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1.
Am J Surg ; 223(1): 176-181, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1568479

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: Perioperative inefficiency can increase cost. We describe a process improvement initiative that addressed preoperative delays on an academic vascular surgery service. METHODS: First case vascular surgeries from July 2019-January 2020 were retrospectively reviewed for delays, defined as late arrival to the operating room (OR). A stakeholder group spearheaded by a surgeon-informaticist analyzed this process and implemented a novel electronic medical records (EMR) preoperative tool with improved preoperative workflow and role delegation; results were reviewed for 3 months after implementation. RESULTS: 57% of cases had first case on-time starts with average delay of 19 min. Inappropriate preoperative orders were identified as a dominant delay source (average delay = 38 min). Three months post-implementation, 53% of first cases had on-time starts with average delay of 11 min (P < 0.05). No delays were due to missing orders. CONCLUSIONS: Inconsistent preoperative workflows led to inappropriate orders and delays, increasing cost and decreasing quality. A novel EMR tool subsequently reduced delays with projected savings of $1,200/case. Workflow standardization utilizing informatics can increase efficiency, raising the value of surgical care.


Subject(s)
Cost Savings/statistics & numerical data , Efficiency, Organizational/economics , Medical Informatics , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Vascular Surgical Procedures/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/economics , Academic Medical Centers/organization & administration , Academic Medical Centers/statistics & numerical data , Efficiency, Organizational/standards , Efficiency, Organizational/statistics & numerical data , Health Plan Implementation/organization & administration , Health Plan Implementation/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Operating Rooms/economics , Operating Rooms/standards , Operating Rooms/statistics & numerical data , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Program Evaluation , Quality Improvement , Retrospective Studies , Root Cause Analysis/statistics & numerical data , Vascular Surgical Procedures/economics , Vascular Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Workflow
4.
Eur J Pediatr Surg ; 31(4): 305-310, 2021 Aug.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275991

ABSTRACT

This is a narrative review during the ongoing coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic to streamline workflow of pediatric surgical patients in operating theaters and for theater teams involved in their management. Pediatric patient anxiety in theaters, aspects of communication, and optimizing vision during surgery during the pandemic have also been addressed. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the creation of pathways in the surgical management of patients. As the pandemic progressed, hospitals developed pathways to offer increased protection to staff during procedures. This narrative review provides a clear perspective in the management of pediatric patients in operating theaters. Guidelines received from National Health Authorities and Societies affiliated with surgery, endoscopic surgery, anesthesiology, and endoscopy were carefully reviewed regarding their recommendations and data emerging from reports on COVID-19 were selected to compile the pathways specific for pediatric patients and staff. The workflow pathways have been successfully implemented during the pandemic and include a section on patients for endoscopy as well as approach to endoscopic surgery and open procedures. Theater room ergonomics that were successful during the pandemic have been outlined along with identification of areas specific to the pediatric patient anxiety, interteam communication/identification, and visor-related vision. The guidelines used successfully during the pandemic for pediatric theater teams can be used or adapted for formulating local hospital guidelines in other centers that could be valuable in patient management beyond the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pediatrics/organization & administration , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Specialties, Surgical/organization & administration , Anesthesiology , Child , Endoscopy , Ergonomics , Humans , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Workflow
5.
World Neurosurg ; 153: e187-e194, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1275762

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To assess organizational and technical difficulties of neurosurgical procedures during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and their possible impact on survival and functional outcome and to evaluate virological exposure risk of medical personnel. METHODS: Data for all urgent surgical procedures performed in the COVID-19 operating room were prospectively collected. Preoperative and postoperative variables included demographics, pathology, Karnofsky performance status (KPS) and neurological status at admission, type and duration of surgical procedures, length of stay, postoperative KPS and functional outcome comparison, and destination at discharge. We defined 5 classes of pathologies (traumatic, oncological, vascular, infection, hydrocephalus) and 4 surgical categories (burr hole, craniotomy, cerebrospinal fluid shunting, spine surgery). Postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection was checked in all the operators. RESULTS: We identified 11 traumatic cases (44%), 4 infections (16%), 6 vascular events (24%), 2 hydrocephalus conditions (8%), and 2 oncological cases (8%). Surgical procedures included 11 burr holes (44%), 7 craniotomies (28%), 6 cerebrospinal fluid shunts (24%), and 1 spine surgery (4%). Mean patient age was 57.8 years. The most frequent clinical presentation was coma (44 cases). Mean KPS score at admission was 20 ± 10, mean surgery duration was 85 ± 63 minutes, and mean length of stay was 27 ± 12 days. Mean KPS score at discharge was 35 ± 25. Outcome comparison showed improvement in 16 patients. Four patients died. Mean follow-up was 6 ± 3 months. None of the operators developed postoperative SARS-CoV-2 infection. CONCLUSIONS: Standardized protocols are mandatory to guarantee a high standard of care for emergency and urgent surgeries during the COVID-19 pandemic. Personal protective equipment affects maneuverability, dexterity, and duration of interventions without affecting survival and functional outcome.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/transmission , Infection Control , Neurosurgical Procedures/mortality , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19 Testing , Emergencies , Female , Humans , Infant , Infection Control/instrumentation , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Infectious Disease Transmission, Professional-to-Patient/prevention & control , Italy/epidemiology , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Pandemics , Perioperative Care , Personal Protective Equipment/adverse effects , Personal Protective Equipment/virology , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
6.
J Plast Reconstr Aesthet Surg ; 74(11): 3073-3079, 2021 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1270578

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Ramifications of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on the re-structuring of healthcare are widespread, including delivery of surgical services across all specialties, including plastic surgery. Re-deployment of personnel and cessation of elective services are commonplace. However, there is a continued need for both emergency and oncological surgery. A national review of practice was conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic, to assess impact on services, staffing and training. METHODS: Key aspects of current plastic surgery practice in the United Kingdom were examined in this cross-sectional study; operating capacity, location of theatre lists (national health service or outsourced private institutions (PIs)), differences across sub-specialties, change in anaesthesia practices, staffing, re-deployment, on-call provision and impact on training. RESULTS: Three-hundred and forty-four plastic surgeons in the United Kingdom provided practice data across 51 units. Theatre capacity and outpatient services were markedly reduced. Outsourcing of operating lists to PIs was widely utilised. Increased use of local anaesthetic hand procedures, the prioritisation of shorter operations with reduced microsurgery in both head and neck/lower limb and almost complete cessation of breast reconstruction were noted, together with marked regional variations. Re-deployment occurred at all staffing levels, whilst telemedicine played a critical role in both patient management and training. CONCLUSIONS: COVID-19 has enforced unprecedented changes to surgical care delivery and training, as identified by examination of plastic surgery nationally in the United Kingdom. Novel means to support continued elective and emergency services, including oncology have been identified. Lessons learned will allow phased return of services and improved preparation for the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Reconstructive Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling/organization & administration , Surgery, Plastic , Surveys and Questionnaires , United Kingdom
7.
Anesthesiol Clin ; 39(2): 363-377, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1240167

ABSTRACT

In March 2020, the COVID-19 pandemic reached New York City, resulting in thousands of deaths over the following months. Because of the exponential spread of disease, the New York City hospital systems became rapidly overwhelmed. The Department of Anesthesiology at New York Presbyterian (NYP)-Columbia continued to offer anesthesia services for obstetrics and emergency surgery, while redirecting the rest of its staff to the expanded airway management role and the creation of the largest novel intensive care unit in the NYP system. Tremendous innovation and optimization were necessary in the face of material, physical, and staffing constraints.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia/statistics & numerical data , Anesthesiology/organization & administration , COVID-19 , Health Resources/organization & administration , Hospitals , Pandemics , Hospital Departments/organization & administration , Humans , New York City , Operating Rooms/organization & administration
9.
JAMA Netw Open ; 4(4): e216857, 2021 04 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1192058

ABSTRACT

Importance: The COVID-19 pandemic has brought forth new challenges for health care workers, such as the daily use of personal protective equipment, including reusable facial respirators. Poor communication while wearing respirators may have fatal complications for patients, and no solution has been proposed to date. Objective: To examine whether use of an in-ear communication device is associated with improved communication while wearing different personal protective equipment (N95 mask, half-face elastomeric respirator, and powered air-purifying respirator [PAPR]) in the operating room. Design, Setting, and Participants: This quality improvement study was conducted in June 2020. Surgical residents from the Department of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery at McGill University in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, were recruited. All participants had normal hearing, were fluent in English, and had access to the operating rooms at the Royal Victoria Hospital. Exposures: All participants performed the speech intelligibility tasks with and without an in-ear communication device. Main Outcomes and Measures: Speech intelligibility was measured using a word recognition task (Modified Rhyme Test) and a sentence recognition task (AzBio Sentence Test). A percentage correct score (0% to 100%) was obtained for each speech intelligibility test. Listening effort was assessed using the NASA Task Load Index. An overall workload score, ranging from 0 points (low workload) to 100 points (high workload), was obtained. Results: A total of 12 participants were included (mean [SD] age, 31.2 [1.9] years; 8 women [66.7%]). AzBio Sentence Test results revealed that, while wearing the N95 mask, the mean (SD) speech intelligibility was 98.8% (1.8%) without the in-ear device vs 94.3% (7.4%) with the device. While wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator, the mean speech intelligibility was 58.5% (12.4%) without the in-ear device vs 90.8% (8.9%) with the device. While wearing the PAPR, the mean speech intelligibility was 84.6% (9.8%) without the in-ear device vs 94.5% (5.5%) with the device. Use of the in-ear device was associated with a significant improvement in speech intelligibility while wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator (32.3%; 95% CI, 23.8%-40.7%; P < .001) and the PAPR (9.9%; 95% CI, 1.4%-18.3%; P = .01). Furthermore, use of the device was associated with decreased listening effort. The NASA Task Load Index results reveal that, while wearing the N95 mask, the mean (SD) overall workload score was 12.6 (10.6) points without the in-ear device vs 17.6 (9.2) points with the device. While wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator, the mean overall workload score was 67.7 (21.6) points without the in-ear device vs 29.3 (14.4) points with the in-ear device. While wearing the PAPR, the mean overall workload score was 42.2 (18.2) points without the in-ear device vs 23.8 (12.8) points with the in-ear device. Use of the in-ear device was associated with a significant decrease in overall workload score while wearing the half-face elastomeric respirator (38.4; 95% CI, 23.5-53.3; P < .001) and the PAPR (18.4; 95% CI, 0.4-36.4; P = .04). Conclusions and Relevance: This study found that among participants using facial respirators that impaired communication, a novel in-ear device was associated with improved communication and decreased listening effort. Such a device may be a feasible solution for protecting health care workers in the operating room while allowing them to communicate safely, especially during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communication , Hearing Aids/standards , Hearing , N95 Respirators/adverse effects , N95 Respirators/standards , Operating Rooms , Respiratory Protective Devices/adverse effects , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/prevention & control , Canada , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Infection Control/instrumentation , Male , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Operating Rooms/standards , Quality Improvement , SARS-CoV-2 , Simulation Training , Speech Discrimination Tests/methods
10.
Anesth Analg ; 132(5): 1182-1190, 2021 05 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1190134

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) emerged as a public health crisis that disrupted normal patterns of health care in the New York City metropolitan area. In preparation for a large influx of critically ill patients, operating rooms (ORs) at NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia University Irving Medical Center (NYP-Columbia) were converted into a novel intensive care unit (ICU) area, the operating room intensive care unit (ORICU). METHODS: Twenty-three ORs were converted into an 82-bed ORICU. Adaptations to the OR environment permitted the delivery of standard critical care therapies. Nonintensive-care-trained staff were educated on the basics of critical care and deployed in a hybrid staffing model. Anesthesia machines were repurposed as critical care ventilators, with accommodations to ensure reliable function and patient safety. To compare ORICU survivorship to outcomes in more traditional environments, we performed Kaplan-Meier survival analysis of all patients cared for in the ORICU, censoring data at the time of ORICU closure. We hypothesized that age, sex, and obesity may have influenced the risk of death. Thus, we estimated hazard ratios (HR) for death using Cox proportional hazard regression models with age, sex, and body mass index (BMI) as covariables and, separately, using older age (65 years and older) adjusted for sex and BMI. RESULTS: The ORICU cared for 133 patients from March 24 to May 14, 2020. Patients were transferred to the ORICU from other ICUs, inpatient wards, the emergency department, and other institutions. Patients remained in the ORICU until either transfer to another unit or death. As the hospital patient load decreased, patients were transferred out of the ORICU. This process was completed on May 14, 2020. At time of data censoring, 55 (41.4%) of patients had died. The estimated probability of survival 30 days after admission was 0.61 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.52-0.69). Age was significantly associated with increased risk of mortality (HR = 1.05, 95% CI, 1.03-1.08, P < .001 for a 1-year increase in age). Patients who were ≥65 years were an estimated 3.17 times more likely to die than younger patients (95% CI, 1.78-5.63; P < .001) when adjusting for sex and BMI. CONCLUSIONS: A large number of critically ill COVID-19 patients were cared for in the ORICU, which substantially increased ICU capacity at NYP-Columbia. The estimated ORICU survival rate at 30 days was comparable to other reported rates, suggesting this was an effective approach to manage the influx of critically ill COVID-19 patients during a time of crisis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/mortality , COVID-19/therapy , Hospital Mortality , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Aged , COVID-19/diagnosis , Critical Illness/therapy , Female , Hospital Mortality/trends , Hospitals, Urban/trends , Humans , Intensive Care Units/trends , Male , Middle Aged , New York City/epidemiology , Operating Rooms/trends , Organization and Administration , Survival Rate/trends , Treatment Outcome
11.
PLoS One ; 16(4): e0249586, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1170005

ABSTRACT

Medical procedures that produce aerosolized particles are under great scrutiny due to the recent concerns surrounding the COVID-19 virus and increased risk for nosocomial infections. For example, thoracostomies, tracheotomies and intubations/extubations produce aerosols that can linger in the air. The lingering time is dependent on particle size where, e.g., 500 µm (0.5 mm) particles may quickly fall to the floor, while 1 µm particles may float for extended lengths of time. Here, a method is presented to characterize the size of <40 µm to >600 µm particles resulting from surgery in an operating room (OR). The particles are measured in-situ (next to a patient on an operating table) through a 75mm aperture in a ∼400 mm rectangular enclosure with minimal flow restriction. The particles and gasses exiting a patient are vented through an enclosed laser sheet while a camera captures images of the side-scattered light from the entrained particles. A similar optical configuration was described by Anfinrud et al.; however, we present here an extended method which provides a calibration method for determining particle size. The use of a laser sheet with side-scattered light provides a large FOV and bright image of the particles; however, the particle image dilation caused by scattering does not allow direct measurement of particle size. The calibration routine presented here is accomplished by measuring fixed particle distribution ranges with a calibrated shadow imaging system and mapping these measurements to the in-situ imaging system. The technique used for generating and measuring these particles is described. The result is a three-part process where 1) particles of varying sizes are produced and measured using a calibrated, high-resolution shadow imaging method, 2) the same particle generators are measured with the in-situ imaging system, and 3) a correlation mapping is made between the (dilated) laser image size and the measured particle size. Additionally, experimental and operational details of the imaging system are described such as requirements for the enclosure volume, light management, air filtration and control of various laser reflections. Details related to the OR environment and requirements for achieving close proximity to a patient are discussed as well.


Subject(s)
Aerosols/chemistry , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Particle Size , COVID-19/prevention & control , COVID-19/virology , Humans
13.
Emerg Med J ; 38(4): 308-314, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1081663

ABSTRACT

Emilia-Romagna was one of the most affected Italian regions during the COVID-19 outbreak in February 2020. We describe here the profound regional, provincial and municipal changes in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, to cope with the numbers of patients presenting with COVID-19 illness, as well as coping with the ongoing need to care for patients presenting with non-COVID-19 emergencies. We focus on the structural and functional changes in one particular hospital within the city of Bologna, the regional capital, which acted as the central emergency hub for time-sensitive pathologies for the province of Bologna. Finally, we present the admissions profile to our emergency department in relation to the massive increase of infected patients observed in our region as well as the organisational response to prepare for the second wave of the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Disease Outbreaks , Emergency Medical Services/organization & administration , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Air Ambulances , COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Hospital Restructuring , Hospitals, Urban/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Personal Protective Equipment
14.
J Perioper Pract ; 31(4): 159-162, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1067157

ABSTRACT

On 20 August 2020, Public Health England released a new version of the 'COVID-19: Guidance for the remobilisation of services within health and care settings: infection prevention and control recommendations', superseding that of 18 June 2020. In this document, the infection prevention and control principles determine that the treatment, care and support of patients are to be managed in three COVID-19 pathways. These are: 'high risk', 'medium risk' and 'low risk'. In the operating theatre, where procedures may be urgent or planned, and where various surgical and anaesthetic procedures generate airborne particles (aerosols), it is crucial to communicate the infection prevention and control recommendations in a way that is easily understood and followed by all healthcare professionals. The theatre team at one hospital in the East of England produced local alternating signage to communicate the COVID-19 pathway risk during cases in theatres. This signage - named the 'COVID-19 Flag' - is placed outside of the individual theatre to ensure that staff are informed of the infection risk with the cases underway. Furthermore, it is a quick visual guide to be used in conjunction with national guidance and local protocols for appropriate decisions regarding the treatment and care of patients in the operating theatres.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/nursing , Communication , Critical Pathways/organization & administration , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Surgical Wound Infection/nursing , England , Humans , Patient Care Team/organization & administration , Risk Factors , Surgical Wound Infection/prevention & control
15.
Ann Acad Med Singap ; 49(12): 1009-1012, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1037619

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has spread globally, infecting and killing millions of people worldwide. The use of operating rooms (ORs) and the post-anaesthesia care unit (PACU) for intensive care is part of surge response planning. We aim to describe and discuss some of the practical considerations involved in a large tertiary hospital in Singapore. Firstly, considerations for setting up a level III intensive care unit (ICU) include that of space, staff, supplies and standards. Secondly, oxygen supply of the entire hospital is a major determinant of the number of ventilators it can support, including those on non-invasive forms of oxygen therapy. Thirdly, air flows due to positive pressure systems within the OR complex need to be addressed. In addition, due to the worldwide shortage of ICU ventilators, the US Food and Drug Administration has granted temporary approval for the use of anaesthesia gas machines for patients requiring mechanical ventilation. Lastly, planning of logistics and staff deployment needs to be carefully considered during a crisis. Although OR and PACU are not designed for long-term care of critically ill patients, they may be adapted for ICU use with careful planning in the current pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/therapy , Critical Care/organization & administration , Health Resources/organization & administration , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Tertiary Care Centers/organization & administration , COVID-19/epidemiology , Critical Care/methods , Critical Illness , Health Care Rationing/organization & administration , Health Services Accessibility/organization & administration , Humans , Pandemics , Respiration, Artificial , Singapore/epidemiology
16.
Semin Perinatol ; 44(7): 151281, 2020 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1028154

ABSTRACT

Though much of routine healthcare pauses in a public health emergency, childbirth continues uninterrupted. Crises like COVID-19 put incredible strains on healthcare systems and require strategic planning, flexible adaptability, clear communication, and judicious resource allocation. Experiences from obstetric units affected by COVID-19 highlight the importance of developing new teams and workflows to ensure patient and healthcare worker safety. Additionally, adapting a strategy that combines units and staff from different areas and hospitals can allow for synergistic opportunities to provision care appropriately to manage a structure and workforce at maximum capacity.


Subject(s)
Infection Control/organization & administration , Maternal Health Services/organization & administration , Multi-Institutional Systems/organization & administration , Obstetrics and Gynecology Department, Hospital/organization & administration , Delivery Rooms/organization & administration , Delivery of Health Care , Female , Humans , Obstetrics , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Am Surg ; 86(12): 1623-1628, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1011070

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: COVID-19 put a stop to the operative experience of surgical residents, leaving reassignment of the team, to the frontlines. Each program has adapted uniquely; we discuss how our surgical education changed in our hospital. STUDY DESIGN: A retrospective review of changes in general surgery cases, bedside procedures, and utilization of residents before and during the pandemic. Procedures were retrieved from electronic medical records. Operating room (OR) cases 1 month before and 5 weeks after the executive order were collected. Triple lumen catheter (TLC), temporary hemodialysis catheter (HDC), and pneumothorax catheter (PC) insertions by surgical residents were recorded for 5 weeks. RESULTS: Before the pandemic, an average of 27.9 cases were done in the OR, with an average of 10.1 general surgery cases. From March 23 to April 30, 2020, the average number of cases decreased to 5.1, and general surgery cases decreased to 2.2. Elective, urgent, and emergent cases represented 83%, 14.6%, and 2.4% prior to the order and 66.7%, 15.1%, and 18.2%, respectively, after the order. Bedside procedures over 5 weeks totaled to 153, 93 TLCs, 39 HDCs, and 21 PCs. CONCLUSION: Repurposing the surgical department for the concerns of the pandemic has involved all surgical staff. We worked with other departments to allocate our team to areas of need and re-evaluated daily. The strengths of our team to deliver care and perform many bedside procedures allowed us to meet the demands posed by this disease while remaining as a cohesive unit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , General Surgery/education , Hospitals, Community/organization & administration , Internship and Residency , COVID-19/epidemiology , Emergency Service, Hospital/organization & administration , Hospital Bed Capacity, 100 to 299 , Hospital Units/organization & administration , Humans , Intensive Care Units/organization & administration , New York/epidemiology , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Pandemics , Personnel Staffing and Scheduling , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Surgical Procedures, Operative/statistics & numerical data
19.
J Am Acad Orthop Surg Glob Res Rev ; 4(12): e20.00100, 2020 12 15.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-983932

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: Wide-awake local anesthesia no tourniquet (WALANT) presents a nonstandard anesthetic approach initially described for use in hand surgery that has gained interest and utilization across a variety of orthopaedic procedures. In response to operating room resource constraints imposed by the COVID-19 pandemic, our orthopaedic service rapidly adopted and expanded its use of WALANT. METHODS: A retrospective review of 16 consecutive cases performed by 7 surgeons was conducted. Patient demographics, surgical details, and perioperative outcomes were assessed. The primary end point was WALANT failure, defined as intraoperative conversion to general anesthesia. RESULTS: No instances of WALANT failure requiring conversion to general anesthesia occurred. In recovery, one patient (6%) required narcotics for pain control, and the average postoperative pain numeric rating scale was 0.6. The maximum pain score experienced was 4 in the patient requiring postoperative narcotics. The average time in recovery was 42 minutes and ranged from 8 to 118 minutes. CONCLUSION: The WALANT technique was safely and effectively used in 16 cases across multiple orthopaedic subspecialties, including three procedures not previously described in the literature. WALANT techniques hold promise for use in future disaster scenarios and should be evaluated for potential incorporation into routine orthopaedic surgical care.


Subject(s)
Anesthesia, Local/methods , COVID-19 , Operating Rooms/organization & administration , Orthopedic Procedures , Adult , Aged , Anesthetics, Local/administration & dosage , COVID-19/epidemiology , Epinephrine/administration & dosage , Female , Hemostatics/administration & dosage , Humans , Lidocaine/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Narcotics/therapeutic use , Pain, Postoperative/drug therapy , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Vasoconstrictor Agents/administration & dosage , Young Adult
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