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1.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(1): 1-2, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594137
3.
Asia Pac J Ophthalmol (Phila) ; 10(6): 519-520, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1570110
4.
Ophthalmic Physiol Opt ; 42(1): 94-109, 2022 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1511366

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: Although urgent primary eye care schemes exist in some areas of England, their current safety is unknown. Accordingly, the aim of the present study was to quantify the clinical safety and effectiveness of a COVID-19 Urgent Eyecare Service (CUES) across Luton, Bedford, Hull, East Riding of Yorkshire and Harrogate. METHODS: Consenting patients with acute onset eye problems who had accessed the service were contacted to ascertain what the optometrist's recommendation was, whether this worked, if they had to present elsewhere and how satisfied they were with the CUES. RESULTS: A total of 27% (170/629) and 6.3% (28/445) of patients managed virtually and in person, respectively, did not have their acute eye problem resolved. Regression analysis revealed that patients who attended a face-to-face consultation were 4.66 times more likely to be correctly managed [Exp (ß) = 5.66], relative to those solely managed virtually. Optometrists' phone consultations failed to detect conditions such as stroke, intracranial hypertension, suspected space occupying lesions, orbital cellulitis, scleritis, corneal ulcer, wet macular degeneration, uveitis with macular oedema and retinal detachment. Of referrals to hospital ophthalmology departments, in total, 19% were false-positives. Patients, however, were typically very satisfied with the service. Uptake was associated with socioeconomic status. CONCLUSION: The present study found that a virtual assessment service providing optometrist tele-consultations was not effective at resolving patients' acute-onset eye problems. The range and number of pathologies missed by tele-consultations suggests that the service model in the present study was detrimental to patient safety. To improve this, optometrists should follow evidence based guidance when attempting to manage patients virtually, or in person. For example, patients presenting with acute-onset symptoms of flashing lights and/or floaters require an urgent dilated fundus examination. Robust data collection on service safety is required on an ongoing basis.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Optometry , England , Humans , Referral and Consultation , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders
5.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 03.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1502430

ABSTRACT

The ongoing outbreak of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has drastically affected medical societies. We aim to provide an overview and summarize the information published so far concerning the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on ophthalmology residency programs and the mental wellbeing of trainees, and to establish factors to help maintain successful residency training to ensure high-quality, specialist ophthalmic training. A literature search was conducted in October 2021 of the PubMed database for articles assessing the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the mental health of ophthalmology trainees and on ophthalmology residency programs. Cross-sectional survey studies, editorials, articles in scientific journals, letters to editors, and commentaries were considered; finally, 19 studies were included after excluding abstract-only publications and conference posters. The studies' demographic details, participant characteristics, interventions, outcomes, and limitations were extracted. Our summarized information showed the alarmingly significant impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on ophthalmology trainees' mental health and the associated considerable changes in ophthalmic training programs. Thus, in future, virtual training and surgical simulators should be permanently introduced, in addition to traditional teaching, to complete successful ophthalmology residency programs. Additionally, we emphasize the need for a widely facilitated and encouraged access to psychological support programs for healthcare workers, including ophthalmologists.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Ann Med ; 53(1): 1956-1959, 2021 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1500884

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in eye healthcare workers (EHCW) in the largest ophthalmology centre in Guatemala and factors associated with antibody positivity. METHODS: We conducted a cross sectional sero-survey in all the staff at the largest ophthalmology centre in Guatemala. Serum samples were collected and tested for total antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 employing Roche Elecsys Anti-SARS-CoV-2 Immunoassay. Results were reported as reactive or non-reactive. According to patient exposure the staff were divided into low risk (technicians, domestic and administrative staff) and high risk (nurses, ophthalmologists, anaesthesiologists, and optometrists). Among those with positive antibodies, they were given a survey that included demographic characteristics, COVID-19 exposure, and related symptomatology. Logistic regression was used to determine the factors associated with antibody positivity. RESULTS: On November 25th a total of 94 healthcare workers were sero-surveyed, mean age was 34.15 years (±8.41), most (57.44%) were females. Seroprevalence was 18%, the majority (77%) were in the low-risk group; while 64% at high-risk, tested negative. Those at low exposure, were five times more likely to have antibodies than those at high exposure (OR:5.69; 95% CI 1.69-19.13). Age and gender were not associated to seropositivity. CONCLUSIONS: We found a similar seroprevalence of SARS-CoV-2 antibodies in EHCW to what has been reported in other healthcare groups. Seropositivity was higher among HCW with fewer patient exposure, hence the probability of community transmission.Key messagesEven though eye healthcare workers are believed to be at higher risk of infection, the prevalence of antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 in this group is comparable to what has been reported previously in other healthcare groups.


Subject(s)
Antibodies, Viral/blood , COVID-19/epidemiology , Health Personnel/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Biomarkers/blood , COVID-19/diagnosis , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , COVID-19 Testing , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Guatemala/epidemiology , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Ophthalmology , SARS-CoV-2/genetics , Seroepidemiologic Studies , Serologic Tests
7.
Turk J Ophthalmol ; 51(5): 269-281, 2021 10 26.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1497595

ABSTRACT

Objectives: To investigate the effect of the novel coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on the clinical practice of ophthalmologists in our country. Materials and Methods: A questionnaire consisting of 22 questions was delivered to 250 ophthalmologists via e-mail and a smartphone messaging application. A total of 113 ophthalmologists completed the survey. The questions included the participants' demographic data (age, years in practice, institution, and city), changes in their working conditions and institutional preventive measures implemented during the pandemic, their personal COVID-19 experiences, the prevalence of telemedicine applications, and their attitudes toward these practices. Results: Nearly half (47.8%) of the 113 ophthalmologists were 36 to 45 years old. In terms of years in practice, the largest proportion of respondents (28.3%) had 6-10 years of experience. Most of the participants worked in private/foundation universities (37.2%), while 22.1% worked in education and research clinics. Participants working at public universities most often reported that they or a close contact had to work in COVID wards (89.5%). Triage was performed in 51.5% of ophthalmology outpatient clinics, with 88.0% of these participants reporting that patients with fever, cough, or dyspnea were directed to the pandemic clinic without ophthalmological examination. All participants working in public hospitals, education and research clinics, and public university hospitals had postponed elective surgeries, whereas 12.5% of those working in private practice and 20.5% of those working in private/foundation universities reported that they continued elective surgeries. While 80.8% of the participants did not conduct online interviews or examinations, 40.4% stated that they considered telemedicine applications beneficial. Seventy-seven percent of participants expressed concern about a decrease in their income during the pandemic, with this being especially common among participants working in private practice (87.5%) and private/foundation university hospitals (85.7%). Conclusion: Ophthalmologists across our country have been affected by this pandemic at a level that will change their clinical approach. We think that ophthalmologists impacted by the difficulty of providing personal protective equipment and economic concerns should be supported more during the pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmologists/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/trends , Practice Patterns, Physicians'/statistics & numerical data , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Aged , Delivery of Health Care , Elective Surgical Procedures/statistics & numerical data , Female , Health Surveys , Hospitals, Private , Hospitals, Public , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmologists/psychology , Patient Care , Personal Protective Equipment/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine , Turkey/epidemiology
8.
Vestn Oftalmol ; 137(5. Vyp. 2): 331-339, 2021.
Article in Russian | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478751

ABSTRACT

The review presents data on damage to the organ of vision in patients recovered from the new coronavirus infection reflecting on the results obtained by various researchers from examining patients with varying severity of the disease, both during the active stage and after recovery. Possible ways of transmission of the infectious agent into the organ of vision were analyzed. The most common ocular manifestation of COVID-19 is conjunctivitis, while lesions of the retina and optic nerve were noted less often. The article also outlines the strategy for treatment and describes infection prevention measures for doctors and patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Conjunctivitis , Eye Diseases/virology , COVID-19/complications , Conjunctivitis/virology , Humans , Ophthalmology , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina ; 52(10): 556-559, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1478171

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) cases as of February 1, 2021 and the proportion of ophthalmologists in the United States older than age 60 years to provide a framework for successful vaccine distribution for the ophthalmology workforce. PATIENTS AND METHODS: The Association of American Medical Colleges ophthalmologist workforce dataset (from 2019) for each state was combined with John Hopkins University's COVID-19 tracking data to determine exposure risk for ophthalmologists, especially those older than age 60 years. RESULTS: Of the 18,915 practicing ophthalmologists in the US, 37.6% are older than age 60 years. North Dakota (48.4%), Connecticut (46.8%), and Maine (46.7%) have the highest percentages. South Dakota (9,567), Utah (7,559), and Idaho (7,411) currently have the highest COVID-19 exposure burden per ophthalmologist older than age 60 years as of February 1, 2021. CONCLUSION: Care must be taken to distribute the COVID-19 vaccine in a safe and proactive manner to ophthalmologists that face high exposure risk, both to ensure physician safety and ensure adequate care for the population they serve. [Ophthalmic Surg Lasers Imaging Retina. 2021;52:556-559.].


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmologists , Ophthalmology , COVID-19 Vaccines , Humans , Middle Aged , Prevalence , SARS-CoV-2 , United States/epidemiology
10.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(10): 2853-2854, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441288

ABSTRACT

COVID-19 has immensely affected the training of ophthalmology residents; wet-lab training thus becomes of utmost importance. A simple cost-effective model for cataract surgery training of residents becomes the need of this hour. Hence, we aim to describe a new 'Do It Yourself' model with easily available material for beginners.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Internship and Residency , Ophthalmology , Phacoemulsification , Clinical Competence , Humans , Ophthalmology/education , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(10): 2880-2882, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441284
13.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(10): 2802-2807, 2021 Oct.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441268

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Severe acute respiratory syndrome-Coronavirus 2 pandemic has brought the world to a halt. We performed a questionnaire-based survey to know more about these issues which affected them due to this pandemic and resultant lockdown. Methods: A questionnaire-based survey (53 questions) was conducted online among Indian ophthalmologists with a 2-week response time. The invitation to participate was also circulated widely among various ophthalmologists as members on different social media platforms and emails. It was mandatory to answer all the questions in the questionnaire to make it a valid response. Results: A total of 903 responses were received across the country. A majority of these responses, 403 (44.6%), were from private practitioners. Almost 876 (97%) of the responders had either kept the daily working hours as same as pre-COVID-19 era or had reduced the actual working hours. Overall, 547 (60.6%) responders did not downsize their staff and 569 (63%) did not reduce the staff salary. Consultation charges were not revised by a majority (659, 73%) of responders. Total of 663 (73.4%) were following the appointment system and 702 (77.7%) responders had reduced the number of patients to less than 6 an hour. Only 106 (11.7%) were doing a mandatory RT-PCR test before surgery, whereas 567 (62.8%) did on the basis of suspicious symptoms. Conclusion: Our survey gives valuable inputs regarding the changes made by different ophthalmologist groups during the times of COVID-19 and lockdown.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(10): 2818-2823, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441267

ABSTRACT

Purpose: To describe the impact of lockdown and unlock phases of the COVID-19 pandemic on cataract surgery at a multitier ophthalmology network. Methods: This cross-sectional hospital-based study included 106,279 eyes operated between March 23, 2019 and March 31, 2021. The data of patients who underwent cataract surgery presenting during the lockdown and unlock phases were compared with the respective periods in the previous year before COVID-19. Results: The cataract surgeries performed decreased to 5.6% (839/14,994) of pre-COVID-19 volumes during the lockdown phase. There was a gradual recovery of the cataract surgeries performed to 86.7% of pre-COVID-19 volumes by May 2020 and exceeded by 17.9% by September 2020. There was a decrease in the number of women who underwent cataract surgery during the lockdown phase (49.11%) compared to the pre-COVID-19 (52.59%) or unlock phase (52.29%, P < 0.001). Patients operated during the lockdown phase were younger when compared to other groups (P < 0.001). The mean LogMAR presenting visual acuity at the time of surgery was worse in patients operated during the lockdown phase (1.84 ± 1.16) as compared to pre-COVID-19 (1.39 ± 1.05) and unlock phases (1.51 ± 1.08, P =<0.001). The proportion of patients with total cataracts were higher during the lockdown and unlock phases compared to the pre-COVID-19 phase (P < 0.001). Conclusion: The first year of the COVID-19 pandemic saw a drastic reduction in the surgical volume in the lockdown phase, which recovered quickly during the unlock period. Patients of younger age, male gender, poor presenting visual acuity, denser cataracts, and living close to the surgical center were able to access surgical care due to lockdown restrictions.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Cataract , Ophthalmology , Cataract/epidemiology , Communicable Disease Control , Cross-Sectional Studies , Female , Humans , Male , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
15.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257876, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1438352

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to evaluate the impact of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic on ophthalmology residency training in Poland. An anonymous self-administered online survey involving polish ophthalmology residents was conducted between February 15 and 28, 2021. Of the 126 residents who completed the survey, 88.9% (n = 112) and 89.7% (n = 113) felt that the COVID-19 pandemic had negatively impacted their surgical training and overall training programs, respectively. Trainees providing care to patients with COVID-19 and female trainees indicated a greater negative impact of the pandemic on the implementation of the specialization program (p = 0.008 and p = 0.015, respectively) and on the acquisition of practical skills (p = 0.014 and p = 0.021, respectively). Approximately 94% (n = 118) of the residents surveyed participated in virtual training during the pandemic, and 99.2% (n = 124) positively assessed the content and usefulness of online teaching in everyday clinical practice. The most common platforms used for online meetings were Zoom (62.7%, n = 79) and Microsoft Teams (50.8%, n = 64). Approximately 79% (n = 99) of residents believed that, after the pandemic is over, at least some of the training courses and conferences should be conducted online. In addition, 13.5% (n = 17) of residents reported that they would like to undergo training and specialization courses in virtual form only after the pandemic is over. In summary, the present findings indicate that the COVID-19 pandemic negatively impacted the implementation of the ophthalmology specialization program in Poland, with the greatest impact on surgical training. Trainees providing care to patients with COVID-19 are more likely to negatively assess the impact of the pandemic on the training process. Replacing traditional training with virtual methods was positively received by residents and considered very useful, and most residents reported a desire to maintain virtual training in ophthalmology in the future.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Education, Distance , Internship and Residency , Ophthalmology/education , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Female , Humans , Male , Poland/epidemiology
17.
Klin Monbl Augenheilkd ; 238(11): 1220-1228, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1413671

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To determine the effect of lockdown on medical care, with the example of ophthalmology. METHODS: Patients in a period during the first lockdown were compared to a non-lockdown period, with a total of 12 259 patients included in an observational study. Changes in different areas (elective, emergency, inpatients, surgeries) and eye care subspecialties were compared. Emergency patients were analyzed according to severity and urgency. Patients showing hints requiring treatment for urgent cardiovascular diseases were determined. Differences in patients who would have suffered severe vision loss without treatment were identified and the QALY (quality-adjusted life years) loss was determined accordingly. A model to prioritize patient visits after the end of lockdown or in future lockdown scenarios was developed. Data were collected at the University Eye Hospital LMU Munich and patient files were reviewed individually by ophthalmologists. RESULTS: The average patient number decreased by - 59.4% (p < 0.001), with a significant loss in all areas (elective, emergency, inpatients, surgeries; p < 0.001). There was a decline of - 39.6% for patients at high risk/high severity. Patients with indications of a risk factor of future stroke declined significantly (p = 0.003). QALY loss at the university eye hospital was 171, which was estimated to be 3160 - 24 143 for all of Germany. Working up high losses of outpatients during these 8 weeks of projected lockdown in Germany would take 7 - 23 weeks under normal circumstances, depending on ophthalmologist density. The prioritization model can reduce morbidity by up to 78%. CONCLUSION: There was marked loss of emergency cases and patients with chronic diseases. Making up for the losses in examinations and treatments will theoretically take weeks to months. To reduce the risk of morbidity, we recommend a prioritization model for rescheduling and future lockdown scenarios.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Ophthalmology , Communicable Disease Control , Humans , Patient Care , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2
18.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257250, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403322

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the many restrictions imposed during the COVID-19 emergency, the normal clinical activities have been stopped abruptly in view of limiting the circulation of the virus. The extraordinary containment measures have had a dramatic impact on the undertaking and follow-up of ophthalmic outpatients. OBJECTIVE: In order to guarantee proper monitoring and routine care, the Pediatric Ophthalmology equipe of Rovereto Hospital (North-East of Italy) supported by the Competence Center on Digital Health TrentinoSalute4.0, designed and implemented a digital platform, TreC Oculistica, enabling teleophthalmology. We report our innovative-albeit restricted-experience aiming at testing and maximizing the efficacy of remote ophthalmic and orthoptic visits. METHODS: A multidisciplinary team created the TreC Oculistica platform and defined a teleophthalmology protocol. The system consists of a clinician web interface and a patient mobile application. Clinicians can prescribe outpatients with the App and some preliminary measurements to be self-collected before the televisit. The App conveys the clinician's requests (i.e. measurements) and eases the share of the collected information in a secure digital environment, promoting a new health care workflow. RESULTS: Four clinicians took part in the testing phase (2 ophthalmologists and 2 orthoptists) and recruited 37 patients (mostly pediatric) in 3 months. Thanks to a continuous feedback between the testing and the technical implementation, it has been possible to identify pros and cons of the implemented functionalities, considering possible improvements. Digital solutions such as TreC Oculistica advance the digitalization of the Italian health care system, promoting a structured and effective reorganization of the workload supported by digital systems. CONCLUSIONS: The study tested an innovative digital solution in the teleophthalmology context and represented the first experience within the Italian healthcare system. This solution opens up new possibilities and scenarios that can be effective not only during the pandemic, but also in the traditional management of public health services.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Delivery of Health Care/methods , Mobile Applications , Ophthalmology/methods , Pandemics , Telemedicine/methods , Adolescent , Adult , Child , Child, Preschool , Female , Humans , Italy/epidemiology , Male , Young Adult
19.
Am J Ophthalmol ; 220: A8-A9, 2020 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1382158
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