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1.
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus ; 59(6): 362-368, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2143947

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To create a survey that assesses the economic factors impacting the viability of pediatric ophthalmology between January 2021 and July 2022. METHODS: A 12-question survey was distributed to United States-based pediatric ophthalmologists on the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus discussion board and various social media fora. Demographic, economic, and workforce pattern data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: A total of 243 pediatric ophthalmologists completed the survey. One hundred seven (44.0%) respondents reported a surgical revenue decrease between 10% and 25%, 117 (48.1%) a clinical revenue decrease of less than 10%, 111 (45.6%) an overall income decrease of less than 10%, and 127 (52.2%) an overhead cost increase between 10% and 25%. Seventy-two (29.6%) respondents reported subsidizing income with pursuits outside of pediatric ophthalmology, 27 (11.1%) stopped operating due to reimbursement cuts, 75 (30.8%) limited the number of Medicaid or other public funded patients, 16 (6.5%) retired in the past 3 years, and 92 (37.8%) would not recommend a resident pursue a pediatric ophthalmology fellowship. CONCLUSIONS: There is a potential upheaval in the field of pediatric ophthalmology marked by increasing levels of disillusionment among current providers, a progressive decline in the number of trainees pursuing fellowship programs, and workforce issues suggestive of diversification of practice patterns outside of pediatric ophthalmology. The current economic crisis, in conjunction with these complex workforce issues, is and will continue to create a shortage of practicing pediatric ophthalmologists, seriously limiting access to pediatric and adult strabismus eye care. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2022;59(6):362-368.].


Subject(s)
Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , Strabismus , United States , Adult , Humans , Child , Economic Factors , Income
2.
Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) ; 11(6): 567-568, 2022 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2135623
4.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 140(10): 935, 2022 10 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2084956

ABSTRACT

This Viewpoint discusses the role that the field of ophthalmology will continue to play in the identification, control, and treatment of novel pathogens.


Subject(s)
Communicable Diseases, Emerging , Ophthalmology , Humans , Communicable Diseases, Emerging/prevention & control
5.
Telemed J E Health ; 28(10): 1547-1551, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2062837

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To assess the COVID-19 exposure risk to consulting ophthalmologists and the pandemic effect on consultations at one of the most impacted hospital systems in New York. Methods: In a retrospective, cross-sectional study, ophthalmology consult notes and COVID-19 test results were collected from the electronic medical record from February to May in 2019 and 2020. Results: Of 2,215 total notes analyzed, consults decreased from 1,374 to 841 between years (p = 0.0002). In 2020, 22.5% of all consults were COVID tested and 2.4% were positive within 2 weeks of in-person evaluation. In 2020, 1.8% of consults were electronic. Ventilated patients increased between years (7.5% to 10.8%; p = 0.04). Conclusions: Although consultations decreased during the Spring 2020 peak, the majority (98.2%) remained as in-person evaluations. While few patients tested COVID positive, this likely reflects the limited availability of testing early in the pandemic. Consulting ophthalmologists remained at high risk of COVID-19 exposure during the pandemic peak.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , Referral and Consultation , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods
7.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(10): 3643-3648, 2022 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055704

ABSTRACT

Purpose: The objective of this survey-based study was to examine the effects of personal protective measures taken at the level of instrument and surgeon during the pandemic on the optics in ophthalmology. Methods: The study involved an online questionnaire of 24 questions which was distributed to ophthalmologists practicing in several hospitals, including residents and fellows undergoing training in ophthalmology in India. The responses were collected through an online data collection tool (Google forms). The participants could choose from multiple options provided to them in each question. Results: A total of 285 participants out of 296 had used modified methods for examining and performing surgical procedures during the pandemic, while 78.7% (265) of the participants acknowledged having encountered difficulty in interpreting the ocular findings of patients while examining in personal protective equipment. Moreover, 58.7% (198) of our study respondents also reported that there was significant worsening of the quality of ophthalmological examination with pandemic-appropriate measures and 84.8% (286) of our study participants also felt that these measures have significantly added to the time of examination, hence increasing the risk of exposure to both patient and doctor. Conclusion: The workplace study has highlighted the crucial aspects of optics in ophthalmology during the pandemic. The protective measures taken during the pandemic have significantly worsened the quality of ophthalmological examination and increased the time taken to perform outpatient department-based and surgical procedures in ophthalmology.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Ophthalmology/education , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment , SARS-CoV-2 , Surveys and Questionnaires
8.
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus ; 59(5): 285, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055519
9.
J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus ; 59(5): 291-295, 2022.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2055518

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To create a survey to assess the economic impact that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic post-mitigation (post-shutdown) has had on pediatric ophthalmologists. METHODS: A 14-question survey was disseminated to United States-based pediatric ophthalmologists on the American Association for Pediatric Ophthalmology and Strabismus (AAPOS) discussion board and on social media. Demographic data and data on the economic effect of the COVID-19 pandemic post-mitigation were collected. RESULTS: A total of 129 pediatric ophthalmologists completed the survey. Eighty-four (65.1%) respondents reported a clinical revenue decrease of greater than 10%, 83 (64.3%) a surgical decrease of greater than 10%, and 66 (51.2%) an income decrease of greater than 10%. Fifteen (11.6%) respondents reported limiting the number of Medicaid patients. This was more prevalent among those in private practice (P = .027). Twenty-seven (20.9%) pediatric ophthalmologists responded that they planned to retire earlier than anticipated because of the pandemic and 2 (1.6%) responded that they have retired since the start of the pandemic. Six (4.7%) respondents reported that they have sold their practice since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. CONCLUSIONS: Pediatric ophthalmologists continue to face economic challenges introduced by the COVID-19 pandemic. Reduced revenue may represent a new normal for the near future in pediatric ophthalmology. These unprecedented economic upheavals come at a time when the field of pediatric ophthalmology already faces difficulties with low reimbursement and attracting new trainees. This multitude of issues may escalate into a crisis in providing appropriate pediatric ophthalmic care. [J Pediatr Ophthalmol Strabismus. 2022;59(5):291-295.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , COVID-19/epidemiology , Child , Humans , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires , United States/epidemiology
10.
Trials ; 23(1): 823, 2022 Sep 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2053952

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Understanding public and patient attitudes to clinical research is paramount to successful recruitment. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to additional hurdles in achieving this. Our aim is to understand the current factors and attitudes towards clinical trial participation in order to assist in recruitment to clinical trials. METHODS: We conducted face-to-face interviews with patients in the outpatient department at a tertiary eye hospital facilitated by a 32-item questionnaire developed by the research team. Patient characteristics were correlated with their responses, in addition to qualitative thematic text analysis. RESULTS: A total of 53 patients were interviewed. Forty per cent indicated that they would be willing to participate in clinical research in the current climate. General motivating factors for involvement in research included personal gain, altruism and contribution to innovation. Factors limiting participation included concerns regarding own safety, inconvenience, accessibility and lack of benefit. 22.6% of participants felt that the COVID-19 pandemic has changed their outlook on research. These were categorised into positive (increased awareness of the importance and need for research, altruism) and negative (increased anxiety, need to minimise exposure to the hospital environment) influences. CONCLUSIONS: Factors influencing patients' decisions to participate in trials are similar to those observed prior to COVID-19 but with an increased focus on the environment the research is conducted in. The COVID-19 pandemic has had positive and negative impacts on patient attitudes towards research. Trial design, with a particular focus on setting and safety measures, in reassuring patients is increasingly important.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Patient Participation , Patient Selection , Clinical Trials as Topic , Humans , Outpatients , Pandemics , Surveys and Questionnaires
11.
JAMA Ophthalmol ; 140(8): 819-826, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2041192

ABSTRACT

Importance: Ocular trauma terminology should be periodically updated to enable comprehensive capturing and monitoring of ocular trauma in clinical and research settings. Objective: To update terminology for globe and adnexal trauma. Design, Setting, and Participants: A 2-round modified Delphi survey was conducted from January 1 to July 31, 2021, using an expert panel, including 69 ophthalmologists identified through their membership in ophthalmology (globe and adnexal trauma) societies. Consensus was defined as at least 67% expert agreement. A steering committee developed questions after identifying gaps in the current terminology via a targeted literature review. Round 1 sought consensus on existing and newly proposed terminology, and round 2 focused on unresolved questions from round 1. Experts included ophthalmologists who had managed, on average, 52 globe or adnexal trauma cases throughout their careers and/or published a total of 5 or more globe or adnexal trauma-related peer-reviewed articles. Main Outcomes and Measures: Expert consensus on ocular and adnexal terms. Results: A total of 69 experts participated in and completed round 1 of the survey. All 69 participants who completed round 1 were asked to complete round 2, and 58 responses were received. Consensus was reached for 18 of 25 questions (72%) in round 1 and 4 of 7 questions (57%) in round 2. Existing Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology system terminology achieved consensus of 84% (58 of 69 experts) in round 1 and 97% (56 of 58 experts) in round 2. Experts agreed on the need for further refinement of the definition of zones of injury (55 of 69 [80%]), as the zone affected can have a substantial effect on visual and functional outcomes. There was consensus that the mechanism of injury (52 of 69 [75%]) and status of the lacrimal canaliculi (54 of 69 [78%]), nasolacrimal ducts (48 of 69 [69%]), lens (46 of 58 [80%]), retina (42 of 58 [73%]), and central and paracentral cornea (47 of 58 [81%]) be included in the revised terminology. Conclusions and Relevance: There was consensus (defined as at least 67% expert agreement) on continued use of the existing Birmingham Eye Trauma Terminology system definitions and that additional terms are required to update the current ocular trauma terminology.


Subject(s)
Eye Injuries , Ophthalmology , Consensus , Delphi Technique , Eye Injuries/diagnosis , Humans , Surveys and Questionnaires
12.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(9): 3419, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2030161
13.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(8): 3129-3133, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2024719

ABSTRACT

We piloted an innovation in teaching by conducting live virtual bedside clinics and evaluated the effectiveness compared to conventional bedside clinics. The purpose is to report the methodology and survey results of this innovation in teaching. A virtual bedside clinic was set up utilizing multiple audio-visual aids at a tertiary eye care facility. The bedside clinic was conducted and streamed live to pre-registered participants across the globe using the Zoom platform. The online survey was conducted comparing its effectiveness with conventional bedside clinics. A total of five sessions were conducted. A total of 2058 participants registered (411/session), of which 938 (45.57%) attended (187/session). A total of 287 participants (30.6%) responded to the survey. The respondents included ophthalmology residents (43.4%), fellows (19%), sub-specialty ophthalmologists (15.4%), general ophthalmologists (12%), and optometrists (9%). More than 95% of the respondents felt that these clinics were equally effective/better in imparting the following: physical examination 97%, clinical knowledge 99.3%, clinical reasoning 98.3%, procedural skills 95%, and communication skills 96.5%. Respondents suggested that these clinics were better/equally effective in the following techniques: general examination (96%), ocular motility (93.3%), nystagmus evaluation (93.3%), and anterior (80%) and posterior segment examination (73.3%). The hybrid mode presentation (97.3%) and discussion with the panel (100%) were reported to be equally effective/much better. Live virtual bedside clinics are a novel and effective way of continuing quality teaching and impactful learning. Most of the bedside manners, procedural skills, and examination techniques can be effectively taught through this virtual platform with a scope to improve anterior and posterior segment examination skills.


Subject(s)
Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , Strabismus , Child , Humans , Learning , Ophthalmology/education , Physical Examination
14.
JAMA Netw Open ; 5(8): e2226292, 2022 08 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2013231

ABSTRACT

Importance: The hybrid ophthalmology telemedicine model asynchronously pairs an imaging appointment by a technician with a subsequent virtual appointment by a clinician. Although it has been mentioned in several studies as an alternative to standard in-person care during the COVID-19 pandemic, outcomes of this alternative clinical care model remain to be evaluated. Objective: To investigate the outcomes associated with the hybrid ophthalmology telemedicine model during the COVID-19 pandemic for nonurgent and nonprocedural ophthalmological care. Design, Setting, and Participants: Retrospective, cross-sectional study of all hybrid visits scheduled during the year 2020 in a single academic, hospital-based eye clinic in Boston, Massachusetts. All hybrid ophthalmology telemedicine visits completed in the year 2020 by opthalmologists and optometrists were included. Data were analyzed from January to December 2020. Exposures: Hybrid telemedicine clinical encounters. Main Outcomes and Measures: Four outcome metrics were calculated: (1) need for subsequent procedure visit, (2) medication change, (3) nonurgent, and (4) urgent consultation with another eye clinician. Adverse outcomes were defined as irreversible vision loss and the need for additional in-person evaluation to reach a management decision. Results: From April 9 to December 30, 2020, 889 patients (506 female patients [56.9%]; mean [SD] age, 62.1 [14.5] years; age range, 13-98 years) completed 940 hybrid visits. The most common visit indications were glaucoma (424 visits [45.1%]) and retinal diseases (499 visits [53.1%]). A total of 25 visits (2.7%) led to a procedure, 22 visits (2.3%) led to a change in medication, and 44 visits (4.7%) were referred for nonurgent consultation with another subspecialty with no instances of urgent referrals. Sixteen patients (1.7%) were referred to the on-call clinician for a same-day emergency in-person visit or recommended for a subsequent standard in-person visit to reach a management decision. There were no cases of irreversible vision loss following a hybrid visit. Conclusions and Relevance: These findings suggest that with the appropriate patient selection and clinical setting, the hybrid ophthalmology telemedicine model may be a good alternative to standard in-person visits, particularly for patients with glaucoma and retinal diseases.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Glaucoma , Ophthalmology , Retinal Diseases , Telemedicine , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Middle Aged , Outpatients , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , Telemedicine/methods , Young Adult
15.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(9): 3416-3418, 2022 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2010415

ABSTRACT

Mentor- mentee relationship in any discipline is a professional and interpersonal relationship. It associates a mentor with a protégé or a mentee. Mentoring is a serious business in Ophthalmology, both academically and surgically. The mentors act as role models for future generations by acting as a friend, coach, or guide to the mentee. They do so by giving valuable advice, moral support, and inculcating skills in a mentee. It is difficult to pinpoint the precise function of the mentor-mentee relationship, but the final goal is to achieve personal and professional objectives. In the current article, the authors have shed light on the imperative aspect of one's Ophthalmology career, i.e., the mentor-mentee relationship. This article describes various aspects of mentoring, the traits of a perfect mentor and mentee, the pre-requisites for a good mentee-mentor relationship, the hindrances and obstacles in a good relationship, and the impact of COVID-19 on the same. The potential goal of this article is to ignite the constructive spirit of the mentor-mentee relationship, encourage potential mentors to become ideal mentors, and potential mentees to gain from serious mentors.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Mentoring , Ophthalmology , Humans , Mentors , Program Evaluation , Research Personnel
16.
Neurology ; 99(9): 381-386, 2022 08 30.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009669

ABSTRACT

Acute vision loss related to cerebral or retinal ischemia is a time-sensitive emergency with potential treatment options including IV or intra-arterial thrombolysis and mechanical thrombectomy. However, patients either present in a delayed fashion or present to an emergency department that lacks the subspecialty expertise to recognize and treat these conditions in a timely fashion. Moreover, health care systems in the United States are becoming increasingly reliant on telestroke and teleneurology services for acute neurologic care, making the accurate diagnosis of acute vision loss even more challenging due to critical limitations to the remote video evaluation, including the inability to perform routine ophthalmoscopy. The COVID-19 pandemic has led to a greater reliance on telemedicine services and helped to accelerate the development of novel tools and care pathways to improve remote ophthalmologic evaluation, but these tools have yet to be adapted for use in the remote evaluation of acute vision loss. Permanent vision loss can be disabling for patients, and efforts must be made to increase and improve early diagnosis and management. Herein, the authors outline the importance of improving acute ophthalmologic diagnosis, outline key limitations and barriers to the current video-based teleneurology assessments, highlight opportunities to leverage new tools to enhance the remote assessment of vision loss, and propose new avenues to improve access to emergent ophthalmology subspecialty.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Telemedicine , Delivery of Health Care , Humans , Pandemics , United States
17.
BMC Health Serv Res ; 22(1): 1086, 2022 Aug 25.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-2009391

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Teleophthalmology has become the subject of heightened interest and scrutiny in the wake of the SARS-CoV-2 global pandemic. A streamlined implementation framework becomes increasingly important as demand grows. This study identified obstacles to teleophthalmology implementation through summative content analysis of key stakeholders' perceptions. DESIGN: Summative content analysis of transcribed interviews with key stakeholders (including patients, technicians, ophthalmic readers, staff, nurses, and administrators at two teleophthalmology clinic sites). METHODS: Keyword Were counted and compared to examine underlying meaning. Two analysts coded text independently using MAXQDA for summative qualitative content analysis to derive themes and hierarchical relationships as a basis for future refinement of TECS implementation. xMind ZEN was used to map conceptual relationships and overarching themes that emerged to identify perceived facilitators and barriers to implementation RESULTS: Analysis revealed two themes common to perceptions: (1) benefits of care, and (2) ease of implementation. Perceived benefits included efficiency, accessibility, and earlier intervention in disease course. The quality and quantity of training was heavily weighted in its influence on stakeholders' commitment to and confidence in the program, as were transparent organizational structure, clear bidirectional communication, and the availability of support staff. CONCLUSION: Using a determinant framework of implementation science, this report highlighted potential hindrances to teleophthalmology implementation and offered solutions in order to increase access to screening, improve the quality of care provided, and facilitate sustainability of the innovation.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Telemedicine , COVID-19/epidemiology , Humans , Pandemics , Qualitative Research , SARS-CoV-2
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