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2.
Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci ; 25(6): 2726-2729, 2021 Mar.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1173123

ABSTRACT

This short communication described the actions taken in ophthalmic practice in Kabul, Afghanistan during the COVID-19 pandemic to effectively protect both patients and staff. By following World Health Organisation (WHO), international and local guidelines it has been possible to continue treating ophthalmic outpatients with minimum risk to both patients and staff. The changes which have been implemented may allow better overall infection control in the hospital which will continue to have benefits post-pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/therapy , Infection Control/methods , Ophthalmology/methods , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Afghanistan/epidemiology , COVID-19/transmission , COVID-19/virology , Eye Diseases/virology , Humans , Infection Control/statistics & numerical data , Ophthalmology/standards , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2/isolation & purification
4.
Acta Ophthalmol ; 99(7): e973-e983, 2021 Nov.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1024184

ABSTRACT

In the context of the COVID-19 pandemic, this paper provides recommendations for medical eye care during the easing of control measures after lockdown. The guidelines presented are based on a literature review and consensus among all Spanish Ophthalmology Societies regarding protection measures recommended for the ophthalmologic care of patients with or without confirmed COVID-19 in outpatient, inpatient, emergency and surgery settings. We recommend that all measures be adapted to the circumstances and availability of personal protective equipment at each centre and also highlight the need to periodically update recommendations as we may need to readopt more restrictive measures depending on the local epidemiology of the virus. These guidelines are designed to avoid the transmission of SARS-CoV-2 among both patients and healthcare staff as we gradually return to normal medical practice, to prevent postoperative complications and try to reduce possible deficiencies in the diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the ophthalmic diseases. With this update (5th ) the Spanish Society of Ophthalmology is placed as one of the major ophthalmology societies providing periodic and systematized recommendations for ophthalmic care during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/transmission , Communicable Disease Control/methods , Ophthalmology/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , COVID-19/epidemiology , Consensus , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Pandemics/prevention & control , Practice Guidelines as Topic , SARS-CoV-2 , Spain , Telemedicine/methods
5.
Arch Soc Esp Oftalmol (Engl Ed) ; 95(12): 586-590, 2020 Dec.
Article in English, Spanish | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-915625

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: To report a pilot experience of telemedicine in ophthalmology in open-care modality (i.e. direct video call), in a confinement period due to the COVID-19 pandemic. METHODS: Descriptive study of the demographic and clinical characteristics of patients attended in a 10-week confinement period. Reported satisfaction of the participating patients and doctors was evaluated through an online survey. RESULTS: In the 10-week period, 291 ophthalmologic telemedicine consultations were performed. The main reasons for consultation were inflammatory conditions of the ocular surface and eyelids (79.4%), followed by administrative requirements (6.5%), non-inflammatory conditions of the ocular surface (5.2%), strabismus suspicion (3.4%) and vitreo-retinal symptoms (3.1%). According to previously defined criteria, 22 patients (7.5%) were referred to immediate face-to-face consultation. The level of satisfaction was high, both in doctors (100%) and in patients (93.4%). CONCLUSIONS: Open-care modality of telemedicine in ophthalmology during the pandemic period is a useful instrument to filter potential face-to-face consultations, either elective or emergency, and potentially reduce the risk of COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/statistics & numerical data , Pandemics , Quarantine , SARS-CoV-2 , Telemedicine/statistics & numerical data , Adolescent , Adult , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Child , Child, Preschool , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/drug therapy , Female , Humans , Infant , Infant, Newborn , Male , Middle Aged , Ophthalmology/standards , Ophthalmology/trends , Patient Satisfaction , Pilot Projects , Practice Guidelines as Topic , Referral and Consultation/statistics & numerical data , Surveys and Questionnaires , Telemedicine/standards , Telemedicine/trends , Time Factors , Young Adult
7.
Curr Opin Ophthalmol ; 31(5): 435-446, 2020 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-707298

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE OF REVIEW: The use of nonpharmaceutical interventions can prevent viral spread in COVID-19 pandemic and PPE forms a crucial part of this strategy. However, there are discrepancies in existing guidelines and a lack of consensus among ophthalmic communities. This review aims to identify general consensus and provides recommendation of PPE for most common ophthalmological scenarios. With a global shortage of PPE, extended use and reuse strategies are also discussed. RECENT FINDINGS: In this review, guidelines and resources were selected, based on a three-tier process. The first-tier resources were from international infection control organizations. The second-tier resources were from ophthalmological professional associations and colleges. The third-tier resources involved a PubMed search using the keywords 'COVID-19; coronavirus; personal protective equipment' performed on 1 May 2020. Non-English guidelines and literatures were excluded. SUMMARY: On the basis of our methodology, we included a total of 30 documents, including 5 resources from tier 1, 14 resources from tier 2 and 15 from tier 3. Different levels of protection are necessary. Whenever performing an aerosol generating procedure, maximum protection should be ensured, this includes FFP3 respirator, fluid resistant gown, goggles or face-shield and disposable gloves. Similar protection should be used for handling COVID-19-positive/suspected case but the use of FFP2 respirator is acceptable. During routine outpatient clinic in cases of negative triage, it is recommended to use ASTM III surgical mask, plastic apron, disposable gloves and eye protection with goggles or face-shield. Lastly, patients should be encouraged to wear surgical masks whenever possible.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Ophthalmology/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Practice Guidelines as Topic/standards , COVID-19 , Humans , Infection Control/methods , Infection Control/standards , Internationality , Pandemics/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2
9.
Acta Med Port ; 33(9): 593-600, 2020 Sep 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-647035

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: COVID-19 is caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2. Ocular manifestations have been reported including conjunctivitis and retinal changes. Therefore, it is of the utmost importance to clarify eye involvement in COVID-19 in order to help with its diagnosis and to further prevent its transmission. The purpose of this review is to describe the structure and transmission of SARS-CoV-2, reported ocular findings and protection strategies for ophthalmologists. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Literature search on PubMed for relevant articles using the keywords 'COVID-19', 'coronavirus', and 'SARS-CoV-2' in conjunction with 'ophthalmology' and 'eye'. Moreover, official recommendations of ophthalmological societies were reviewed. RESULTS: Although the conjunctiva is directly exposed to extraocular pathogens, and the mucosa of the ocular surface and upper respiratory tract are connected by the nasolacrimal duct, the eye is rarely involved in human SARS-CoV-2 infection and the SARS-CoV-2 RNA positive rate by RT-PCR test in tears and conjunctival secretions from patients with COVID-19 is also extremely low. DISCUSSION: The eye can be affected by SARS-CoV-2, which is supported by some reports of conjunctivitis and retinal changes, but its role in the spread of the disease is still unknown. CONCLUSION: Given the current scarce evidence, more research is needed to clarify the relationship between SARS-CoV-2 and the eye.


Introdução: COVID-19 é o nome atribuído à doença causada pelo novo coronavírus - SARS-CoV-2. Esta infeção rapidamente atingiu uma disseminação mundial, face ao aumento da globalização e adaptação do vírus a ambientes distintos. Foram descritas manifestações oftalmológicas em doentes com COVID-19, nomeadamente, conjuntivite e alterações retinianas. Assim, é fundamental esclarecer o envolvimento ocular na COVID-19, contribuindo para o seu diagnóstico precoce e limitando a sua transmissão. O objetivo desta revisão é descrever a estrutura e o modo de transmissão do SARS-CoV-2, assim como manifestações oculares reportadas e estratégias de proteção para oftalmologistas. Material e Métodos: Revisão dos artigos relevantes publicados na PubMed usando as palavras-chave 'COVID-19', 'coronavirus' e 'SARS-CoV-2' em associação com as palavras 'ophthalmology' e 'eye'. Além disso, foi feita uma revisão das recomendações oficiais de várias sociedades oftalmológicas a nível mundial. Resultados: Apesar da conjuntiva estar diretamente exposta a patógenos exógenos, e da mucosa da superfície ocular e do trato respiratório superior estarem conectados pelo canal nasolacrimal, o olho raramente parece ser afetado pelo SARS-CoV-2. A infeção por SARS-CoV-2 e a taxa de positividade para a pesquisa do RNA do SARS-CoV-2 pelo teste de RT-PCR em lágrimas e secreções conjuntivais de pacientes com COVID-19 também são extremamente baixas. Discussão: O olho pode ser afetado pelo SARS-CoV-2, dada a descrição de casos de conjuntivite e alterações retinianas, mas o seu papel na disseminação da doença ainda é desconhecido. Conclusão: Dada a escassa evidência atual, são necessários mais estudos para esclarecer a relação entre o SARS-CoV-2 e o globo ocular.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Conjunctiva/virology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Ophthalmology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Aged , Antiviral Agents/therapeutic use , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/ultrastructure , COVID-19 , Chloroquine/therapeutic use , Conjunctivitis, Viral/virology , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disinfection/standards , Equipment Safety , Female , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Male , Masks , Middle Aged , Personal Protective Equipment , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , RNA, Viral/isolation & purification , Receptor, Angiotensin, Type 2 , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1306-1311, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615747

ABSTRACT

The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (COVID-19) pandemic has disrupted our society on an unprecedented scale since its inception in December 2019. As the health-care system is finally re-organizing to mitigate the impact of the pandemic, it was necessary to re-structure primary eye care (PEC) activities as well on the same lines. A consensus meeting was held with leading eye-care experts on 2nd May 2020 to prepare a roadmap for PEC in the days to come. Guidelines are needed for PEC activities like vision testing, refraction, optical dispensing, counseling, etc., Some of the activities at vision centers (VCs) may be postponed or modified in light of the current pandemic situation. PEC workers need to strictly follow social distancing norms (minimum 3 feet) for minimizing risk of exposure and need access to appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE), like gloves, masks and shields while examining beneficiaries. For optometrists, sterilization of instruments and encouraging the people to remain silent during the examination is recommended. Because conjunctivitis may be an early sign which can present at VCs, extra precautions in the form of PPE has to be ensured while examining such patients. This is also an opportunity to start running telemedicine clinics for all emergent cases that cannot be managed at the primary level. The guidelines also need to be updated based on the context of the working environment and changes in government directives from time to time.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Management , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Vision Disorders/diagnosis , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , India/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Public Health , SARS-CoV-2 , Vision Disorders/therapy
11.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1277-1280, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615746

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 pandemic has threatened the humanity at a global level to a large extent by the burden of the disease with significant mortality and to a certain extent as a byproduct of the necessary efforts to contain the same. There is a significant impact on the health care system, as we not only have to contain pandemic, but continue to treat our non-COVID-19 patients in a safe and responsible manner. Ophthalmology practice in general and glaucoma in particular needs certain modifications and additional precautions while examining as well as managing these patients keeping their and our safety in mind. As the lockdown relaxations are in vogue we need to learn how to deal with our regular patients as well in addition to emergency care. This paper presents the consensus-based guidelines by an expert panel on how to restart glaucoma practice during this COVID-19 time. These guidelines will be applicable across the country and should help ophthalmologists and glaucoma specialist to restart their practices while safeguarding the patients and their own selves from getting infected.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Glaucoma/therapy , Ophthalmology/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Management , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1263-1268, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615739

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus pandemic has strained the healthcare system with mortality and morbidity. A number of elective surgeries have come to standstill due to lockdown and movement restrictions. Refractive surgery being a purely elective procedure and quite a fresh subset of ophthalmology, there is a lack of unanimity as to what precautions should be followed to resume the practice of same. This article attempts to highlight simple guidelines in accordance with an expert panel, which can be followed by all those involved directly or indirectly in refractive surgery services while addressing safety of doctors, supporting staff as well as patients as a primary concern.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Ophthalmology/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Refractive Surgical Procedures/standards , Societies, Medical , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , India , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
13.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1300-1305, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615733

ABSTRACT

The COVID-19 Pandemic has prompted substantial changes in the way ophthalmology is practiced globally. General guidelines on safe ophthalmic practice have been issued by various bodies across the globe including the All India Ophthalmological Society. While these are suitable to ophthalmology overall, they are not entirely suitable to a subspecialty practice, particularly pediatric ophthalmology, strabismus and neuro-ophthalmology, which entails dealing with children, surgery under general anesthesia and managing possible life threatening situations. A group of sub-specialists and anesthetists met virtually and arrived at a consensus with regard to practice and general anesthesia protocols pertaining to these subspecialties of ophthalmology. The recommendations made by the expert group are specific yet can be universally followed to ensure the best and safest outcome for the practitioner and patient alike. The recommendations pertain to listing conditions which need emergency or urgent care in the fields of pediatric ophthalmology and neuro-ophthalmology, precautions and technique of pediatric and neuro-ophthalmic eye examination and a protocol for delivering a safe general anesthesia for a pediatriceye surgery.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Neurology/standards , Ophthalmology/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Societies, Medical , Strabismus/therapy , COVID-19 , Child , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Disease Management , Humans , India , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1281-1291, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615723

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of rapidly spreading COVID-19 pandemic in December 2019 has witnessed a major transformation in the health care system worldwide. This has led to the re-organization of the specialty services for the effective utilization of available resources and ensuring the safety of patients and healthcare workers. Suspension of oncology services will have major implications on cancer care due to delayed diagnosis and treatment leading to irreversible adverse consequences. Therefore various oncology organizations have called for a continuation of cancer care during this crisis with diligence. The COVID-19 pandemic has forced the clinicians to transform the components of care from screening to outpatient care and primary management. The purpose of this article is to establish guidelines and recommendations for ocular oncology in the management of ocular tumors set by a multidisciplinary team of experts including ocular, medical and radiation oncologists, and pathologists. As the pandemic is evolving fast, it will require constant updates and reformation of health strategies and guidelines for safe and quality health care.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Eye Neoplasms/therapy , Medical Oncology/standards , Ophthalmology/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Consensus , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
16.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1316-1327, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615718

ABSTRACT

While telemedicine has been around for a few decades, it has taken great importance and prominence in recent times. With the fear of the virus being transmitted, patients and physicians across specialties are using consultation via a telephone call or video from the safety of their homes. Though tele-ophthalmology has been popular for screening, there are no clear guidelines on how to comprehensively manage patients seeking advice and treatment for a particular eye condition. Some major barriers to diagnosis and management are compromised detailed examination, no measurement of the visual acuity or intraocular pressure and a retinal evaluation not being feasible. Despite these limitations, we do need to help those patients who need immediate care or attention. Hence, this article has put together some guidelines to follow during such consultations. They are important and timely due to the medicolegal and financial implications.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Disease Transmission, Infectious/prevention & control , Eye Diseases/therapy , Mass Screening/standards , Ophthalmology/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Remote Consultation/standards , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Humans , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 68(7): 1292-1299, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-615707

ABSTRACT

The aim of this review was to propose multi-pronged resumption strategies for lacrimal practice in an effort to plan a sustainable recommencement of elective surgeries after we emerge from the peak of COVID-19 pandemic. The strategies for lacrimal practice were classified into 7 subtypes, and each of the blueprints were reassessed based on existing information on resumption strategies of elective surgeries from other specialties in COVID-19 era. The specific needs of lacrimal practice were then added to construct algorithms summarizing the resumption strategies. The basic principle of 'primum non nocere' needs to be followed. The overall proposed plan advocates the transition to a more sustainable health care reality in a world where we would still co-exist with COVID-19. A comprehensive effort involving screening, laboratory testing, appropriate triage, effective personal protection and specific precautionary measures for lacrimal clinics and operating room are needed to be able to safely resume elective surgery when the pandemic peak declines. To predict the timing of the resumption of elective surgeries is quite complex and influenced by several geographic, political and economic factors. It is equally important to remember that COVID-19 crisis is a dynamic situation and constantly evolving, hence the strategies provided are subject to change. Strict adherence to standard COVID-19 guidelines combined with effective testing and personal protection strategies can ensure slow yet smooth and safe return to full lacrimal practice after the COVID-19 pandemic calms down. The local government directives, individual and institutional discretion are advised.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Lacrimal Apparatus Diseases/therapy , Ophthalmology/standards , Pandemics , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
18.
J Pak Med Assoc ; 70(Suppl 3)(5): S95-S97, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-609386

ABSTRACT

Ophthalmologists are among those healers facing a higher risk of acquiring novel coronavirus disease 2019, called COVID-19, during their professional duties since they have close physical contact with their patients. Some patients with COVID-19 may present with or may develop conjunctivitis during the course of the illness. The ocular secretions and tears have been identified to have positive results to COVID-19 tests and as such could be a source of spread. This review aims at providing the useful guidelines to ophthalmic professionals for their own safety, and safety of their patients based on the available current literature, and also based on personal experience and observations. Literature search was made on PubMed for COVID-19 in relation to ophthalmology in the limited period of the last quarter of 2019 and first quarter of 2020. Research also included access to current guidelines published by various ophthalmic societies. Accordingly, present and future ophthalmic practice patterns need to be modified.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections , Infectious Disease Transmission, Patient-to-Professional/prevention & control , Ophthalmologists , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral , COVID-19 , China , Conjunctivitis, Viral/diagnosis , Conjunctivitis, Viral/etiology , Conjunctivitis, Viral/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Humans , Ophthalmology/standards , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Medwave ; 20(4): e7902, 2020 May 13.
Article in Spanish, English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-431949

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: A new type of coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) causes a respiratory distress syndrome that has been called COVID-19 and has generated an unprecedented pandemic. Serious complications include pneumonia, and mortality ranges from 2 to 5%. Until March 26, the World Health Organization reports 462 684 confirmed cases and 20 834 deaths worldwide. Dissemination occurs from aerosols or respiratory droplets. Different scientific societies have published clinical practice guidelines regarding ophthalmic care in the COVID-19 pandemic, but the information is presented inconsistently, which makes decision-making difficult. METHODS: We conducted a sensitive bibliographic search in EMBASE and ophthalmic society webpages, of the clinical practice guidelines of ophthalmic care in pandemic COVID-19. We extracted the recommendations, organizing them into three categories: "Which patients to attend", "How should the clinic work", and "What interventions should be avoided". For each guideline, we assessed whether the search was systematic and whether the Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation (GRADE) methodology was followed. RESULTS: Fourteen relevant articles were found. Fifty-one recommendations were extracted and are shown in a summary table. None are based on a systematic search for evidence, nor do any use GRADE to develop the recommendations. CONCLUSIONS: The clinical practice guidelines that we reviewed all recommend rescheduling all non-urgent consultations and surgeries, reinforcing contact precautions, the use of personal protection elements, and the disinfection of surfaces and instruments. The guidelines should be improved by incorporating systematic searches for evidence, using GRADE for recommendations, and Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) for reporting.


INTRODUCCIÓN: Un nuevo tipo de coronavirus, denominado SARS­CoV-2, puede provocar patología respiratoria, denominada COVID-19, y ha generado una pandemia sin precedentes. Las complicaciones graves incluyen neumonía y la mortalidad oscila entre un 2 a un 5%. Hasta el 26 de marzo de 2020 la OMS informó 462 684 casos confirmados, y 20 834 muertes en todo el mundo. Se transmite por aerosoles o gotitas respiratorias. Distintas sociedades científicas han publicado guías de práctica clínica respecto a la atención oftalmológica en pandemia COVID-19. Cada una expone la información de manera diferente, lo que dificulta la toma de decisiones. MÉTODOS: Realizamos una búsqueda bibliográfica sensible en EMBASE y dirigida en sociedades oftalmológicas de guías de práctica clínica de atención oftalmológica en pandemia COVID-19. Extrajimos las recomendaciones, organizándolas en tres categorías: "qué pacientes tratar", "funcionamiento del policlínico y consulta" y "qué intervenciones evitar". En cada una se evaluó la búsqueda sistemática de evidencia y el uso en las recomendaciones de metodología Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation, GRADE. RESULTADOS: Se encontraron 14 artículos relevantes. Se extrajeron 51 recomendaciones, elaborando una tabla resumen. Ninguna efectuó búsqueda sistemática de evidencia, ni incorporó GRADE en las recomendaciones. CONCLUSIONES: Las guías de práctica clínica revisadas comparten los principios generales de reprogramar toda consulta y cirugía no urgente, reforzando las precauciones de contacto, el uso de elementos de protección personal y desinfección de superficies e instrumentos. Se deben mejorar las guías de práctica clínica incorporando búsquedas sistemáticas de evidencia, usando metodología GRADE para las recomendaciones y Appraisal of Guidelines for Research and Evaluation (AGREE II) para el reporte.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/standards , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Practice Guidelines as Topic , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/complications , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Diagnostic Techniques, Ophthalmological/standards , Equipment Contamination , Humans , Ophthalmology/methods , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , SARS-CoV-2 , Sterilization/methods
20.
Eur J Ophthalmol ; 30(4): 621-628, 2020 Jul.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-291469

ABSTRACT

INTRODUCTION: The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2) is infecting people and spreading easily from person-to-person. Cases have been detected in most countries worldwide. Italy is one of the most affected countries as of 30 March 2020. Public health response includes a rapid reorganization of the Italian National Healthcare System in order to reduce transmission of COVID-19 within hospitals and healthcare facilities, while optimizing the assistance to patients with severe COVID-19 complications. METHODS: We analysed the actions that were taken in three ophthalmology centres in northern Italy during the SARS-CoV-2 outbreak and how these measures affected patient's attendance. In addition, due to the rapidly evolving scenario, we reviewed the evidence available during the course of this pandemic. RESULTS: A full reorganization of ophthalmology services is mandatory according to current existing infection containment measures in order to continue dispensing urgent procedures without endangering the community with amplification of the diffusion chain. Ophthalmologists are considered at elevated risk of exposure when caring patients and vice versa, due to their close proximity during eye examination. High volumes of procedures typically generated by ophthalmologists with concurrent implications on the risk of infection are considered when re-assessing healthcare facilities reorganization. CONCLUSION: Containment measures in the event of pandemic due to infective agents should be well known by healthcare professionals and promptly applied in order to mitigate the risk of nosocomial transmission and outbreak.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/prevention & control , Cross Infection/prevention & control , Ophthalmology/organization & administration , Pandemics/prevention & control , Pneumonia, Viral/prevention & control , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Cross Infection/transmission , Eye Diseases/diagnosis , Eye Diseases/therapy , Humans , Infection Control/organization & administration , Italy/epidemiology , Ophthalmology/standards , Personal Protective Equipment/standards , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , SARS-CoV-2 , Triage/organization & administration
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