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2.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1956-1959, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500884

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in eye healthcare workers (EHCW) in the largest ophthalmology centre in Guatemala and factors associated with antibody positivity. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional sero-survey in all the staff at the largest ophthalmology centre in Guatemala. Serum samples were collected and tested for total antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 employing Roche Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Immunoassay. Results were reported as reactive or non-reactive. According to patient exposure the staff were divided into low risk (technicians, domestic and administrative staff) and high risk (nurses, ophthalmologists, anaesthesiologists, and optometrists). Among those with positive antibodies, they were given a survey that included demographic characteristics, COVID-19 exposure, and related symptomatology. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with antibody positivity. RESULTS: On November 25th a total of 94 healthcare workers were sero-surveyed, mean age was 34.15 years (±8.41), most (57.44%) were females. Seroprevalence was 18%, the majority (77%) were in the low-risk group; while 64% at high-risk, tested negative. Those at low exposure, were five times more likely to have antibodies than those at high exposure (OR:5.69; 95% CI 1.69-19.13). Age and gender were not associated to seropositivity. CONCLUSIONS: We found a similar seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in EHCW to what has been reported in other healthcare groups. Seropositivity was higher among HCW with fewer patient exposure, hence the probability of community transmission.Key messagesEven though eye healthcare workers are believed to be at higher risk of infection, the prevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in this group is comparable to what has been reported previously in other healthcare groups.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guatemala/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Serologic Tests
3.
Turk J Ophthalmol ; 51(5): 269-281, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497595

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the effect of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the clinical practice of ophthalmologists in our country. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 22 questions was delivered to 250 ophthalmologists via e-mail and a smartphone messaging application. A total of 113 ophthalmologists completed the survey. The questions included the participants' demographic data (age, years in practice, institution, and city), changes in their working conditions and institutional preventive measures implemented during the pandemic, their personal COVID-19 experiences, the prevalence of telemedicine applications, and their attitudes toward these practices. Results: Nearly half (47.8%) of the 113 ophthalmologists were 36 to 45 years old. In terms of years in practice, the largest proportion of respondents (28.3%) had 6-10 years of experience. Most of the participants worked in private/foundation universities (37.2%), while 22.1% worked in education and research clinics. Participants working at public universities most often reported that they or a close contact had to work in COVID wards (89.5%). Triage was performed in 51.5% of ophthalmology outpatient clinics, with 88.0% of these participants reporting that patients with fever, cough, or dyspnea were directed to the pandemic clinic without ophthalmological examination. All participants working in public hospitals, education and research clinics, and public university hospitals had postponed elective surgeries, whereas 12.5% of those working in private practice and 20.5% of those working in private/foundation universities reported that they continued elective surgeries. While 80.8% of the participants did not conduct online interviews or examinations, 40.4% stated that they considered telemedicine applications beneficial. Seventy-seven percent of participants expressed concern about a decrease in their income during the pandemic, with this being especially common among participants working in private practice (87.5%) and private/foundation university hospitals (85.7%). Conclusion: Ophthalmologists across our country have been affected by this pandemic at a level that will change their clinical approach. We think that ophthalmologists impacted by the difficulty of providing personal protective equipment and economic concerns should be supported more during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Delivery of Health Care , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Surveys , Hospitals, Private , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Patient Care , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Turkey/epidemiology
5.
Ophthalmic Epidemiol ; 28(4): 322-329, 2021 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1221337

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To assess the magnitude of mental health problems among ophthalmologists in India post lockdown during COVID pandemic.Method: Cross-sectional survey conducted online on registered practising ophthalmologists of India, post lockdown at the start of elective surgeries (20th to 25th May, 2020). The degree of symptoms of depression, anxiety and stress was assessed by DASS -21 questionnaire. DASS -Subscales: DASS- D (depression), DASS- A (anxiety) and DASS-S (stress) and grading of severity (mild, moderate, severe) were analysed.Results: A total of 144 ophthalmologists aged 29-72 years responded to online survey. Of all participants, 94 (64.2%) of ophthalmologists suffered from mental health problems. Seventy six (52.7%) ophthalmologists had depression and anxiety whereas 20 (14%) reported stress. Women ophthalmologists scored highest total DASS mean score and DASS-stress mean score (p = .04 and p = .03). Results of DASS-D and DASS-A showed female preponderance (men vs women 42.5% vs 61.5%, p = .02; 42.5% vs 60%, p = .04). Severity of symptoms revealed that ophthalmologists above 40 years of age with more than 10 years' experienced severe stress (p = .005). Comprehensive ophthalmologists presented with severe stress and ophthalmologists practicing speciality with severe anxiety. Pearson's correlation analysis showed positive correlation between total DASS-21 score with each of the three subscales scores (DASS D, r-0.88: p < .001; DASS-A, r = 0.96: p = <0.001; DASS-S, r = 0.95: p < .001).Conclusion: Screening by Dass-21 scale has brought noticeable transient mental health issue among ophthalmologist to the fore. Few with high risk may require professional mental care to alleviate it.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Depression/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surgeons/psychology , Adult , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , India , Male , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
6.
Turk J Ophthalmol ; 51(2): 95-101, 2021 04 29.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1218682

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To assess the effects of the coronavirus disease-2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on Turkish ophthalmologists. Materials and Methods: In this survey study, an online questionnaire consisting of 40 questions was directed to actively working ophthalmologists. The questions asked about demographic characteristics, working conditions and schedule, follow-up of ophthalmology patients, and levels of knowledge and anxiety about the pandemic. Results: This study included 161 ophthalmologists (78 women and 83 men). They were predominantly consultant ophthalmologists (71%), with 128 living in metropolitan areas. More than half (54.4%) reported decreased weekly working hours, 52.5% were attending routine outpatient clinics, 52.8% were working in COVID-19-related units, 67.1% were performing only emergency operations, and 52% reported disrupted follow-up of chronic eye patients. Sixty-four percent thought that ophthalmologists were in the high-risk group, and nearly all participants used masks while working (99%). Additionally, 91% expressed high anxiety regarding the pandemic, most commonly due to the risk of transmitting the disease to family (83%), and 12.5% considered their level of knowledge about the pandemic to be insufficient. Forty-six percent of the participants thought that daily life conditions would normalize in 2 to 5 months. Conclusion: Close proximity during patient examination causes ophthalmologists concern about their risk. The increasing number of COVID-19 cases resulted in a proportional decrease in the number of patients and surgeries in ophthalmology clinics in our country. As a result, ophthalmologists are unwillingly appointed to high-risk units. The COVID-19 pandemic has caused a substantial increase in anxiety levels among Turkish ophthalmologists.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Health Knowledge, Attitudes, Practice , Ophthalmologists/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , COVID-19/transmission , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Turkey/epidemiology
7.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(4): 951-957, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138819

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To ascertain ophthalmologist's perceptions about webinars as a method of continued medical education during the COVID-19 pandemic. Methods: In a cross-sectional study, a 21-question survey was circulated using digital media platform to approximately 1400 ophthalmologists in India between 16th August 2020 to 31st August 2020. The questionnaire focussed on the quality and usefulness of webinars based on the Bloom's taxonomy. The responses (on 4- or 5-point Likert scale) were analyzed among three professional groups- ophthalmologists in-training, consultants in public sector, and private practitioners. Results: 393 ophthalmologists participated in the survey, with a response rate of 28%. The mean age was 34.6 ± 9.7 years, and males constituted 49.6% (199/393) of the respondents. Forty-seven percent of the respondents perceived the quality of webinars as good or excellent (185/393), 72.8% reported knowledge gain from webinars (286/393), and 63.9% felt that webinars are important in clinical practice and should continue post-COVID-19 pandemic (251/393), with distinct responses among the professional groups. The drawbacks perceived were overt number of webinars (371; 94.4%), confusion regarding which webinars to attend (313; 79.6%), repetition of the information (296; 75.3%), limited opportunity for participant interaction (146; 37.2%) and disparate weightage to the core disciplines of Ophthalmology. Conclusion: Most respondents had favorable perceptions of Ophthalmology webinars happening during the COVID-19 pandemic. However, there is need for improvisation in the volume of webinars, target-audience-based delivery, and participant interaction to add value to this new dimension of teaching-learning.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Medical, Continuing/methods , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology/education , SARS-CoV-2 , Webcasts as Topic , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
8.
Ophthalmol Retina ; 4(12): 1181-1187, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-954085

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess perceptions of occupational risk and changes to clinical practice of ophthalmology trainees in the United States during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. DESIGN: An anonymous, nonvalidated, cross-sectional survey was conducted online. Data were collected from April 7 through 16, 2020. PARTICIPANTS: Second-year U.S. vitreoretinal surgery fellows in two-year training programs were invited to participate. METHODS: Online survey. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Survey questions assessed policies guiding COVID-19 response, exposure to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2, changes in clinical duties, and methods to reduce occupational risk, including availability of personal protective equipment (PPE). RESULTS: Completed responses were obtained from 62 of 87 eligible recipients (71.2% response rate). Training settings included academic (58.1%), hybrid academic/private practice (35.5%), and private practice only settings (6.5%). Overall, 19.4% of respondents reported an exposure to a COVID-19-positive patient, 14.5% reported self-quarantining due to possible exposure, and 11.3% reported being tested for COVID-19. In regards to PPE, N95 masks were available in the emergency room (n = 40 [64.5%]), office (n = 35 [56.5%]), and operating room (n = 35 [56.5%]) settings. Perceived comfort level with PPE recommendations was significantly associated with availability of an N95 respirator mask in the clinic (P < 0.001), emergency room (P < 0.001), or operating room (P = 0.002) settings. Additional risk mitigation methods outside of PPE were: reduction in patient volume (n = 62 [100%]), limiting patient companions (n = 59 [95.2%]), use of a screening process (n = 59 [95.2%]), use of a slit-lamp face shield (n = 57 [91.9%]), temperature screening of all persons entering clinical space (n = 34 [54.84%]), and placement of face mask on patients (n = 33 [53.2%]). Overall, 16.1% reported additional clinical duties within the scope of ophthalmology, and 3.2% reported being re-deployed to nonophthalmology services. 98.4% of respondents, 98.4% expected a reduction in surgical case volume. No respondents reported loss of employment or reduction in pay or benefits due to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Suspected or confirmed clinical exposure to COVID-19-positive patients occurred in approximately one fifth of trainee respondents. Perceived comfort level with PPE standards was significantly associated with N95 respirator mask availability. As surgical training programs grapple with the COVID-19 pandemic, analysis of trainees' concerns may inform development of mitigation strategies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Fellowships and Scholarships , Occupational Exposure , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Vitreoretinal Surgery/education , Adult , Attitude of Health Personnel , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/education , Perception , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Quarantine , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
9.
Semin Ophthalmol ; 35(5-6): 296-306, 2020 Aug 17.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-814029

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the concerns of the residents and young ophthalmologists as well as the change in their practice during the COVID era. DESIGN: This is an cross-sectional study. METHODS: A questionnaire was directed to the young Ophthalmologists of Ophthalmology department in Cairo University hospitals. The primary outcome measures were the effects of COVID-19 pandemic on ophthalmology practice. RESULTS: Seventy-nine young Ophthalmologists responded to the questionnaire, with an age ranging from 24 to 36 years of age of which 57% were females. They all practiced Ophthalmology from less than one year up to 9 years long, with 55.8% of them feeling unlucky starting ophthalmic practice during this era, 7.6% are extremely anxious regarding their psychological concern about the pandemic, and some feel they need psychological assessment especially those with 1-3 years duration of practice (41.2%) (p = .011) , especially females (82.4%, p = .015 ). As for access to PPE, 94.9% are wearing masks in the clinic, but only 8.9% of patients are wearing masks. Before this lockdown, 16.7% of the enrolled candidates attended on line lectures and webinars, but since then, this has significantly surged to 80.5% (p < .001) . CONCLUSION: Due to COVID-19 pandemic, as with everybody else, our young ophthalmologists have been affected on many different levels; psychologically, education and practice levels.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , Internship and Residency , Ophthalmologists/psychology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , COVID-19/transmission , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Female , Hospitals, University , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Ophthalmology/education , Personal Protective Equipment , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
14.
Middle East Afr J Ophthalmol ; 27(2): 79-85, 2020.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-714533

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the psychological impact and mental health outcomes including depression, anxiety, and insomnia during COVID-19 crisis among ophthalmologists. METHODS: This was a simple random study in which ophthalmologists practicing in Saudi Arabia were asked to fill in a self-administered online survey during the period from March 28, 2020, to April 04, 2020. Four validated psychiatric assessment tools were used to detect symptoms of depression, anxiety, insomnia, and stress perception. RESULTS: One hundred and seven participants successfully completed the survey with a response rate of 30.6%. Males constituted 56.1% (n = 60). Ophthalmology residents constituted the majority (n = 66, 61.7%). About half of the physicians exhibited symptoms of depression (n = 56, 50.5%), anxiety (n = 50, 46.7%), and insomnia (n = 48, 44.9%). Symptoms of stress ranged between low (28%), moderate (68.2%), and high (3.7%). According to the cutoff values for severe symptoms, 29% were identified as having depression, 38.3% had anxiety, and 15% had insomnia.Depression was found to be more common among female ophthalmologists (P = 0.06), those living with an elderly (P = 0.003), and fellows (P = 0.006). Female ophthalmologists suffering from anxiety were significantly more than male ophthalmologists (P = 0.046). There was a trend toward suffering from anxiety in frontline health-care providers (P = 0.139) and in ophthalmologists who are living with an elderly (P = 0.149). Female participants exhibited significantly more moderate-to-high symptoms of stress (P = 0.018). CONCLUSIONS: Ophthalmologists' psychological needs, females in particular, should be addressed appropriately during the COVID-19 pandemic. Establishing psychological support units, especially for high-risk individuals, should be considered to minimize psychological adverse effects.


Subject(s)
Anxiety/psychology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depression/psychology , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/psychology , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Adult , Anxiety/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus , COVID-19 , Coronavirus , Depression/epidemiology , Female , Health Personnel , Humans , Male , Needs Assessment , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Saudi Arabia/epidemiology , Sex Factors , Sleep Initiation and Maintenance Disorders/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
15.
Ophthalmologica ; 244(1): 76-82, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-690170

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To assess the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on ophthalmology practice in the Cairo metropolitan area. METHODS: This is a cross-sectional observational analytic study among ophthalmologists practicing in different hospitals in the Cairo metropolitan area. The data were collected through a self-administered questionnaire covering general measures taken during practice. RESULTS: The questionnaire was sent to 250 ophthalmologists, with an 82% response rate. Most of the participants were concerned about the economic impact of the pandemic, as there is a 60-80% reduction in the flow of patients with a consequent 80-100% reduction in surgical cases. Most of the participants have access to personal protective equipment, and the safety protocols are followed, especially by the older ophthalmologists. Thus, the surgeons are willing to perform elective surgeries, adhering to strict safety protocols (70.8, 42.6, and 18.8% of the refractive surgeons, corneal surgeons, and retinal surgeons, respectively; p = 0.00). Furthermore, 63.9% of the participants, especially the young ophthalmologists, are willing to see COVID-19 patients and operate on them if needed. CONCLUSIONS: The COVID-19 pandemic could go on for months or even years with a significant impact on ophthalmology practice. Trying to keep a balance between safety and economic burden, the majority of ophthalmologists are willing to see elective patients and urgently operate on a COVID-19 patient, under adherence to the safety protocols.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/trends , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Egypt/epidemiology , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires
16.
Telemed J E Health ; 27(2): 231-235, 2021 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-670175

ABSTRACT

Background: Ophthalmic clinicians report low confidence in telemedicine-based eye care delivery, but it may have changed given its rapid expansion during the coronavirus 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Introduction: The purpose of this study was to determine clinician confidence in telemedicine-based eye care services during COVID-19. Materials and Methods: An electronic survey was sent to clinicians at University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center (April 17, 2020-May 6, 2020) when nonemergent in-person visits and procedures were restricted. The primary outcome was clinician confidence in using telemedicine-based eye care during COVID-19. Secondary outcomes included telemedicine utilization and its association with clinician confidence using Fisher's exact test. Results: Of the 88 respondents (90.7% response rate; n = 97 total), 83.0% (n = 73) were ophthalmologists and 17.0% (n = 15) were optometrists. Telemedicine utilization increased from 30.7% (n = 27) before the pandemic to 86.2% (n = 75) after the pandemic. Clinicians' confidence in their ability to use telemedicine varied with 28.6% (24/84) feeling confident/extremely confident, 38.1% (32/84) somewhat confident, and 33.3% (28/84) not-at-all confident. Most felt that telemedicine was underutilized (62.1%; 54/87) and planned continued use over the next year (59.8%; 52/87). Confident respondents were more likely to have performed three or more telemedicine visits (p = 0.003), to believe telemedicine was underutilized (p < 0.001), and to anticipate continued use of telemedicine (p = 0.009). Discussion: The majority of clinicians were at least somewhat confident about using telemedicine during the pandemic. Clinician confidence was associated with telemedicine visit volume and intention to continue using telemedicine. Conclusions: Policies that foster clinician confidence will be important to sustain telemedicine-based eye care delivery.


Subject(s)
Attitude of Health Personnel , COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Telemedicine , Humans , Pandemics
18.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 138(8): 907-910, 2020 Aug 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-640020

ABSTRACT

Importance: The influence on the psychology and ocular surface of ophthalmologists and ophthalmic nurses in Wuhan, China, during the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic is not yet fully understood. Objective: To characterize mental state and ocular surface state of ophthalmologists and ophthalmic nurses in Wuhan, China, and similar areas during the COVID-19 outbreak. Design, Setting, and Participants: This survey study assessed ophthalmologists and ophthalmic nurses in Wuhan, China, and Jiangxi, China, a province approximately 300 km south of Wuhan. The Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, the Van Dream Anxiety Scale, and the Ocular Surface Disease Index were used to conduct questionnaire surveys via a messaging and social media app. Main Outcomes and Measures: Mean scores from the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (0-10 points), the Van Dream Anxiety Scale (0-100 points), and the Ocular Surface Disease Index (0-100 points). Results: Of 126 individuals, there were 42 ophthalmologists (33.3%) and 21 ophthalmic nurses (16.7%) from Wuhan and 42 ophthalmologists (33.3%) and 21 nurses (16.7%) from Jiangxi. The mean (SD) age of ophthalmologists was 36.1 (7.6) years in Wuhan and 41.2 (8.8) years in Jiangxi. For ophthalmic nurses, the mean (SD) age was 35.2 (7.4) years in Wuhan and 33.4 (7.9) years in Jiangxi. The response rate for ophthalmologists was 90.3% (84 of 93) and for nurses was 91.3% (42 of 46). The participation rate of ophthalmologists and nurses in Wuhan was 0.06% (42 of 70 000) and 0.07% (21 of 30 000), respectively; the participation rate in Jiangxi was 0.06% (42 of 70 000; 21 of 35 000) for both groups. In Wuhan, the mean (SD) Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (anxiety and depression were counted as separate scores), Van Dream Anxiety Scale, and the Ocular Surface Disease Index scores were 6.90 (2.30), 7.38 (2.19), 24.52 (5.86), and 43.90 (3.74), respectively, in ophthalmologists and 8.67 (3.04), 9.38 (2.64), 21.48 (6.15), and 40.05 (6.67), respectively, in ophthalmic nurses. In Jiangxi, these scores were 5.67 (2.89), 4.90 (3.15), 12.76 (7.27), and 38.79 (7.78), respectively, in ophthalmologists and 4.67 (3.20), 4.33 (3.23), 10.10 (7.62), and 41.52 (5.92), respectively, in ophthalmic nurses. The difference (95% CI) between the 2 regions for these scores in ophthalmologists was 2.48 (95% CI, 1.30-3.65), 11.76 (95% CI, 8.90-14.63), 5.12 (95% CI, 2.45-7.79), and 5.12 (95% CI, 2.47-7.77), respectively, and in ophthalmic nurses was 4.16 (95% CI, 2.05-5.95), 5.05 (95% CI, 3.21-6.89), 11.38 (95% CI, 7.06-15.70), and -1.48 (95% CI, -5.41 to 2.25), respectively. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that ophthalmologists and ophthalmic nurses in Wuhan experienced more anxiety and depression and reported greater ocular surface abnormalities than counterparts outside of Wuhan, but the wide CIs preclude concluding confidently that there were differences.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Stress, Psychological/etiology , COVID-19 , China/epidemiology , Comorbidity , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Eye Diseases/nursing , Eye Diseases/psychology , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Prognosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Stress, Psychological/psychology , Surveys and Questionnaires
19.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(6): 994-998, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-401232

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To evaluate the psychological impact of the COVID 19 crisis on ophthalmologists-in-training and practising ophthalmologists during lockdown in India. Methods: An online survey was completed by ophthalmologists and ophthalmology trainees during the lockdown. The information collected included demographics (age, gender), domicile (state, union territory), current professional status (in training or practising), type of practice (solo, group, institutional, governmental, non-governmental), marital status (married, single), impact of COVID-19 on their training or practice, and impact on income and ability to meet living expenses. Psychological distress was assessed using the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9). Results: In all, 2,355 ophthalmologists responded. Mean age was 42.5 (range, 25-82 years; SD, 12.05) years. Of these, 1,332 (56.7%) were males; 475 (20.2%) were still not in practice; 366 (15.5%) were single; 1,244 (52.8%) felt that COVID-19 would impact on their training or professional work; and 869 (37%) had difficulty in meeting their living expenses. The mean PHQ-9 score was 3.98 (range, 0-27; SD, 4.65). In terms of psychological impact, 768 (32.6%) had some degree of depression; mild in 504 (21.4%), moderate in 163 (6.9%), and severe in 101 (4.3%). Multivariable analysis showed that depression was significantly higher at younger age. The odds of depression decreased by 3% with 1 year increase in age. It was higher in non-practicing ophthalmologists, especially those who were considerably worried about their training or professional growth, and those with difficulty in meeting living expenses. Conclusion: A strikingly high proportion of ophthalmologists are psychologically affected and may require personalized mental health care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/psychology , Internship and Residency , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology/education , Pneumonia, Viral/psychology , Stress, Psychological/epidemiology , Students, Medical/psychology , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Depressive Disorder/epidemiology , Female , Health Surveys , Humans , India/epidemiology , Male , Middle Aged , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
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