Your browser doesn't support javascript.
Show: 20 | 50 | 100
Results 1 - 17 de 17
Filter
1.
Pol J Microbiol ; 70(3): 395-400, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1441451

ABSTRACT

Opportunistic fungal infections increase morbidity and mortality in COVID-19 patients monitored in intensive care units (ICU). As patients' hospitalization days in the ICU and intubation period increase, opportunistic infections also increase, which prolongs hospital stay days and elevates costs. The study aimed to describe the profile of fungal infections and identify the risk factors associated with mortality in COVID-19 intensive care patients. The records of 627 patients hospitalized in ICU with the diagnosis of COVID-19 were investigated from electronic health records and hospitalization files. The demographic characteristics (age, gender), the number of ICU hospitalization days and mortality rates, APACHE II scores, accompanying diseases, antibiotic-steroid treatments taken during hospitalization, and microbiological results (blood, urine, tracheal aspirate samples) of the patients were recorded. Opportunistic fungal infection was detected in 32 patients (5.10%) of 627 patients monitored in ICU with a COVID-19 diagnosis. The average APACHE II score of the patients was 28 ± 6. While 25 of the patients (78.12%) died, seven (21.87%) were discharged from the ICU. Candida parapsilosis (43.7%) was the opportunistic fungal agent isolated from most blood samples taken from COVID-19 positive patients. The mortality rate of COVID-19 positive patients with candidemia was 80%. While two out of the three patients (66.6%) for whom fungi were grown from their tracheal aspirate died, one patient (33.3%) was transferred to the ward. Opportunistic fungal infections increase the mortality rate of COVID-19-positive patients. In addition to the risk factors that we cannot change, invasive procedures should be avoided, constant blood sugar regulation should be applied, and unnecessary antibiotics use should be avoided.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , COVID-19/microbiology , Fungi/pathogenicity , Intensive Care Units/statistics & numerical data , Mycoses/etiology , Mycoses/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/etiology , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Cross Infection , Female , Fungi/classification , Fungi/isolation & purification , Humans , Length of Stay , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/blood , Mycoses/virology , Opportunistic Infections/blood , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Risk Factors
2.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 121-124, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436206

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is especially severe in patients with underlying chronic conditions, with increased risk of mortality. There is concern that people living with HIV (PLWH), especially those with severe immunosuppression, and COVID-19 may have severe disease and a negative clinical outcome. Most studies on COVID-19 in PLWH are from Asia, Europe and America where population dynamics, antiretroviral treatment coverage and coexisting opportunistic infections may differ from that in sub-Saharan Africa. We report on the clinical profile and outcome of three cases of PLWH co-infected with SARS-CoV-2. They all presented with fever, cough and breathlessness and also had advanced HIV infection as evidenced by opportunistic infections, high HIV viral loads and low CD4 counts. The patients responded favourably to the standard of care and were discharged home. Our findings suggest that PLWH with advanced immunosuppression may not necessarily have an unfavourable disease course and outcome. However, case-controlled studies with a larger population size are needed to better understand the impact of COVID-19 in this patient population. FUNDING: Not declared.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/virology , Coinfection/virology , HIV Infections/virology , HIV , Opportunistic Infections/virology , SARS-CoV-2 , Adult , Africa South of the Sahara , COVID-19/complications , Coinfection/complications , Female , HIV Infections/complications , Humans , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/complications , Viral Load
3.
Microb Drug Resist ; 27(9): 1167-1175, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1406451

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study was to assess the drivers of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial infection development in coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and its impact on patient outcome. Methods: Retrospective analysis on data from 32 consecutive patients with COVID-19, admitted to our intensive care unit (ICU) from March to May 2020. Outcomes considered were MDR infection and ICU mortality. Results: Fifty percent of patients developed an MDR infection during ICU stay after a median time of 8 [4-11] days. Most common MDR pathogens were carbapenem-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae and Acinetobacter baumannii, causing bloodstream infections and pneumonia. MDR infections were linked to a higher length of ICU stay (p = 0.002), steroid therapy (p = 0.011), and associated with a lower ICU mortality (odds ratio: 0.439, 95% confidence interval: 0.251-0.763; p < 0.001). Low-dose aspirin intake was associated with both MDR infection (p = 0.043) and survival (p = 0.015). Among MDR patients, mortality was related with piperacillin-tazobactam use (p = 0.035) and an earlier onset of MDR infection (p = 0.042). Conclusions: MDR infections were a common complication in critically ill COVID-19 patients at our center. MDR risk was higher among those dwelling longer in the ICU and receiving steroids. However, MDR infections were not associated with a worse outcome.


Subject(s)
Acinetobacter Infections/mortality , COVID-19/mortality , Drug Resistance, Multiple, Bacterial , Klebsiella Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Pneumonia/mortality , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Acinetobacter Infections/drug therapy , Acinetobacter Infections/microbiology , Acinetobacter Infections/virology , Acinetobacter baumannii/drug effects , Acinetobacter baumannii/growth & development , Acinetobacter baumannii/pathogenicity , Adult , Aged , Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use , Aspirin/therapeutic use , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/microbiology , COVID-19/virology , Carbapenems/therapeutic use , Critical Illness , Female , Hospital Mortality , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Klebsiella Infections/drug therapy , Klebsiella Infections/microbiology , Klebsiella Infections/virology , Klebsiella pneumoniae/drug effects , Klebsiella pneumoniae/growth & development , Klebsiella pneumoniae/pathogenicity , Length of Stay/statistics & numerical data , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Piperacillin, Tazobactam Drug Combination/therapeutic use , Pneumonia/drug therapy , Pneumonia/microbiology , Pneumonia/virology , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , SARS-CoV-2/physiology , Steroids/therapeutic use , Survival Analysis , Treatment Outcome
4.
EBioMedicine ; 68: 103428, 2021 Jun.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1272387

ABSTRACT

The Conference on Retroviruses and Opportunistic Infections (CROI) for 2021 was, as with so many other conferences in the past 12 months, held online. CROI provided a forum for basic scientists and clinical researchers to bring together and discuss their work on human retroviruses and associated diseases, with HIV and SARS-CoV-2 being the two viruses most covered this year. Below are some examples of the work presented at the conference, highlighting both the innovative approaches to understanding and treating viral infections but also the breadth of topics covered.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/drug therapy , HIV Infections/drug therapy , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Clinical Trials as Topic , Comorbidity , Humans , Internet-Based Intervention , Nursing Homes , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Therapies, Investigational
6.
Emerg Microbes Infect ; 9(1): 1958-1964, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-725886

ABSTRACT

Objectives Severe or critical COVID-19 is associated with intensive care unit admission, increased secondary infection rate, and would lead to significant worsened prognosis. Risks and characteristics relating to secondary infections in severe COVID-19 have not been described. Methods Severe and critical COVID-19 patients from Shanghai were included. We collected lower respiratory, urine, catheters, and blood samples according to clinical necessity and culture and mNGS were performed. Clinical and laboratory data were archived. Results We found 57.89% (22/38) patients developed secondary infections. The patient receiving invasive mechanical ventilation or in critical state has a higher chance of secondary infections (P<0.0001). The most common infections were respiratory, blood-stream and urinary infections, and in respiratory infections, the most detected pathogens were gram-negative bacteria (26, 50.00%), following by gram-positive bacteria (14, 26.92%), virus (6, 11.54%), fungi (4, 7.69%), and others (2, 3.85%). Respiratory Infection rate post high flow, tracheal intubation, and tracheotomy were 12.90% (4/31), 30.43% (7/23), and 92.31% (12/13) respectively. Secondary infections would lead to lower discharge rate and higher mortality rate. Conclusion Our study originally illustrated secondary infection proportion in severe and critical COVID-19 patients. Culture accompanied with metagenomics sequencing increased pathogen diagnostic rate. Secondary infections risks increased after receiving invasive respiratory ventilations and intravascular devices, and would lead to a lower discharge rate and a higher mortality rate.


Subject(s)
Bacteremia/pathology , Bacterial Infections/pathology , Coronavirus Infections/pathology , Fungemia/pathology , Mycoses/pathology , Opportunistic Infections/pathology , Pneumonia, Viral/pathology , Respiratory Tract Infections/pathology , Urinary Tract Infections/pathology , Aged , Bacteremia/microbiology , Bacteremia/mortality , Bacteremia/virology , Bacterial Infections/microbiology , Bacterial Infections/mortality , Bacterial Infections/virology , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/microbiology , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Critical Illness , Female , Fungemia/microbiology , Fungemia/mortality , Fungemia/virology , Fungi/pathogenicity , Gram-Negative Bacteria/pathogenicity , Gram-Positive Bacteria/pathogenicity , Humans , Intensive Care Units , Lung/microbiology , Lung/pathology , Lung/virology , Male , Middle Aged , Mycoses/microbiology , Mycoses/mortality , Mycoses/virology , Opportunistic Infections/microbiology , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/microbiology , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Respiration, Artificial/adverse effects , Respiratory Tract Infections/microbiology , Respiratory Tract Infections/mortality , Respiratory Tract Infections/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Survival Analysis , Urinary Tract Infections/microbiology , Urinary Tract Infections/mortality , Urinary Tract Infections/virology
9.
Int J Oncol ; 57(2): 533-539, 2020 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-667782

ABSTRACT

Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus­2 (SARS­CoV2) is the cause of a new disease (COVID­19) which has evolved into a pandemic during the first half of 2020. Older age, male sex and certain underlying diseases, including cancer, appear to significantly increase the risk for severe COVID­19. SARS­CoV­2 infection of host cells is facilitated by the angiotensin­converting enzyme 2 (ACE­2), and by transmembrane protease serine 2 (TMPRSS2) and other host cell proteases such as cathepsin L (CTSL). With the exception of ACE­2, a systematic analysis of these two other SARS­CoV2 infection mediators in malignancies is lacking. Here, we analysed genetic alteration, RNA expression, and DNA methylation of TMPRSS2 and CTSL across a wide spectrum of tumors and controls. TMPRSS2 was overexpressed in cervical squamous cell carcinoma and endocervical adenocarcinoma, colon adenocarcinoma, prostate adenocarcinoma (PRAD), rectum adenocarcinoma (READ), uterine corpus endometrial carcinoma and uterine carcinosarcoma, with PRAD and READ exhibiting the highest expression of all cancers. CTSL was upregulated in lymphoid neoplasm diffuse large B­cell lymphoma, oesophageal carcinoma, glioblastoma multiforme, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, lower grade glioma, pancreatic adenocarcinoma, skin cutaneous melanoma, stomach adenocarcinoma, and thymoma. Hypo­methylation of both genes was evident in most cases where they have been highly upregulated. We have expanded on our observations by including data relating to mutations and copy number alterations at pan­cancer level. The novel hypotheses that are stemming out of these data need to be further investigated and validated in large clinical studies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Biomarkers, Tumor/genetics , Cathepsin L/genetics , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Neoplasms/genetics , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Serine Endopeptidases/genetics , Virus Internalization , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/enzymology , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , DNA Methylation , Databases, Genetic , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Male , Neoplasms/enzymology , Neoplasms/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/enzymology , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/enzymology , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 18(3): 270-274, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-594580

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: The novel 2019 coronavirus (COVID-19) was first described in December 2019 in Wuhan, China and subsequently announced as a pandemic on March 12, 2020. In several studies, solid-organ transplant recipients were reported to have higher risk for COVID-19. Here, we aimed to determine the frequency of COVID-19 in our kidney and liver transplant patients. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Our study included 583 transplant patients who were admitted to our outpatient transplant clinics and emergency departments between March 1 and May 1, 2020. Seventy-four of them were liver transplant recipients (46 male, 28 female, of which 14 were pediatric and 60 were adult patients) and 509 of them were kidney transplant recipients (347 male, 162 female, of which 16 were pediatric and 493 were adult patients). We retrospectively evaluated demographic characteristics, currently used immunosuppressant treatment, present complaints, treatment and diagnosis of comorbid diseases, and results of COVID-19 tests. RESULTS: Of 583 transplant recipients, 538 were seen in our outpatient transplant clinics and 45 were seen in our emergency departments. Of these, 18 patients who had had cough and fever were evaluated by respiratory clinic doctors, and nasopharyngeal swab samples were taken. One kidney transplant recipient had a positive COVID-19 test; he was followed with home isolation. He received treatment with hydroxychloroquine (400 mg/day). The other 17 patients had negative tests. There were no mortalities due to COVID-19. CONCLUSIONS: Transplant patients also got affected during the COVID-19 pandemic. According to the data of our centers, this effect is not much more different from the normal population. We recommend that transplant recipients should be warned in terms of personal hygiene and should be closely monitored by organ transplant centers. If there is an indication for hospitalization, they should be followed in an isolated unit, with no aggressive changes made to immunosuppressive doses unless necessary.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Liver Transplantation/adverse effects , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Drug Therapy, Combination , Female , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Male , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Treatment Outcome , Turkey/epidemiology
12.
Exp Clin Transplant ; 18(3): 275-283, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-594579

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVES: COVID-19 is a great threat to the modern world and significant threat to immunocompromised patients, including patients with chronic renal failure. We evaluated COVID-19 incidence among our hemodialysis patients and investigated the most probable immune mechanisms against COVID-19. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Baskent University has 21 dialysis centers across Turkey, with 2420 patients on hemodialysis and 30 on peritoneal dialysis. Among these, we retrospectively evaluated 602 patients (257 female/345 male) with chronic renal failure receiving hemodialysis as renal replacement therapy; 7 patients (1.1%) were infected with SARS-CoV-2. We retrospectively collected patient demographic characteristics, clinical data, and immunological factors affecting the clinical course of the disease. We divided patients into groups and included 2 control groups (individuals with normal renal functions): group I included COVID-19-positive patients with normal renal function, group II included COVID-19-positive hemodialysis patients, group III included COVID-19-negative hemodialysis patients, and group IV included COVID-19-negative patients with normal renal function. Lymphocyte subsets in peripheral blood and typing of human leukocyte antigens were analyzed in all groups, with killer cell immunoglobulin like receptor genes analyzed only in COVID-19-positive patients and healthy controls. RESULTS: No deaths occurred among the 7 COVID-19-positive hemodialysis patients. Group I patients were significantly older than patients in groups II and III (P = .039, P = .030, respectively) but not significantly different from group IV (P = .060). Absolute counts of natural killer cells in healthy controls were higherthan in other groups (but not significantly). ActivatedT cells were significantly increased in both COVID-19-positive groups versus COVID-19-negative groups. Groups showed significant differences in C and DQ loci with respect to distribution of alleles in both HLA classes. CONCLUSIONS: Although immunocompromised patients are at greater risk for COVID-19, we found lower COVID-19 incidence in our hemodialysis patients, which should be further investigated in in vitro and molecular studies.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Immunocompromised Host , Kidney Failure, Chronic/therapy , Opportunistic Infections/epidemiology , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , Renal Dialysis/adverse effects , Adolescent , Adult , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , HLA Antigens/immunology , Host-Pathogen Interactions , Humans , Incidence , Kidney Failure, Chronic/diagnosis , Kidney Failure, Chronic/epidemiology , Kidney Failure, Chronic/immunology , Killer Cells, Natural/immunology , Lymphocyte Activation , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Retrospective Studies , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , T-Lymphocytes/immunology , Treatment Outcome , Turkey/epidemiology , Young Adult
13.
Gulf J Oncolog ; 1(33): 7-18, 2020 May.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-485461

ABSTRACT

The outbreak of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has become a public health emergency of major international concern. In December 2019, an outbreak of atypical pneumonia known as COVID-19 was identified in Wuhan, China. The newly identified zoonotic coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus-2 (SARSCoV-2), is characterized by rapid human-to-human transmission. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients are often in need for intensive chemotherapy to induce remission that will be complicated with prolonged period of cytopenias. They are often recalled to the hospital for treatment and disease surveillance. These patients may be immunocompromised due to the underlying malignancy or anti-cancer therapy. ALL patients are at higher risk of developing life-threatening infections. Several factors increase the risk of infection and the presence of multiple risk factors in the same patient is common. Cancer patients had an estimated 2-fold increased risk of contracting SARS-CoV-2 than the general population. With the World Health Organization declaring the novel coronavirus outbreak a pandemic, there is an urgent need to address the impact of such pandemic on ALL patients. This include changes to resource allocation, clinical care, and the consent process during a pandemic. Currently and due to limited data, there are no international guidelines to address the optimal management of ALL patients in any infectious pandemic. In this review, we will address the potential challenges associated with managing ALL patients during the COVID-19 infection pandemic with suggestions of some practical approaches, focusing on screening asymptomatic ALL patients, diagnostic and response evaluation and choice of chemotherapy in different scenarios and setting and use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT).


Subject(s)
Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus/pathogenicity , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation/adverse effects , Immunocompromised Host , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/therapy , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , Clinical Decision-Making , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Coronavirus Infections/transmission , Critical Pathways , Decision Support Techniques , Humans , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Opportunistic Infections/immunology , Opportunistic Infections/transmission , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , Pneumonia, Viral/transmission , Precursor Cell Lymphoblastic Leukemia-Lymphoma/immunology , Risk Assessment , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2
15.
Eur Urol ; 77(6): 748-754, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-72255

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Previous studies on coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) have focused on populations with normal immunity, but lack data on immunocompromised populations. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the clinical features and outcomes of COVID-19 pneumonia in kidney transplant recipients. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: A total of 10 renal transplant recipients with laboratory-confirmed COVID-19 pneumonia were enrolled in this retrospective study. In addition, 10 of their family members diagnosed with COVID-19 pneumonia were included in the control group. INTERVENTION: Immunosuppressant reduction and low-dose methylprednisolone therapy. OUTCOME MEASUREMENTS AND STATISTICAL ANALYSIS: The clinical outcomes (the severity of pneumonia, recovery rate, time of virus shedding, and length of illness) were compared with the control group by statistical analysis. RESULTS AND LIMITATIONS: The clinical symptomatic, laboratory, and radiological characteristics of COVID-19 pneumonia in the renal transplant recipients were similar to those of severe COVID-19 pneumonia in the general population. The severity of COVID-19 pneumonia was greater in the transplant recipients than in the control group (five severe/three critical cases vs one severe case). Five patients developed transient renal allograft damage. After a longer time of virus shedding (28.4 ± 9.3 vs 12.2 ± 4.6 d in the control group) and a longer course of illness (35.3 ± 8.3 vs 18.8 ± 10.5 d in the control group), nine of the 10 transplant patients recovered successfully after treatment. One patient developed acute renal graft failure and died of progressive respiratory failure. CONCLUSIONS: Kidney transplant recipients had more severe COVID-19 pneumonia than the general population, but most of them recovered after a prolonged clinical course and virus shedding. Findings from this small group of cases may have important implications for the treatment of COVID-19 pneumonia in immunosuppressed populations. PATIENT SUMMARY: Immunosuppressed transplant recipients with coronavirus disease 2019 infection had more severe pneumonia, but most of them still achieved a good prognosis after appropriate treatment.


Subject(s)
Antiviral Agents/administration & dosage , Betacoronavirus/drug effects , Coronavirus Infections/drug therapy , Glucocorticoids/administration & dosage , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Methylprednisolone/administration & dosage , Opportunistic Infections/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/drug therapy , Transplant Recipients , Adult , Aged , Antiviral Agents/adverse effects , Betacoronavirus/immunology , Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Coronavirus Infections/mortality , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Glucocorticoids/adverse effects , Humans , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Kidney Transplantation/mortality , Male , Methylprednisolone/adverse effects , Middle Aged , Noninvasive Ventilation , Opportunistic Infections/mortality , Opportunistic Infections/therapy , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Oxygen Inhalation Therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/mortality , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , Retrospective Studies , Risk Factors , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome , Virus Shedding , Young Adult
17.
Eur Urol ; 77(6): 742-747, 2020 06.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-27850

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a novel and lethal infectious disease, posing a threat to global health security. The number of cases has increased rapidly, but no data concerning kidney transplant (KTx) recipients infected with COVID-19 are available. To present the epidemiological, clinical, and therapeutic characteristics of KTx recipients infected with COVID-19, we report on a case series of five patients who were confirmed as having COVID-19 through nucleic acid testing (NAT) from January 1, 2020 to February 28, 2020. The most common symptoms on admission to hospital were fever (five patients, 100%), cough (five patients, 100%), myalgia or fatigue (three patients, 60%), and sputum production (three patients, 60%); serum creatinine or urea nitrogen levels were slightly higher than those before symptom onset. Four patients received a reduced dose of maintenance immunosuppressive therapy during hospitalization. As of March 4, 2020 NAT was negative for COVID-19 in three patients twice in succession, and their computed tomography scans showed improved images. Although greater patient numbers and long-term follow-up data are needed, our series demonstrates that mild COVID-19 infection in KTx recipients can be managed using symptomatic support therapy combined with adjusted maintenance immunosuppressive therapy.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus/isolation & purification , Clinical Laboratory Techniques , Coronavirus Infections/diagnosis , Immunosuppressive Agents/adverse effects , Kidney Transplantation/adverse effects , Opportunistic Infections/diagnosis , Pneumonia, Viral/diagnosis , Transplant Recipients , Adult , Betacoronavirus/genetics , Betacoronavirus/immunology , COVID-19 , COVID-19 Testing , China , Coronavirus Infections/therapy , Coronavirus Infections/virology , Female , Humans , Immunocompromised Host , Immunosuppressive Agents/administration & dosage , Male , Middle Aged , Opportunistic Infections/therapy , Opportunistic Infections/virology , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/virology , Predictive Value of Tests , SARS-CoV-2 , Severity of Illness Index , Time Factors , Treatment Outcome
SELECTION OF CITATIONS
SEARCH DETAIL