods , Internet/statistics & numerical data , Online Social Networking , Spatio-Temporal Analysis , Algorithms , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , China/epidemiology , Epidemics , Geography , Humans , Internet/trends , Models, Theoretical , Public Health/methods , Public Health/statistics & numerical data , Public Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Time Factors
5.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0256175, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1381280

ABSTRACT

Communities in social networks often reflect close social ties between their members and their evolution through time. We propose an approach that tracks two aspects of community evolution in retweet networks: flow of the members in, out and between the communities, and their influence. We start with high resolution time windows, and then select several timepoints which exhibit large differences between the communities. For community detection, we propose a two-stage approach. In the first stage, we apply an enhanced Louvain algorithm, called Ensemble Louvain, to find stable communities. In the second stage, we form influence links between these communities, and identify linked super-communities. For the detected communities, we compute internal and external influence, and for individual users, the retweet h-index influence. We apply the proposed approach to three years of Twitter data of all Slovenian tweets. The analysis shows that the Slovenian tweetosphere is dominated by politics, that the left-leaning communities are larger, but that the right-leaning communities and users exhibit significantly higher impact. An interesting observation is that retweet networks change relatively gradually, despite such events as the emergence of the Covid-19 pandemic or the change of government.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Online Social Networking , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Social Media , Humans
6.
J Nerv Ment Dis ; 209(9): 681-683, 2021 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1376357

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The COVID-19 pandemic brought with itself significant mental health challenges owing not only to the morbidity and mortality from the infection but also to mitigation strategies of social distancing and self-isolation. Indeed, in the absence of adequate pharmaceutical aids, quarantine and social distancing measures are taken to limit the spread of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Thus, living in the world of social media, the average usage of social media could be expected to show a sharp rise as measures of social distancing and quarantine are adopted to contain the pandemic. In this context, social media could be thought of as an additional preventative resource aiding the containment of the pandemic by being a key network for communication during a crisis.Because social media usage cannot be brought down to null considering the fact that it does have some positive aspects to it in terms of disposition of useful information, we could alternatively modify the reporting to be more responsible.In conclusion, we could hypothesize that social media might surge responses for some adverse mental health conditions, increasing fear, anxiety, and panic responses, even spreading suicidal ideation and therefore impacting incidence of suicide in some way. Moreover, social media should be carefully handled, particularly during the pandemic, as social media engagement spiked. Indeed, suicide news, when not reported adequately, and most dangerous social media challenges could have devastating effects among youngest users.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Suicidal Ideation , Suicide/prevention & control , Humans , Mental Health/statistics & numerical data , Online Social Networking , Psychiatry/methods
7.
Psychol Med ; 51(10): 1763-1769, 2021 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1337070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Social media platforms have long been recognised as major disseminators of health misinformation. Many previous studies have found a negative association between health-protective behaviours and belief in the specific form of misinformation popularly known as 'conspiracy theory'. Concerns have arisen regarding the spread of COVID-19 conspiracy theories on social media. METHODS: Three questionnaire surveys of social media use, conspiracy beliefs and health-protective behaviours with regard to COVID-19 among UK residents were carried out online, one using a self-selecting sample (N = 949) and two using stratified random samples from a recruited panel (N = 2250, N = 2254). RESULTS: All three studies found a negative relationship between COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs and COVID-19 health-protective behaviours, and a positive relationship between COVID-19 conspiracy beliefs and use of social media as a source of information about COVID-19. Studies 2 and 3 also found a negative relationship between COVID-19 health-protective behaviours and use of social media as a source of information, and Study 3 found a positive relationship between health-protective behaviours and use of broadcast media as a source of information. CONCLUSIONS: When used as an information source, unregulated social media may present a health risk that is partly but not wholly reducible to their role as disseminators of health-related conspiracy beliefs.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Consumer Health Information , Health Behavior , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Information Seeking Behavior , Online Social Networking , Social Media , Adult , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Male , Public Health , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
8.
J Am Geriatr Soc ; 69(10): 2716-2721, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1325028

ABSTRACT

During the COVID-19 pandemic, frontline nursing home staff faced extraordinary stressors including high infection and mortality rates and ever-changing and sometimes conflicting federal and state regulations. To support nursing homes in evidence-based infection control practices, the Massachusetts Senior Care Association and Hebrew SeniorLife partnered with the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality AHRQ ECHO National Nursing Home COVID-19 Action Network (the network). This educational program provided 16 weeks of free weekly virtual sessions to 295 eligible nursing homes, grouped into nine cohorts of 30-33 nursing homes. Eighty-three percent of eligible nursing homes in Massachusetts participated in the Network, and Hebrew SeniorLife's Training Center served the vast majority. Each cohort was led by geriatrics clinicians and nursing home leaders, and coaches trained in quality improvement. The interactive sessions provided timely updates on COVID-19 infection control best practices to improve care and also created a peer-to-peer learning community to share ongoing challenges and potential solutions. The weekly Network meetings were a source of connection, emotional support, and validation and may be a valuable mechanism to support resilience and well-being for nursing home staff.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Health Personnel , Nursing Homes , Online Social Networking , Resilience, Psychological , Skilled Nursing Facilities , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Education, Distance/methods , Evidence-Based Practice/education , Health Personnel/education , Health Personnel/psychology , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Massachusetts/epidemiology , Nursing Homes/standards , Nursing Homes/trends , Quality Improvement/organization & administration , SARS-CoV-2 , Skilled Nursing Facilities/standards , Skilled Nursing Facilities/trends , Social Support
9.
Sex Transm Infect ; 97(5): 357-362, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1318194

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Australia recorded its first case of COVID-19 in late January 2020. On 22P March 2020, amid increasing daily case numbers, the Australian Government implemented lockdown restrictions to help 'flatten the curve'. Our study aimed to understand the impact of lockdown restrictions on sexual and reproductive health. Here we focus on sexual practices. METHODS: An online survey was open from the 23PP April 2020 to 11P May 2020. Participants were recruited online via social media and other networks and were asked to report on their sexual practices in 2019 and during lockdown. Logistic regression was used to calculate the difference (diff) (including 95% CIs) in the proportion of sex practices between time periods. RESULTS: Of the 1187 who commenced the survey, 965 (81.3%) completed it. Overall, 70% were female and 66.3% were aged 18-29 years. Most (53.5%) reported less sex during lockdown than in 2019. Compared with 2019, participants were more likely to report sex with a spouse (35.3% vs 41.7%; diff=6.4%; 95% CI 3.6 to 9.2) and less likely to report sex with a girl/boyfriend (45.1% vs 41.8%; diff=-3.3%; 95% CI -7.0 to -0.4) or with casual hook-up (31.4% vs 7.8%; 95% CI -26.9 to -19.8). Solo sex activities increased; 14.6% (123/840) reported using sex toys more often and 26.0% (218/838) reported masturbating more often. Dating app use decreased during lockdown compared with 2019 (42.1% vs 27.3%; diff= -14.8%; 95% CI -17.6 to -11.9). Using dating apps for chatting/texting (89.8% vs 94.5%; diff=4.7%; 95% CI 1.0 to 8.5) and for setting up virtual dates (2.6% vs 17.2%; diff=14.6%; 95% CI 10.1 to 19.2) increased during lockdown. CONCLUSION: Although significant declines in sexual activity during lockdown were reported, people did not completely stop engaging in sexual activities, highlighting the importance of ensuring availability of normal sexual and reproductive health services during global emergencies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Sexual Behavior/statistics & numerical data , Adult , Australia , COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/prevention & control , Female , Humans , Male , Online Social Networking , Online Systems , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
10.
JAMA Neurol ; 78(6): 645-646, 2021 06 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1269082
11.
Medwave ; 21(4): e8186, 2021 May 24.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1259722

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: On March 19, 2020, preventive and mandatory social isolation was decreed in Argentina in response to the pandemic caused by the SARS-CoV-2 virus and the disease it causes (COVID-19). This measure aimed to reduce the transmission of the virus and the resulting severe respira-tory condition that frequently besets older adults. However, this measure can also affect the support networks of these isolated people. OBJECTIVES: To explore the emerging needs related to the mental health of isolated older adults in this period and to identify the main support networks they have and the emerging coping strategies in the face of the situation. METHODOLOGY: We carried out an exploratory qualitative study, summoning participants over 60 years of age. Using snowball sampling, a group of researchers contacted them by phone to collect data. The analysis of the findings was triangulated among researchers with different academic backgrounds (medicine, psychology, and sociology). The concepts emerging from the interviews were linked in conceptual networks using an inductive methodology and were mapped into conceptual frameworks available to researchers. Atlas.ti 8 software was used for coding. RESULTS: Thirty-nine participants belonging to the Buenos Aires Metropolitan Area were interviewed between April and July 2020. For greater clarity, the main themes were described in five cross-sectional axes: network configurations, resources and coping strategies, affective states and emo-tions, perceptions and reflections on the future, and actions emerging from the participatory approach. Participants reported distress, anxiety, anger, uncertainty, exhaustion, and expressed fear of contagion from themselves and their loved ones. We identify greater vulnerability in people living alone, in small and closed environments, with weak linkages and networks, or limited access to technologies. We also found vari-ous coping strategies and technology was a fundamental factor in maintaining the bonds. CONCLUSIONS: The findings of this research have implications for decision-making at the individual level, health systems, professional care, and policy devel-opment. Future research may elucidate the regional, temporal, and socioeconomic variations of the phenomena explored in our research.


INTRODUCCIÓN: El 19 marzo de 2020 se decretó el aislamiento social preventivo y obligatorio en Argentina como respuesta a la pandemia por el virus SARS-CoV-2 y la enfermedad que causa (COVID-19). Esta medida tiene por objetivo disminuir la transmisión del virus que puede generar un cuadro respiratorio severo, más frecuentemente en adultos mayores. Sin embargo, esta medida puede afectar sus redes de contención por encontrarse previamente aislados. OBJETIVOS: Explorar las necesidades emergentes relacionadas a la salud mental de adultos mayores aislados en este periodo, e identificar las principales redes de contención con que estos cuentan, como así también las estrategias de afrontamiento emergentes frente a la situación. METODOLOGÍA: Se realizó un estudio cualitativo exploratorio convocando a participantes mayores de 60 años de edad. Mediante un muestreo en bola de nieve, un grupo de investigadores los contactó por teléfono para la recolección de datos. Se trianguló el análisis de los hallazgos entre los investigado-res con distinta formación académica (medicina, psicología y sociología). Los conceptos emergentes de las entrevistas fueron vinculados en redes conceptuales utilizando una metodología inductiva, y mapeando en marcos conceptuales disponibles para los investigadores. Para la codi-ficación se usó el software Atlas.ti 8. RESULTADOS: Se entrevistaron a 39 participantes pertenecientes al área metropolitana de Buenos Aires durante los meses de abril y julio de 2020. Para una presentación más clara, los principales temas fueron descritos en cinco ejes transversales: configuraciones vinculares; recursos y estrategias de afrontamiento; estados afectivos y emociones; percepciones y reflexiones sobre el futuro; y acciones emergentes del enfoque participativo. Los participantes del estudio relataron angustia, ansiedad, enojo, incertidumbre, hartazgo y expresaron el temor al contagio de sí mismos y de sus seres queridos. Se identificaron personas en situación de mayor vulnerabilidad al vivir solas, en ambientes pequeños y cerrados, con redes vinculares frágiles o con limitado manejo de las tecnologías. También encontramos estrategias de afrontamiento variadas para atravesar la situación y la tecnología fue un actor fundamental en el mantenimiento de los vínculos. CONCLUSIONES: Los hallazgos de esta investigación tienen implicancias en la toma de decisiones a nivel individual, de los sistemas de salud, atención profesional y el desarrollo de políticas. Futuras investigaciones pueden dilucidar las variaciones regionales, temporales y socioeconómicas de los fenómenos explorados en nuestra investigación.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Needs Assessment , Physical Distancing , Social Isolation/psychology , Activities of Daily Living , Adaptation, Psychological , Aged , Argentina/epidemiology , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Emotions , Family Relations , Fear , Female , Government Regulation , Humans , Interpersonal Relations , Male , Mental Health , Middle Aged , Online Social Networking , Peer Group , Qualitative Research , Quarantine/psychology , Social Networking , Social Participation , Social Support
14.
Eur J Cardiovasc Nurs ; 20(4): 392-396, 2021 05 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1203685

ABSTRACT

Face-to-face interviews have long been the norm for conducting qualitative interviews in healthcare research. However, the Covid-19 pandemic has accelerated the need to explore alternative methods. This, along with the swift digitalization of healthcare, has led to video, telephone, and online interactions becoming increasingly used. The use of new techniques to carry out interviews through video, telephone, and online applications all come with benefits and drawbacks. In this article, three ways of collecting data through qualitative interviews are described and their uses exemplified through a project investigating the impact of a transition program for adolescents with congenital heart disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Data Collection/methods , Electronic Mail , Heart Defects, Congenital/diagnosis , Heart Defects, Congenital/nursing , Online Social Networking , Telephone , Video Recording , Adolescent , Cardiovascular Nursing/methods , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Psicol. soc. (Online) ; 32: e020005, 2020.
Article in Portuguese | WHO COVID, LILACS (Americas) | ID: covidwho-755174

ABSTRACT

Resumo O presente artigo visa explorar diferentes metáforas acionadas na primeira fase da pandemia do novo coronavírus no Brasil, inspirado na obra de Susan Sontag, A doença como metáfora. As metáforas são ferramentas centrais nos processos de subjetivação da pandemia, do vírus que a causa e da doença que ela materializa. O material empírico que sustenta nossas reflexões vem de encontros semanais de um grupo terapêutico que passamos a conduzir on-line com as medidas de isolamento social no país, e de observação participante nas redes sociais da internet. Com base nisso, pensamos em quatro chaves de metáforas: o (in)visível, o mascarado, o divino e o isolado. A partir dessas categorias, é possível refletir sobre questões como sofrimento ético-político, resistência subjetiva, luto, negação, melancolia e megalomania, presentes nos modos de subjetivação da pandemia.


Resumen Este artículo tiene como objetivo explorar diferentes metáforas desencadenadas en la primera fase de la nueva pandemia de Coronavirus en Brasil, inspirado en el trabajo de Susan Sontag, "La enfermedad como metáfora". Las metáforas son herramientas centrales en los procesos de subjetivación de la pandemia, el virus que la causa y la enfermedad que le materializa. El material empírico que sustenta nuestras reflexiones proviene de reuniones semanales de un grupo terapéutico que comenzamos a realizar en línea con las medidas de aislamiento social en el país, y de la observación participante en las redes sociales de internet. Basado en esto, pensamos en cuatro claves metáforas: lo (no) visible, lo enmascarado, lo divino y lo aislado. A partir de estas categorías, es posible reflexionar sobre cuestiones como el sufrimiento ético-político, la resistencia subjetiva, el luto, la negación, la melancolía y la megalomanía, presentes en los modos de subjetivación de la pandemia.


Abstract This article aims to explore different metaphors triggered in the first phase of the pandemic of the new coronavirus in Brazil, inspired by Susan Sontag's work, "Illness as metaphor". Metaphors are central tools in the processes of subjectification of the pandemic, the virus that causes it and the disease that it materializes. The empirical material that supports our reflections comes from weekly meetings of a therapeutic group that we started to conduct online due to the measures of social isolation in the country, and from participant observation in the internet social media. Based on this, we propose four metaphor keys: the (in)visible, the masked, the divine and the isolated. From these categories, it is possible to reflect on issues present in the pandemic's subjectivation modes such as ethical-political suffering, subjective resistance, mourning, denial, melancholy, and megalomania.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus , Metaphor , Pandemics , Brazil , Online Social Networking
18.
Rev Gaucha Enferm ; 42(spe): e20200158, 2021.
Article in English, Portuguese | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1076311

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To report a virtual Cultural Circle experience implemented with nurses to allow them to dialogue and promote health amidst the pandemic of the Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19). METHOD: Experience report of a virtual Cultural Circle based on Paulo Freire's framework. The stages were correlated to the oil lamp, the symbol of the nursing profession: the lamp body was considered the Thematic Investigation, the lamp support corresponded to Encoding and Decoding, and the light corresponded to Critical Unveiling. Fourteen nurses working in different health settings located in different Brazilian regions participated. RESULTS: Two themes emerged: adjusting my inner light and taking care of my family and work. FINAL CONSIDERATIONS: The nurses exchanged experiences and strengthened themselves to overcome the challenges imposed by the fight against the COVID-19, acquiring autonomy to take care of themselves and provide care to others.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Health Promotion/methods , Interprofessional Relations , Nursing Staff, Hospital/psychology , Online Social Networking , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Brazil , Female , Humans , Middle Aged
19.
J Nutr Health Aging ; 25(4): 516-519, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1061555

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine whether older users of information and communicative technology (ICT) participate in active behaviors, such as voluntary exercise, to maintain health, even under community containment to suppress the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. DESIGN: Cross-sectional study. SETTING: Community setting. PARTICIPANTS: Independent community-dwelling older residents aged ≥75 years. MEASUREMENTS: The municipality sent the Kihon Checklist (KCL) and Simplified Nutritional Appetite Questionnaire (SNAQ) with several questions on lifestyle and health conditions under social restriction. RESULTS: Among 3199 responders (72.1%), we analyzed the data of 2304 residents who provided complete answers to the KCL and SNAQ and on ICT use, voluntary exercise, polypharmacy, and families. The mean age was 79.7 years (51.3% male). The percentages of frailty assessed by the KCL, voluntary exercise, and low SNAQ scores (≤14) were 16.0%, 61.4%, and 43.8% in 808 ICT users and 30.3%, 47.2%, and 54.1% in 1496 ICT non-users, respectively (p<0.001). ICT use was significantly associated with voluntary exercise even during social restriction, independent of age, sex, polypharmacy, low SNAQ scores, and frailty status (odds ratio, 1.503; 95% confidential interval, 1.246-1.813). CONCLUSION: Older ICT users are more active to maintain health even during social restriction, independent of frailty status.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/psychology , Exercise , Frailty/physiopathology , Online Social Networking , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Independent Living , Internet , Male , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , Technology
20.
BMJ Open ; 10(12): e041995, 2020 12 22.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-999259

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Jordan, a Middle Eastern country, declared a state of national emergency due to COVID-19 and a strict nationwide lockdown on 17 March 2020, banning all travel and movement around the country, potentially impacting mental health. This study sought to investigate the association between mental health (eg, anxiety and depressive symptoms) and sleep health among a sample of Jordanians living through a state of COVID-19-induced nationwide lockdown. METHODS: Using Facebook, participants (n=1240) in Jordan in March 2020 were recruited and direct to a web-based survey measuring anxiety (items from General Anxiety Disorder 7-item (GAD-7) scale instrument), depressive symptoms (items from Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale), sleep health (items from the Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and sociodemographic. A modified Poisson regression model with robust error variance. Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPRs) and 95% CIs were estimated to examine how anxiety and depressive symptoms may affect different dimensions of sleep health: (1) poor sleep quality, (2) short sleep duration, (3) encountering sleep problems. RESULTS: The majority of participants reported having experienced mild (33.8%), moderate (12.9%) or severe (6.3%) levels of anxiety during lockdown, and nearly half of respondents reported depressive symptoms during lockdown. Similarly, over 60% of participants reported having experienced at least one sleep problem in the last week, and nearly half reported having had short sleep duration. Importantly, anxiety was associated with poor sleep health outcomes. For example, corresponding to the dose-response relationship between anxiety and sleep health outcomes, those reporting severe anxiety were the most likely to experience poor sleep quality (aPR =8.95; 95% CI=6.12 to 13.08), short sleep duration (aPR =2.23; 95% CI=1.91 to 2.61) and at least one problem sleep problem (aPR=1.73; 95% CI=1.54 to 1.95). Moreover, depressive symptoms were also associated with poor sleep health outcomes. As compared with scoring in the first quartile, scoring fourth quartile was associated with poor sleep quality (aPR=11.82; 95% CI=6.64 to 21.04), short sleep duration (aPR=1.87; 95% CI=1.58 to 2.22), and experiencing at least one sleep problem (aPR=1.90; 95% CI=1.66 to 2.18). CONCLUSIONS: Increased levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms can negatively influence sleep health among a sample of Jordanian adults living in a state of COVID-19-induced nationwide lockdown.


Subject(s)
Anxiety , COVID-19 , Depression , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders , Social Isolation/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/complications , Anxiety/diagnosis , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/psychology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Depression/complications , Depression/diagnosis , Female , Humans , Jordan/epidemiology , Male , Mental Health/trends , Online Social Networking , Prevalence , Psychological Techniques , SARS-CoV-2 , Sleep Hygiene , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/diagnosis , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/etiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
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