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1.
Cornea ; 41(3): 339-346, 2022 03 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1865000

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The purpose of this study was to assess the medical history of adenoviral keratoconjunctivitis (AK) and subepithelial infiltrates (SEIs) among French ophthalmologists and orthoptists and the frequency of unreported occupational diseases. We also described short-term and long-term consequences of AK and evaluated associated factors. METHODS: The REDCap questionnaire was diffused online several times over 7 consecutive months, from October 2019 to May 2020, through mailing lists (French Society of Ophthalmology, residents, and hospital departments), social networks, and by word of mouth. RESULTS: Seven hundred ten participants were included with a response rate of 6.2% for ophthalmologists, 3.8% for orthoptists, and 28.3% for ophthalmology residents. The medical history of AK was found in 24.1% (95% confidence interval 21%-27.2%) of respondents and SEI in 43.9% (36.5%-51.3%) of the AK population. In total, 87.1% (82.1%-92.1%) of AK occupational diseases were not declared. In total, 57.7% of respondents took 9.4 ± 6.2 days of sick leave, mostly unofficial, and 95.7% stopped surgeries for 13.0 ± 6.6 days. Among the AK population, 39.8% had current sequelae, with 17.5% having persistent SEIs, 19.9% using current therapy, and 16.4% experiencing continuing discomfort. SEIs were associated with wearing contact lenses (odds ratio 3.31, 95% confidence interval 1.19-9.21) and smoking (4.07, 1.30-12.8). Corticosteroid therapy was associated with a greater number of sequelae (3.84, 1.51-9.75). CONCLUSIONS: AK and SEI affect a large proportion of ophthalmologists and orthoptists, possibly for years, with high morbidity leading to occupational discomfort. Few practitioners asked for either to be recognized as an occupational disease. Associated factors would require a dedicated study.


Subject(s)
Adenovirus Infections, Human/complications , Eye Infections, Viral/complications , Keratoconjunctivitis/complications , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Orthoptics/statistics & numerical data , Risk Assessment/methods , Vision, Low/etiology , Adenovirus Infections, Human/epidemiology , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Eye Infections, Viral/epidemiology , Female , Follow-Up Studies , France/epidemiology , Humans , Keratoconjunctivitis/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Morbidity/trends , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , Surveys and Questionnaires , Time Factors , Vision, Low/epidemiology , Visual Acuity , Young Adult
2.
Int Ophthalmol ; 41(4): 1261-1269, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1826668

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: The coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) has become a difficult pandemic to control worldwide. The high transmission risk and mortality rates of COVID-19 cause serious concerns in ophthalmologists and may cause disruptions in clinical functioning. This study aims to identify changes in the clinical approaches of ophthalmologists, understand their anxiety levels, and exhibit how patients' follow-up processes progress during the pandemic. METHODS: A questionnaire that including demographic information, ophthalmology clinical activity scale, and Beck anxiety scale was sent to ophthalmologists in Turkey. Google Forms was used as a survey platform in this study. RESULTS: A total of 121 ophthalmologists participated in the study. The participants stated that they could not continue routine interventional diagnosis and treatment practices during the outbreak. It was clearly stated that there were changes in their clinical approach and decreased patient examination quality. For this reason, 14.9% of physicians said to missed the diagnosis in this process. Physicians who encounter infected patients state that it is more difficult to provide ophthalmological services and their clinical approaches are affected more negatively. Anxiety levels of physicians who could access personal protective equipment (PPE) and show positive solidarity with their colleagues in the process were found to be lower. CONCLUSION: Our study revealed that ophthalmologists, like other healthcare professionals, were severely affected by the COVID-19 outbreak. Accordingly, healthcare managers should provide adequate PPE for ophthalmologists, organize the clinical operation, and support the mental health of ophthalmologists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
3.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(4): 1092-1098, 2022 04.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1760970

ABSTRACT

An essential part of the teaching-learning paradigm is assessment. It is one of the ways to achieve feedback for the various methods that have been used to impart a particular skill. This is true of ophthalmology training, where various clinical and surgical skills are learned as part of the residency program. In preparation for residents to become proficient ophthalmologists, both formative and summative assessments are of paramount importance. At present, assessment is primarily summative in the form of a university examination, including theory and practical examinations that are conducted at the end of the three years of residency. A formative assessment can make course corrections early on, allowing for an improved understanding of the subject and the acquisition of clinical and surgical skills. Formative assessments also allow us to customize the teaching methodology considering individual residents' learning capabilities. In addition, formative assessments have the advantage of alleviating the stress of a "final" examination, which could sometimes result in a less-than-optimum performance by the residents. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced us to adopt new teaching methods, which has led to the adoption of changes in assessment. In this regard, we discuss the different assessment tools available, their pros and cons, and how best these tools can be made applicable in the setting of an ophthalmology residency program.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Ophthalmology/education , Pandemics
4.
Vestn Oftalmol ; 138(1): 52-56, 2022.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1727030

ABSTRACT

The article presents a case of complicated viral conjunctivitis. Conjunctivitis was the initial sign of the new coronavirus infection (COVID-19) in the patient. The disease had a fairly long course and led to symmetrical scarring in the form of partial external symblepharon and dry eye syndrome. Ophthalmologists should be aware about this disease and its complications. Early treatment with corticosteroids in combination with symptomatic therapy can contribute to prevention of the development of conjunctival scarring. In addition to conjunctival scarring, this disease can possibly potentiate the development of keratitis, optic neuritis, and uveitis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Conjunctivitis, Viral , Conjunctivitis , Ophthalmologists , COVID-19/diagnosis , Conjunctivitis/diagnosis , Conjunctivitis/etiology , Conjunctivitis, Viral/complications , Conjunctivitis, Viral/etiology , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
5.
Trends Mol Med ; 26(6): 529-531, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1720652

ABSTRACT

The current coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is rapidly spreading around the world. The first doctor to report this new disease was an ophthalmologist: this exemplifies the role of ophthalmologists in an infectious disease pandemic. Here we review how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) affects the eye and discuss implications for ophthalmologists.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Conjunctiva/virology , Conjunctivitis, Viral/virology , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , COVID-19 , Conjunctivitis, Viral/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Eye/virology , Humans , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , SARS-CoV-2
7.
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus ; 59(3): 145-150, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1591667

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To report the use of protective personal equipment (PPE) during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. METHODS: A 12-question multiple-choice survey was posted on a discussion board used by members of the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS). Respondents provided information about their experience, PPE use, office equipment, and approach to care during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: One hundred twenty-eight pediatric ophthalmologists completed the survey. Eighty-seven (68.0%) identified as in private practice, whereas 41 (32.0%) identified as in an academic setting. Sixty-nine pediatric ophthalmologists (53.9%) reported routinely using N95 respirators, 72 (56.3%) reported wearing medical scrubs, 41 (32.0%) reported using disposable gloves, 33 (25.7%) reported wearing goggles, and 12 (9.4%) reported using face shields during office examinations. One hundred twenty-one pediatric ophthalmologists (94.5%) reported having slit lamps with plastic shields and 52 (40.6%) reported having phoropters with plastic shields. Ninety-nine (77.3%) responded that they would see a patient older than 2 years who refused to wear a mask for a nonemergency visit. CONCLUSIONS: Practice patterns of pediatric ophthalmologists have varied during the COVID-19 pandemic. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2022;59(3):145-150.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , Plastics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
8.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(50): e28192, 2021 Dec 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1583958

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The study aims to investigate the prevalence of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection among ophthalmology unit staff throughout the first and second waves of the outbreak, in order to verify the effectiveness of the measures adopted in containing the contagion.A retrospective observational study was conducted involving staff members, who received a naso/oropharyngeal swab when complaining of SARS-CoV-2 symptoms and once a month as a screening measure. They were tested for SARS-CoV-2 antibodies as a screening measure during the first and the second wave. Clinical activities performed during the outbreak were compared with those performed during the same period in 2019 and correlated with the number of coronavirus disease-2019 eye care workers.Analysis included 25 workers. Clinical infection was 0% and 12% whereas the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies ranged from 4% to 8% in the first and second wave, respectively. The increase in the prevalence of SARS-CoV-2 infection between the first and the second wave was not significant (1/25 vs 3/25, P = .6092). Clinical activities significantly decreased during the first wave compared with the same period in 2019 (3256 vs 10,075, P < .0001, -68% to 2019), but increased during the second wave (8208 vs 3256, P < .0001, +152% to the first wave).Despite the increase in routine activities during the second wave, we did not observe a significant increase in SARS-CoV-2 prevalence. Strict protection measures seemed to contain the rate of contagion among the ophthalmology unit members even in a high-volume clinical setting in one of the most affected area by the coronavirus disease-2019 outbreak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Antibodies, Viral/isolation & purification , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2
9.
PLoS One ; 16(11): e0260594, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1546960

ABSTRACT

Telemedicine can be used to conduct ophthalmological assessment of patients, facilitating patient access to specialist care. Since the teleophthalmology models require data collection support from other health professionals, the purpose of our study was to assess agreement between the nursing technician and the ophthalmologist in acquisition of health parameters that can be used for remote analysis as part of a telemedicine strategy. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 140 patients referred to an ophthalmological telediagnosis center by primary healthcare doctors. The health parameters evaluated were visual acuity (VA), objective ophthalmic measures acquired by autorefraction, keratometry, and intraocular pressure (IOP). Bland-Altman plots were used to analyze agreement between the nursing technician and the ophthalmologist. The Bland-Altman analysis showed a mean bias equal to zero for the VA measurements [95%-LoA: -0.25-0.25], 0.01 [95%-LoA: -0.86-0.88] for spherical equivalent (M), -0.08 [95%-LoA: -1.1-0.95] for keratometry (K) and -0.23 [95%-LoA: -4.4-4.00] for IOP. The measures had a high linear correlation (R [95%CI]: 0.87 [0.82-0.91]; 0.97 [0.96-0.98]; 0.96 [0.95-0.97] and 0.88 [0.84-0.91] respectively). The results observed demonstrate that remote ophthalmological data collection by adequately trained health professionals is viable. This confirms the utility and safety of these solutions for scenarios in which access to ophthalmologists is limited.


Subject(s)
Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Intraocular Pressure , Nursing Staff , Ophthalmologists , Telemedicine , Tonometry, Ocular , Adult , Aged , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmology , Primary Health Care
10.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(12): 3638-3642, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538654

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the ophthalmic practice pattern among ophthalmologists in India amidst the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: An online questionnaire-based analysis was performed among members of the All India Ophthalmological Society (AIOS) and results were analyzed using SPSS software version 20. RESULTS: A total of 2253 responses were received. The majority of the participants (72.6%) were between 30 and 60 years of age and were into private practice (64.7%). During the lockdown, over one-third of participant ophthalmologists reported not attending any OPD patients, whereas a majority (64%) provided only emergency ophthalmic services. During the COVID-19 pandemic, <15% surgeries were performed compared to the pre-COVID-19 era by 81% of participants, whereas elective surgeries were performed by only 4.3%. The proportion of participants utilizing telemedicine in ophthalmology showed a two-fold rise from the pre-COVID-19 era (21.9%) to the COVID-19 pandemic (46%). Over half of the participants reported following the AIOS guidelines, reducing clinic hours, use of screening questionnaires, minimizing staff, and use of breath shield on a slit lamp as precautionary measures to reduce the exposure. Over 95% of ophthalmologists were satisfied (score > 5/10) by the AIOS guidelines for ophthalmic practice during COVID-19. CONCLUSION: COVID-19 pandemic has adversely affected the ophthalmic care services across India with telemedicine emerging as a major rescue. The majority of practicing ophthalmologists are satisfied with guidelines provided by AIOS for ophthalmic care during the COVID-19 pandemic and have implemented the same in their setup.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) ; 10(6): 521-529, 2021 Nov 24.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1537585

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) came under the attention of the international medical community when China first notified the World Health Organization of a pneumonia outbreak of then-unknown etiology in Wuhan in December 2019. Since then, COVID-19 caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has appalled the world by spreading at a pandemic speed. Although ophthalmologists do not directly engage in the clinical care of COVID-19 patients, the ophthalmology community has become aware of the close ties between its practice and the pandemic. Not only are ophthalmologists at heightened risk of SARS-CoV-2 exposure due to their physical proximity with patients in routine ophthalmic examinations, but SARS-CoV-2 possesses ocular tropism resulting in ocular complications beyond the respiratory tract after viral exposure. Furthermore, patients could potentially suffer from adverse ocular effects in the therapeutic process. This review summarized the latest literature to cover the ophthalmic manifestations, effects of treatments, and vaccinations on the eye to aid the frontline clinicians in providing effective ophthalmic care to COVID-19 patients as the pandemic continues to evolve.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination/adverse effects
13.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1956-1959, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500884

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in eye healthcare workers (EHCW) in the largest ophthalmology centre in Guatemala and factors associated with antibody positivity. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional sero-survey in all the staff at the largest ophthalmology centre in Guatemala. Serum samples were collected and tested for total antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 employing Roche Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Immunoassay. Results were reported as reactive or non-reactive. According to patient exposure the staff were divided into low risk (technicians, domestic and administrative staff) and high risk (nurses, ophthalmologists, anaesthesiologists, and optometrists). Among those with positive antibodies, they were given a survey that included demographic characteristics, COVID-19 exposure, and related symptomatology. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with antibody positivity. RESULTS: On November 25th a total of 94 healthcare workers were sero-surveyed, mean age was 34.15 years (±8.41), most (57.44%) were females. Seroprevalence was 18%, the majority (77%) were in the low-risk group; while 64% at high-risk, tested negative. Those at low exposure, were five times more likely to have antibodies than those at high exposure (OR:5.69; 95% CI 1.69-19.13). Age and gender were not associated to seropositivity. CONCLUSIONS: We found a similar seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in EHCW to what has been reported in other healthcare groups. Seropositivity was higher among HCW with fewer patient exposure, hence the probability of community transmission.Key messagesEven though eye healthcare workers are believed to be at higher risk of infection, the prevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in this group is comparable to what has been reported previously in other healthcare groups.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guatemala/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Serologic Tests
14.
Turk J Ophthalmol ; 51(5): 269-281, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497595

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the effect of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the clinical practice of ophthalmologists in our country. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 22 questions was delivered to 250 ophthalmologists via e-mail and a smartphone messaging application. A total of 113 ophthalmologists completed the survey. The questions included the participants' demographic data (age, years in practice, institution, and city), changes in their working conditions and institutional preventive measures implemented during the pandemic, their personal COVID-19 experiences, the prevalence of telemedicine applications, and their attitudes toward these practices. Results: Nearly half (47.8%) of the 113 ophthalmologists were 36 to 45 years old. In terms of years in practice, the largest proportion of respondents (28.3%) had 6-10 years of experience. Most of the participants worked in private/foundation universities (37.2%), while 22.1% worked in education and research clinics. Participants working at public universities most often reported that they or a close contact had to work in COVID wards (89.5%). Triage was performed in 51.5% of ophthalmology outpatient clinics, with 88.0% of these participants reporting that patients with fever, cough, or dyspnea were directed to the pandemic clinic without ophthalmological examination. All participants working in public hospitals, education and research clinics, and public university hospitals had postponed elective surgeries, whereas 12.5% of those working in private practice and 20.5% of those working in private/foundation universities reported that they continued elective surgeries. While 80.8% of the participants did not conduct online interviews or examinations, 40.4% stated that they considered telemedicine applications beneficial. Seventy-seven percent of participants expressed concern about a decrease in their income during the pandemic, with this being especially common among participants working in private practice (87.5%) and private/foundation university hospitals (85.7%). Conclusion: Ophthalmologists across our country have been affected by this pandemic at a level that will change their clinical approach. We think that ophthalmologists impacted by the difficulty of providing personal protective equipment and economic concerns should be supported more during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Delivery of Health Care , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Surveys , Hospitals, Private , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Patient Care , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Turkey/epidemiology
15.
Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina ; 52(10): 556-559, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478171

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases as of February 1, 2021 and the proportion of ophthalmologists in the United States older than age 60 years to provide a framework for successful vaccine distribution for the ophthalmology workforce. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Association of American Medical Colleges ophthalmologist workforce dataset (from 2019) for each state was combined with John Hopkins University's COVID-19 tracking data to determine exposure risk for ophthalmologists, especially those older than age 60 years. RESULTS: Of the 18,915 practicing ophthalmologists in the US, 37.6% are older than age 60 years. North Dakota (48.4%), Connecticut (46.8%), and Maine (46.7%) have the highest percentages. South Dakota (9,567), Utah (7,559), and Idaho (7,411) currently have the highest COVID-19 exposure burden per ophthalmologist older than age 60 years as of February 1, 2021. CONCLUSION: Care must be taken to distribute the COVID-19 vaccine in a safe and proactive manner to ophthalmologists that face high exposure risk, both to ensure physician safety and ensure adequate care for the population they serve. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2021;52:556-559.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
16.
Front Public Health ; 9: 725648, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1456304

ABSTRACT

Background: Lack of quantification of direct and indirect exposure of ophthalmologists during ophthalmic diagnostic process makes it hard to estimate the infectious risk of aerosol pathogen faced by ophthalmologists at working environment. Methods: Accurate numerical models of thermal manikins and computational fluid dynamics simulations were used to investigate direct (droplet inhalation and mucosal deposition) and indirect exposure (droplets on working equipment) within a half-minute procedure. Three ophthalmic examination or treatment scenarios (direct ophthalmoscopic examination, slit-lamp microscopic examination, and ophthalmic operation) were selected as typical exposure distance, two breathing modes (normal breathing and coughing), three levels of ambient RH (40, 70, and 95%) and three initial droplet sizes (50, 70, and 100 µm) were considered as common working environmental condition. Results: The exposure of an ophthalmologist to a patient's expiratory droplets during a direct ophthalmoscopic examination was found to be 95 times that of a person during normal interpersonal interaction at a distance of 1 m and 12.1, 8.8, and 9.7 times that of an ophthalmologist during a slit-lamp microscopic examination, a surgeon during an ophthalmic operation and an assistant during an ophthalmic operation, respectively. The ophthalmologist's direct exposure to droplets when the patient cough-exhaled was ~7.6 times that when the patient breath-exhaled. Compared with high indoor RH, direct droplet exposure was higher and indirect droplet exposure was lower when the indoor RH was 40%. Conclusion: During the course of performing ophthalmic examinations or treatment, ophthalmologists typically face a high risk of SARS-CoV-2 infection by droplet transmission.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Computer Simulation , Exhalation , Humans , SARS-CoV-2
17.
J AAPOS ; 25(5): 293-295.e1, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1440137

ABSTRACT

Understanding provider perspectives on telemedicine adoption during the COVID-19 pandemic can help inform best practices for delivering pediatric ophthalmic care safely and remotely. In this online survey distributed to two national pediatric ophthalmology list-servs, respondents in July-August 2020 (n = 104) compared with respondents in March-April 2020 (n = 171) were more likely to report not using and not planning on using telemedicine. The July-August respondents who did not use telemedicine were concerned about the limitations in care provided, challenges with implementation, and perceived negative effects on the doctor-patient relationship. These findings demonstrate a lack of sustained uptake of telemedicine in the first 6 months of the pandemic and concerns that should be addressed to facilitate integration of this approach in pediatric ophthalmic care.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Telemedicine , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Physician-Patient Relations , SARS-CoV-2
18.
Psychol Rep ; 124(5): 2139-2154, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1390400

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prevalence of occupational burnout among ophthalmologists in order to better understand the mental and physical well-being of eye physicians and surgeons in the professional workplace. STUDY DESIGN: A systematic review and meta-analysis. METHODS: Online computer databases MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, and ProQuest Dissertations and Theses were searched systematically and thoroughly. Conferences held through Association for Research in Vision and Ophthalmology, American Academy of Ophthalmology, and Canadian Society of Ophthalmology were searched. Studies were screened using Covidence software. Data on reported burnout prevalence was extracted. STATA 15.0 was used to conduct meta-analysis.Synthesis: Our search strategy identified 318 records from online databases and 11 records from grey literature search, which were screened at 2-levels. Title and abstracts of each record were screened resulting in 24 records moving to full-text screening. Total of 9 records were utilized for quantitative analysis in the data extraction stage. Our results indicated significant professional burnout among ophthalmologists (ES = 0.41; CI: [0.26, 0.56]) with significant emotional exhaustion (ES = 0.43; CI: [0.33, 0.53]), depersonalization (ES = 0.29; CI: [0.13, 0.46]), and a low sense of personal accomplishment (ES = 0.36; CI: [0.08, 0.63]). CONCLUSIONS: Significant occupational burnout among ophthalmologists is concerning because burnout can have a negative effect on the physical and mental health of eye physicians and surgeons. It could impact productivity, cutbacks in work hours, or lead to early retirement from the profession. Contributing factors in ophthalmologist burnout including work overload need to be addressed in a timely manner.


Subject(s)
Burnout, Professional , Ophthalmologists , Burnout, Professional/epidemiology , Burnout, Psychological , Canada , Humans , Prevalence
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