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1.
Doc Ophthalmol ; 145(1): 65-70, 2022 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1906212

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Due to the emergence of COVID-19, many countries have started mass immunization programs. To date, no cases of optic neuritis following COVID-19 vaccination have been reported in the literature. CASE PRESENTATION: Objective: Here, we report 2 cases of unilateral optic neuritis after vaccination against COVID-19 using the Sinopharm vaccine (Sinopharm Group Co. Ltd, China). DESIGN: The clinical history, examination, and test findings of two individuals with unilateral optic neuritis associated with the timing of COVID-19 vaccination were described and further analyzed. SETTING: Two patients developed optic neuritis after receiving the COVID-19 vaccine. One patient developed optic neuritis 6 weeks after the first dose and 3 weeks after the second dose. The other patient developed optic neuritis 3 weeks after the first dose. PARTICIPANTS: Two female patients, aged 21 and 39 years. RESULT: The patients were successfully treated with intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy. Both patients had typical manifestations of optic neuritis and their visual acuity recovered fully after treatment. The second of these patients was positive for anti-myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein antibodies (MOG). CONCLUSION: Optic neuritis is a potential adverse effect after vaccination against the coronavirus disease (COVID-19).


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Optic Neuritis , Adult , Autoantibodies , COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , Electroretinography , Female , Humans , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein/therapeutic use , Optic Neuritis/diagnosis , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , Optic Neuritis/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects
2.
BMC Neurol ; 22(1): 54, 2022 Feb 12.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1677495

ABSTRACT

BACKGROUND: Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) is a rare immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating disease of the central nervous system. We report a case of ADEM presenting with bilateral optic neuritis temporally associated with the ChAdOx1 vaccine against SARS-COVID19 virus. CASE PRESENTATION: A 36-year-old female presented with bilateral optic neuritis following her first dose of the ChAdOx1 vaccine. Initial MRI Brain showed evidence of demyelination within the subcortical white matter, with no radiological involvement of the optic nerves. Visual evoked potentials were consistent with bilateral optic neuritis which was confirmed radiologically on follow up MRI. She was treated with intravenous steroids with improvement both in symptoms and radiological appearance. A pseudo-relapse occurred which was treated with a further course of intravenous steroids followed by an oral taper. The clinical, radiological and serological results were most consistent with diagnosis of ADEM. CONCLUSIONS: ADEM is an exceedingly rare complication of ChAdOx1 vaccine despite millions of doses. While it is imperative clinicians remain aware of neurological complications of vaccines, the importance of vaccination to control a pandemic should not be undermined.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated , Optic Neuritis , Adult , COVID-19 Vaccines , Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated/diagnostic imaging , Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated/drug therapy , Encephalomyelitis, Acute Disseminated/etiology , Evoked Potentials, Visual , Female , Humans , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , Optic Neuritis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Vaccination
3.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 70(1): 310-316, 2022 Jan.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1594545

ABSTRACT

Neuroophthalmic manifestations are very rare in corona virus disease-19 (COVID-19) infection. Only few reports have been published till date describing COVID-19-associated neuroophthalmic manifestations. We, hereby, present a series of three cases who developed optic neuritis during the recovery period from COVID-19 infection. Among the three patients, demyelinating lesions were identified in two cases, while another case was associated with serum antibodies against myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein. All three patients received intravenous methylprednisolone followed by oral steroids according to the Optic Neuritis Treatment Trail ptotocol. Vision recovery was noted in all three patients, which was maintained at 2 months of the last follow up visit.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Optic Neuritis , Autoantibodies , Humans , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein , Optic Neuritis/diagnosis , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
4.
Indian J Ophthalmol ; 69(12): 3761-3764, 2021 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1538664

ABSTRACT

Coronavirus disease 19 (COVID-19) and its ophthalmic manifestations have been variably portrayed. We report a case of a 56-year-old female presenting with sudden-onset vision loss associated with painful extraocular muscle movements in both eyes following COVID-19. Visual acuity was counting fingers close to face. Color perception tested was inaccurate. Ocular examination revealed sluggishly reacting pupils and an otherwise unremarkable fundus picture in both eyes, giving us an impression of bilateral retrobulbar neuritis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the brain and orbit were unremarkable, while blood investigations revealed nothing suggestive. The patient dramatically improved with steroid therapy with full visual recovery and a color vision defect. This presentation of bilateral retrobulbar neuritis as a sequela of COVID-19 is presented for its rarity.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Optic Neuritis , Female , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Middle Aged , Optic Neuritis/diagnosis , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , Optic Neuritis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Visual Acuity
5.
Ocul Immunol Inflamm ; 29(6): 1200-1206, 2021 Aug 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1360249

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To describe a case of acute thyroiditis and bilateral optic neuritis associated with SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. METHODS: A single case report from a tertiary referral center. RESULTS: The patient described in the following case report developed acute thyroiditis and bilateral optic neuritis following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination. The patient underwent pulse therapy followed by oral tapering corticosteroid therapy with an improvement of the bilateral disc swelling and the visual field, and recovery of thyroid-stimulating hormone to the normal limits. CONCLUSION: Although the association between immunization and the onset of demyelinating manifestations of the central nervous system is well documented, this is the first reported case of bilateral optic neuritis and acute thyroiditis and subsequent to administration of vaccination against SARS-CoV-2.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 Vaccines/adverse effects , COVID-19/prevention & control , Optic Neuritis/etiology , SARS-CoV-2 , Thyroiditis/etiology , Vaccination/adverse effects , Acute Disease , Adult , Female , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Magnetic Resonance Imaging , Optic Neuritis/diagnosis , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , Orbit/diagnostic imaging , Pulse Therapy, Drug , Thyroiditis/diagnosis , Thyroiditis/drug therapy , Tomography, Optical Coherence , Visual Acuity/physiology
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(19): e25865, 2021 May 14.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1262271

ABSTRACT

RATIONALE: Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) has spread worldwide. It involves multiple organs of infected individuals and encompasses diverse clinical manifestations. We report a case of acute optic neuritis (ON) associated with myelin oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG) antibody possibly induced by COVID-19. PATIENT CONCERNS: A 47-year-old man presented to our clinic with left eye pain and vision loss. Magnetic resonance imaging of the orbit revealed the bilateral high intensity of the optic nerve sheaths. He tested positive for COVID-19 by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing on the day of admission but he had no signs of respiratory illness. Laboratory testing revealed that MOG immunoglobulin G (MOG IgG) was positive, but other antibodies including aquaporin-4 were negative. DIAGNOSIS: The patient was diagnosed with MOG antibody-positive acute ON possibly induced by COVID-19. INTERVENTIONS: Steroid pulse therapy consisting of methylprednisolone 1 g/day for a total of 3 days, followed by an oral prednisolone taper was performed. OUTCOMES: His left eye pain was immediately relieved, and his decimal vision improved from 0.03 to 0.1 on the day of discharge. Outpatient follow-up 2 weeks later revealed left a decimal vision of 1.2, and a complete resolution of the left eye pain. LESSONS: Our case indicated that COVID-19 might trigger an autoimmune response that leads to MOG antibody-associated ON, similar to other pathogens that were reported in the past. The treatment response to steroid pulse therapy was preferable following a typical course of MOG antibody-positive ON.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Myelin-Oligodendrocyte Glycoprotein/immunology , Optic Neuritis/etiology , Optic Neuritis/immunology , Autoantibodies , Glucocorticoids/therapeutic use , Humans , Male , Methylprednisolone/therapeutic use , Middle Aged , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , SARS-CoV-2
8.
J Neuroophthalmol ; 40(3): 305-314, 2020 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-682845

ABSTRACT

The initiation and continuation of immune-based therapies to treat and prevent complications of inflammatory neuro-ophthalmologic disorders during the 2019 novel coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic is the subject of considerable debate. In each case, a treatment decision must be reached based on best clinical practices for the disorder, patient comorbidities, the current state of knowledge about the pathogenesis and infectivity of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), and the utilization of hospital and community resources. Unfortunately, the evidence needed to standardize the decision-making process for each neuro-ophthalmologic disorder is currently absent and is likely to require months or years to develop based on the accrual of robust international data sets. In this article, we review the current understanding of SARS-CoV-2 and COVID-19 complications to provide a framework for approaching the treatment of inflammatory neuro-ophthalmic disorders during the COVID-19 viral pandemic.


Subject(s)
Betacoronavirus , Coronavirus Infections/epidemiology , Eye Diseases/drug therapy , Inflammation/drug therapy , Nervous System Diseases/drug therapy , Pandemics , Pneumonia, Viral/epidemiology , COVID-19 , Coronavirus Infections/immunology , Giant Cell Arteritis/drug therapy , Humans , Immunomodulation , Immunosuppressive Agents/therapeutic use , Myasthenia Gravis/drug therapy , Optic Neuritis/drug therapy , Pneumonia, Viral/immunology , SARS-CoV-2
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