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2.
Mol Biol Rep ; 49(1): 747-754, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1491296

ABSTRACT

COVID-19-associated-mucormycosis, commonly referred to as the "Black Fungus," is a rare secondary fungal infection in COVID-19 patients prompted by a group of mucor molds. Association of this rare fungal infection with SARS-CoV-2 infection has been declared as an endemic in India, with minor cases in several other countries around the globe. Although the fungal infection is not contagious like the viral infection, the causative fungal agent is omnipresent. Infection displays an overall mortality rate of around 50%, with many other secondary side effects posing a potential threat in exacerbating COVID-19 mortality rates. In this review, we have accessed the role of free iron availability in COVID-19 patients that might correlate to the pathogenesis of the causative fungal agent. Besides, we have analyzed the negative consequences of using immunosuppressive drugs in encouraging this opportunistic fungal infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Hyperferritinemia , Mucormycosis , Fungi/isolation & purification , Fungi/pathogenicity , Humans , Hyperferritinemia/complications , Hyperferritinemia/microbiology , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , India/epidemiology , Iron/metabolism , Mortality , Mucormycosis/epidemiology , Mucormycosis/etiology , Mucormycosis/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Rhizopus oryzae/isolation & purification , Rhizopus oryzae/pathogenicity
3.
Pan Afr Med J ; 39: 275, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1485483

ABSTRACT

Fungal osteomyelitis is a life-threatening and seldom seen opportunistic infection. It is commonly an affectation of the nose and paranasal sinuses within the orofacial region. It is an aggressive infection that needs to be addressed promptly to prevent fatal consequences. The mode of infection is via the inhalation route and infection begins initially in the nose and paranasal sinuses with subsequent invasion into the vascular tissue, eventually leading to thrombosis and necrosis of nearby hard and soft tissues. Here, we report a case of a 31-year-old male who presented with pain over the upper jaw that was sudden in onset, continuous, dull aching, radiating towards forehead and neck of the left side, aggravates on mastication and relives on its own. He had a history of uncontrolled diabetes mellitus. On further investigation, using diagnostic and Interventional aids, a final diagnosis of mucormycotic osteomyelitis of the maxilla was made.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Maxillary Diseases/diagnosis , Mucormycosis/diagnosis , Osteomyelitis/diagnosis , Adult , Diabetes Mellitus/physiopathology , Humans , Male , Maxillary Diseases/microbiology , Maxillary Diseases/pathology , Mucormycosis/pathology , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/pathology , Osteomyelitis/microbiology , Osteomyelitis/pathology
4.
Microb Drug Resist ; 27(9): 1167-1175, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406451

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the drivers of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection development in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its impact on patient outcome. Methods: Retrospective analysis on data from 32 consecutive patients with COVID-19, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) from March to May 2020. Outcomes considered were MDR infection and ICU mortality. Results: Fifty percent of patients developed an MDR infection during ICU stay after a median time of 8 [4-11] days. Most common MDR pathogens were carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii, causing bloodstream infections and pneumonia. MDR infections were linked to a higher length of ICU stay (p = 0.002), steroid therapy (p = 0.011), and associated with a lower ICU mortality (odds ratio: 0.439, 95% confidence interval: 0.251-0.763; p < 0.001). Low-dose aspirin intake was associated with both MDR infection (p = 0.043) and survival (p = 0.015). Among MDR patients, mortality was related with piperacillin-tazobactam use (p = 0.035) and an earlier onset of MDR infection (p = 0.042). Conclusions: MDR infections were a common complication in critically ill COVID-19 patients at our center. MDR risk was higher among those dwelling longer in the ICU and receiving steroids. However, MDR infections were not associated with a worse outcome.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Klebsiella Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter Infections/virology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Acinetobacter baumannii/growth & development , Acinetobacter baumannii/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Carbapenems/therapeutic use , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella Infections/virology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/growth & development , Klebsiella pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Steroids/therapeutic use , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
6.
Indian J Pharmacol ; 53(4): 317-327, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1367964

ABSTRACT

Since the onset of COVID-19 pandemic, parallel opportunistic infections have also been emerging as another disease spectrum. Among all these opportunistic infection, mucormycosis has become a matter of concern with its rapid increase of cases with rapid spread as compared to pre-COVID-19 era. Cases have been reported in post-COVID-19-related immune suppression along with the presence of comorbidity which adds on the deadly outcome. There is no systematic review addressing the issue of COVID-19-associated mucormycosis. This is the first systematic review of published studies of mucormycosis associated with COVID-19. The aim was to analyze the real scenario of the disease statement including all the published studies from first November 2019 to 30th June to analyze the contemporary epidemiology, clinical manifestations, risk factor, prognosis, and treatment outcome of COVID-19 associated rhino-orbito-cerebral-mucormycosis. A comprehensive literature search was done in following databases, namely, PubMed, Google Scholar, Scopus, and EMBASE using keywords mucormycosis, rhino orbital cerebral mucormycosis, COVID-19, and SARS-CoV-2 (from November 01, 2019 to June 30, 2021). Our study shows that, while corticosteroids have proved to be lifesaving in severe to critical COVID-19 patients, its indiscriminate use has come with its price of rhino-orbito-cerebral mucormycosis epidemic, especially in India especially in patients with preexisting diabetes mellitus with higher mortality. Corticosteroid use should be monitored and all COVID-19 patients should be closely evaluated/monitored for sequelae of immunosuppression following treatment.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Coinfection , Meningitis, Fungal/microbiology , Mucormycosis/microbiology , Nose Diseases/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Orbital Diseases/microbiology , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/immunology , COVID-19/mortality , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Meningitis, Fungal/drug therapy , Meningitis, Fungal/immunology , Meningitis, Fungal/mortality , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/immunology , Mucormycosis/mortality , Nose Diseases/drug therapy , Nose Diseases/immunology , Nose Diseases/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Orbital Diseases/drug therapy , Orbital Diseases/immunology , Orbital Diseases/mortality , Prognosis , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2/immunology
8.
J Mycol Med ; 31(2): 101125, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1164245

ABSTRACT

Mucormycosis is an invasive fungal infection (IFI) due to several species of saprophytic fungi, occurring in patients with underlying co-morbidities (including organ transplantation). During the ongoing Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic, there have been increasing reports of bacterial and fungal co-infections occurring in COVID-19 patients, including COVID-19 associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA). We describe a case of mucormycosis occurring after COVID-19, in an individual who received a recent heart transplant for severe heart failure. Two months after heart transplant, our patient developed upper respiratory and systemic symptoms and was diagnosed with COVID-19. He was managed with convalescent plasma therapy and supportive care. Approximately three months after COVID-19 diagnosis, he developed cutaneous mucormycosis at an old intravascular device site. He underwent extensive surgical interventions, combined with broad-spectrum antifungal therapy. Despite the aggressive therapeutic measures, he died after a prolonged hospital stay. In this case report, we also review the prior well-reported cases of mucormycosis occurring in COVID-19 patients and discuss potential mechanisms by which COVID-19 may predispose to IFIs. Similar to CAPA, mucormycosis with COVID-19 may need to be evaluated as an emerging disease association. Clinicians should be vigilant to evaluate for invasive fungal infections such as mucormycosis in patients with COVID-19 infection.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Heart Transplantation , Invasive Fungal Infections/complications , Mucormycosis/complications , Postoperative Complications/etiology , Rhizopus/isolation & purification , Aged , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Bacteremia/complications , Bacteremia/drug therapy , Bacteremia/microbiology , COVID-19/therapy , Catheter-Related Infections/drug therapy , Catheter-Related Infections/etiology , Coinfection/drug therapy , Coinfection/microbiology , Combined Modality Therapy , Contraindications, Drug , Debridement , Dermatomycoses/drug therapy , Dermatomycoses/etiology , Disease Susceptibility , Fatal Outcome , Heart Failure/surgery , Humans , Hydroxychloroquine/therapeutic use , Immunization, Passive , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Intra-Aortic Balloon Pumping/instrumentation , Invasive Fungal Infections/drug therapy , Male , Mucormycosis/drug therapy , Mucormycosis/microbiology , Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Postoperative Complications/drug therapy , Postoperative Complications/microbiology , Postoperative Complications/virology , Surgical Wound Infection/complications , Surgical Wound Infection/drug therapy , Surgical Wound Infection/microbiology , Surgical Wound Infection/surgery
9.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(4): 987-989, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1138817

ABSTRACT

A 42-year-old male patient presented with profound impairment of vision in both eyes, just as he was recovering from COVID-19. A known diabetic and hypertensive, he suffered from COVID-19 pneumonia further complicated by ARDS, septicaemia and acute kidney injury. His vision on presentation was finger counting close to face bilaterally with multiple, yellowish lesions at the posterior pole. Based on the clinical findings and previous blood culture report, it was diagnosed as candida retinitis and treated with oral and intravitreal anti-fungals. The lesions were regressing at follow-up. This is a post COVID-19 presumed candida retinitis case report.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/diagnosis , Candidiasis/diagnosis , Eye Infections, Fungal/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Retinitis/diagnosis , SARS-CoV-2 , Administration, Oral , Adult , Antifungal Agents/therapeutic use , Candidiasis/drug therapy , Candidiasis/microbiology , Eye Infections, Fungal/drug therapy , Eye Infections, Fungal/microbiology , Fluconazole/therapeutic use , Humans , Intravitreal Injections , Male , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Retinitis/drug therapy , Retinitis/microbiology , Tomography, Optical Coherence , Visual Acuity/physiology , Voriconazole/therapeutic use
10.
Mycoses ; 64(2): 144-151, 2021 Feb.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-939797

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: As the global coronavirus pandemic (COVID-19) spreads across the world, new clinical challenges emerge in the hospital landscape. Among these challenges, the increased risk of coinfections is a major threat to the patients. Although still in a low number, due to the short time of the pandemic, studies that identified a significant number of hospitalised patients with COVID-19 who developed secondary fungal infections that led to serious complications and even death have been published. OBJECTIVES: In this scenario, we aim to determine the prevalence of invasive fungal infections (IFIs) and describe possible associated risk factors in patients admitted due to severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) infection. PATIENTS/METHODS: We designed an open prospective observational study at the Rey Juan Carlos University Hospital (Mostoles, Spain), during the period from February 1 to April 30, 2020. RESULTS: In this article, we reported seven patients with COVID-19-associated pulmonary aspergillosis (CAPA) who had a poor prognosis. Severely ill patients represent a high-risk group; therefore, we must actively investigate the possibility of aspergillosis in all of these patients. Larger cohort studies are needed to unravel the role of COVID-19 immunosuppressive therapy as a risk factor for aspergillosis. CONCLUSIONS: As the pandemic continues to spread across the world, further reports are needed to assess the frequency of emergent and highly resistant reemergent fungal infections during severe COVID-19. These coinfections are leading a significant number of patients with COVID-19 to death due to complications following the primary viral disease.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/etiology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Adult , Aged , Aspergillus/genetics , Aspergillus/isolation & purification , Aspergillus/physiology , COVID-19/virology , Female , Hospitalization , Humans , Intermediate Care Facilities/statistics & numerical data , Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis/microbiology , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/etiology , Prevalence , Prospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Spain
11.
Future Microbiol ; 15: 1405-1413, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-883809

ABSTRACT

As the global COVID-19 pandemic spreads worldwide, new challenges arise in the clinical landscape. The need for reliable diagnostic methods, treatments and vaccines for COVID-19 is the major worldwide urgency. While these goals are especially important, the growing risk of co-infections is a major threat not only to the health systems but also to patients' lives. Although there is still not enough published statistical data, co-infections in COVID-19 patients found that a significant number of patients hospitalized with COVID-19 developed secondary systemic mycoses that led to serious complications and even death. This review will discuss some of these important findings with the major aim to warn the population about the high risk of concomitant systemic mycoses in individuals weakened by COVID-19.


Subject(s)
Coronavirus Infections/complications , Mycoses/complications , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Pneumonia, Viral/complications , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Invasive Fungal Infections/complications , Invasive Fungal Infections/diagnosis , Invasive Fungal Infections/epidemiology , Invasive Fungal Infections/microbiology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/complications , Lung Diseases, Fungal/diagnosis , Lung Diseases, Fungal/epidemiology , Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology , Mycoses/diagnosis , Mycoses/epidemiology , Mycoses/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Risk , SARS-CoV-2
12.
Clin Microbiol Infect ; 27(1): 61-66, 2021 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-808838

ABSTRACT

SCOPE: The Dutch Working Party on Antibiotic Policy constituted a multidisciplinary expert committee to provide evidence-based recommendation for the use of antibacterial therapy in hospitalized adults with a respiratory infection and suspected or proven 2019 Coronavirus disease (COVID-19). METHODS: We performed a literature search to answer four key questions. The committee graded the evidence and developed recommendations by using Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development, and Evaluation methodology. QUESTIONS ADDRESSED BY THE GUIDELINE AND RECOMMENDATIONS: We assessed evidence on the risk of bacterial infections in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, the associated bacterial pathogens, how to diagnose bacterial infections and how to treat bacterial infections. Bacterial co-infection upon admission was reported in 3.5% of COVID-19 patients, while bacterial secondary infections during hospitalization occurred up to 15%. No or very low quality evidence was found to answer the other key clinical questions. Although the evidence base on bacterial infections in COVID-19 is currently limited, available evidence supports restrictive antibiotic use from an antibiotic stewardship perspective, especially upon admission. To support restrictive antibiotic use, maximum efforts should be undertaken to obtain sputum and blood culture samples as well as pneumococcal urinary antigen testing. We suggest to stop antibiotics in patients who started antibiotic treatment upon admission when representative cultures as well as urinary antigen tests show no signs of involvement of bacterial pathogens after 48 hours. For patients with secondary bacterial respiratory infection we recommend to follow other guideline recommendations on antibacterial treatment for patients with hospital-acquired and ventilator-associated pneumonia. An antibiotic treatment duration of five days in patients with COVID-19 and suspected bacterial respiratory infection is recommended upon improvement of signs, symptoms and inflammatory markers. Larger, prospective studies about the epidemiology of bacterial infections in COVID-19 are urgently needed to confirm our conclusions and ultimately prevent unnecessary antibiotic use during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Subject(s)
Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Bacterial Infections/drug therapy , COVID-19/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Bacterial/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Bacterial Infections/diagnosis , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Typing Techniques , Bias , Blood Culture/methods , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Coinfection , Evidence-Based Medicine , Humans , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Pneumonia, Bacterial/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Bacterial/microbiology , Sputum/microbiology
13.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1958-1964, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725886

ABSTRACT

Objectives Severe or critical COVID-19 is associated with intensive care unit admission, increased secondary infection rate, and would lead to significant worsened prognosis. Risks and characteristics relating to secondary infections in severe COVID-19 have not been described. Methods Severe and critical COVID-19 patients from Shanghai were included. We collected lower respiratory, urine, catheters, and blood samples according to clinical necessity and culture and mNGS were performed. Clinical and laboratory data were archived. Results We found 57.89% (22/38) patients developed secondary infections. The patient receiving invasive mechanical ventilation or in critical state has a higher chance of secondary infections (P<0.0001). The most common infections were respiratory, blood-stream and urinary infections, and in respiratory infections, the most detected pathogens were gram-negative bacteria (26, 50.00%), following by gram-positive bacteria (14, 26.92%), virus (6, 11.54%), fungi (4, 7.69%), and others (2, 3.85%). Respiratory Infection rate post high flow, tracheal intubation, and tracheotomy were 12.90% (4/31), 30.43% (7/23), and 92.31% (12/13) respectively. Secondary infections would lead to lower discharge rate and higher mortality rate. Conclusion Our study originally illustrated secondary infection proportion in severe and critical COVID-19 patients. Culture accompanied with metagenomics sequencing increased pathogen diagnostic rate. Secondary infections risks increased after receiving invasive respiratory ventilations and intravascular devices, and would lead to a lower discharge rate and a higher mortality rate.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia/pathology , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Fungemia/pathology , Mycoses/pathology , Opportunistic Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Urinary Tract Infections/pathology , Aged , Bacteremia/microbiology , Bacteremia/mortality , Bacteremia/virology , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/mortality , Bacterial Infections/virology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/microbiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Fungemia/microbiology , Fungemia/mortality , Fungemia/virology , Fungi/pathogenicity , Gram-Negative Bacteria/pathogenicity , Gram-Positive Bacteria/pathogenicity , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/microbiology , Mycoses/mortality , Mycoses/virology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/microbiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology , Urinary Tract Infections/mortality , Urinary Tract Infections/virology
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