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1.
Molecules ; 27(1)2022 Jan 02.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1613909

ABSTRACT

Conducted studies indicate the relationship between oral health and systemic diseases. Moreover, the latest research indicated that cariogenic bacteria may severely influence the course of SARS-CoV-2 infection and increase risk of COVID-19 complications. This article aims to review various applications of propolis and pay attention to a healthy diet rich in polyphenols, which may allow the reduction of dental plaque accumulation. A literature review has been conducted from June until November 2021. It showed that propolis could be a useful agent in decreasing the accumulation of dental plaque. Moreover, a diet rich in polyphenols prevents cariogenic bacteria and reduces the accumulation of dental plaque. A reduction of a dental plaque may influence the risk of a severe course of COVID-19. Therefore, propolis and a diet rich in polyphenols may play an important role in prophylaxis of systemic diseases. Recently, it has been proven that oral infection may affect cardiovascular system, musculoskeletal system, respiratory system, nervous system, as well as may be a risk factor for diabetes mellitus. These aspects should stimulate clinicians to further research about polyphenols.


Subject(s)
Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , COVID-19/prevention & control , Cariostatic Agents/therapeutic use , Dental Plaque/drug therapy , Diet , Propolis/therapeutic use , SARS-CoV-2/drug effects , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/virology , Humans , Oral Health
2.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(24)2021 12 20.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1595516

ABSTRACT

The Oral Health Impact Profile-14 (OHIP-14) has been used to assess the impact that oral health problems can have on an individual's life. Different theoretical models were proposed to evaluate the results. The aims of this study were to evaluate the fit of different factorial models of the OHIP-14 to non-dental patients (NDP) and dental patients (DP) samples from Brazil and Finland and to estimate the differential functioning of the items in the OHIP-14 between the samples. Two studies were conducted, one in Brazil and the other in Finland, composed of five samples (Brazil-Sample 1 (S1): DP, n = 434, age: 25.3 [SD = 6.3] years; S2: NDP, n = 1486, age: 24.7 [SD = 5.6] years; S3: DP, n = 439, age: 29.0 [SD = 6.7] years; Finland-S4: DP, n = 482, age: 26.3 [SD = 5.4] years; S5: NDP, n = 2425, age: 26.7 [DP = 5.5] years). The fit of the OHIP-14 models to the data was estimated using a confirmatory strategy (validity based on the internal structure). Differential item functioning (DIF) between samples was estimated. For NDP from both countries, the response pattern severely violated the normality assumption in six items of the OHIP-14, indicating that the instrument does not fit for these samples. For DP, the model with the best fit was unifactorial, which deals with the estimation of the general impact of oral health on an individual's life, without addressing specific dimensions. Configural invariance was refuted between samples. DIF indicated that the characteristic of the sample (NDP and DP) in both countries interfered in the response given to the items, with the response level being more adequate for the latent PD trait. The validity of data related to the impact of oral health problems on an individual's life was confirmed through a unifactorial model. OHIP-14 works properly in DP samples and was limited in NDP samples, being also influenced by cultural context and age.


Subject(s)
Oral Health , Quality of Life , Adult , Brazil , Humans , Psychometrics , Reproducibility of Results , Surveys and Questionnaires , Young Adult
3.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(21)2021 11 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1512311

ABSTRACT

This study investigated the effect of oral health education using a mobile app (OHEMA) on the oral health and swallowing-related quality of life (SWAL-QoL) of the elderly population in a community-based integrated care project (CICP). Forty elderly individuals in the CICP were randomized into intervention and control groups. OHEMA provided information on customized oral health care management, oral exercises, and intraoral and extraoral massage methods for 50 min/session, once a week, for 6 weeks. Pre- and post-intervention surveys assessed the unstimulated salivary flow rate, subjective oral dryness, tongue pressure, and SWAL-QoL, which were analyzed using ANCOVA and repeated measures ANOVA. In the intervention group, tongue pressure increased significantly from pre- (17.75) to post-intervention (27.24) (p < 0.001), and subjective oral dryness decreased from pre- (30.75) to post-intervention (18.50). The unstimulated salivary flow rate had a higher mean score in the intervention group (7.19) than in the control group (5.04) (p < 0.001). The SWAL-QoL significantly improved from pre- (152.10) to post-intervention (171.50) in the intervention group (p < 0.001) but did not change significantly in the control group (p > 0.05). OHEMA appears to be a useful tool for oral health education for the elderly as it improved the SWAL-QoL, with increased tongue pressure and reduced oral dryness.


Subject(s)
Delivery of Health Care, Integrated , Mobile Applications , Aged , Deglutition , Health Education , Humans , Oral Health , Pressure , Quality of Life , Tongue
4.
Prim Dent J ; 10(3): 2, 2021 09.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1501961
5.
Medicina (Kaunas) ; 57(11)2021 Nov 01.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1488671

ABSTRACT

In 2019, a new type of coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, the causing agent of COVID-19, was first detected in Wuhan, China. On 11 March 2020, the World Health Organization declared a pandemic. The manifestations of COVID-19 are mostly age-dependent and potentially more severe in cases with involved co-morbidities. The gravity of the symptoms depends on the clinical stage of the infection. The most common symptoms include runny nose and nasal congestion, anosmia, dysgeusia or hypogeusia, diarrhea, nausea/vomiting, respiratory distress, fatigue, ocular symptoms, diarrhea, vomiting, and abdominal pain. These systemic conditions are often accompanied by skin and mucosal lesions. Oral lesions reported in patients with COVID-19 include: herpex simplex, candidiasis, geographic tongue, aphthous-like ulcers, hemorrhagic ulcerations, necrotic ulcerations, white hairy tongue, reddish macules, erythematous surfaces, petechiae, and pustular enanthema. It is still unclear if these manifestations are a direct result of the viral infection, a consequence of systemic deterioration, or adverse reactions to treatments. Poor oral hygiene in hospitalized or quarantined COVID-19 patients should also be considered as an aggravating condition. This narrative review is focused on presenting the most relevant data from the literature regarding oral manifestations related to SARS-CoV-2, as well as the challenges faced by the dental system during this pandemic. A routine intraoral examination is recommended in COVID-19 patients, either suspected or confirmed, as, in certain cases, oral manifestations represent a sign of severe infection or even of a life-threatening condition. It is our belief that extensive knowledge of all possible manifestations, including oral lesions, in cases of COVID-19 is of great importance in the present uncertain context, including new, currently emerging viral variants with unknown future impact.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , China , Humans , Oral Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
6.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(40): e27500, 2021 Oct 08.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1462564

ABSTRACT

ABSTRACT: The coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected various aspects, including socioeconomic status and health. This retrospective study aimed to investigate the influence of the COVID-19 pandemic on oral health based on the number of teeth that contribute to mastication, and the nutritional status of elderly patients with digestive cancers.The authors defined the before and during COVID-19 periods in this study as January 2019 to December 2019 and January 2020 to December 2020, respectively. Patients with digestive cancer who underwent general, laboratory, and orthopantomograph examinations for preoperative oral health assessment before general anesthesia participated in this study. The authors investigated the following general characteristics: (1) sex, (2) age, and (3) the organ affected by disease and scheduled for surgery under general anesthesia. The authors collected information about (4) the number of teeth that could contribute to mastication as a clinical oral health parameter. The parameters: (5) body mass index, (6) serum total protein levels, and (7) serum albumin levels were used to indicate the nutritional status.A total of 233 elderly patients with digestive cancer participated in this study. There was no significant difference between the age of the patients with digestive cancer. There was also no significant difference in the number of teeth that could contribute to mastication. Additionally, there was no significant difference in nutritional status as indicated by the body mass index, serum total protein levels, and serum albumin levels.This study showed that the COVID-19 pandemic during 2020 did not have a significant influence on the oral health and nutritional status of elderly patients with digestive cancer. However, the influence of COVID-19 on community oral health may become apparent in the future. Thus, dental professionals should continue further research regarding the effects of COVID-19 on oral health.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/epidemiology , Gastrointestinal Neoplasms/epidemiology , Nutritional Status , Oral Health/statistics & numerical data , Age Factors , Aged , Aged, 80 and over , Blood Proteins , Body Mass Index , Female , Health Status , Humans , Japan/epidemiology , Male , Mastication/physiology , Pandemics , Retrospective Studies , SARS-CoV-2 , Serum Albumin , Sex Factors , Socioeconomic Factors , Tooth Loss/epidemiology
7.
IEEE Pulse ; 12(2): 22-27, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1447883

ABSTRACT

About a decade ago, Dian Baker, a professor at Sacramento State School of Nursing, responded to a directive from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) asking health care practitioners to do something about the thorny and serious problem of ventilator hospital-acquired pneumonia, which afflicts thousands of people each year. After consulting with colleagues on the issue, Baker noticed something interesting. Although hospital ventilators had been widely assumed to be the cause of this problem, the truth was that most people getting pneumonia in hospitals weren't on ventilators. The true culprit may come as a surprise: Nurses were shirking the unpleasant task of brushing the teeth of seriously ill patients.


Subject(s)
Dental Care , Dental Caries , Medically Underserved Area , Primary Health Care , Adult , Child , Dental Caries/prevention & control , Dental Caries/therapy , Humans , Oral Health , Pneumonia, Ventilator-Associated/nursing
9.
Oral Dis ; 27 Suppl 3: 703-706, 2021 Apr.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1434787

ABSTRACT

Health services across the world face an unprecedented situation as a result of a global COVID-19 outbreak. Urgent joined research efforts regarding the SARS-COV-2 rapid tests, accurate diagnosis, especially early recognition, and effective treatment of life-threatening complications would be highly desirable for humanity and medical workforce all over the world that try to combat a current global pandemic threat. Due to indirect complex effect, intensified COVID-19 therapies and multi-drug treatment, it is believed that some oral conditions could be aggravated by COVID-19 disease, particularly those with autoimmune aetiology, linked to compromised immune system or long-term pharmacotherapy.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Communicable Diseases , Humans , Oral Health , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
10.
Ghana Med J ; 54(4 Suppl): 100-103, 2020 Dec.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1436201

ABSTRACT

With the advent of the COVID-19 pandemic, healthcare systems and their provision of care has globally been challenged, including the delivery of Oral healthcare. In Ghana, it has become imperative that healthcare delivery including the practice of Dentistry and its sub-specialties be re-oriented in our peculiar setting to ensure minimal risk of spread of the infection. This article discusses the impact of COVID-19 on the practice of Dentistry in the country.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Delivery of Health Care/trends , Dentistry/trends , Infection Control/trends , Practice Patterns, Dentists'/trends , Ghana , Humans , Oral Health/trends , SARS-CoV-2
11.
Molecules ; 26(18)2021 Sep 11.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1410347

ABSTRACT

Current studies suggest that cariogenic bacteria in dental plaque influence the severity of COVID-19 complications since the oral cavity is a reservoir for respiratory pathogens potentially responsible for the development of hospital-acquired pneumonia. This article focuses on the association between dental plaque and COVID-19 concerning the influence of altered oral biofilm on the risk of increased severity of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Moreover, it concentrates on the usefulness of propolis, with its apitherapeutic antibacterial properties, for treating oral bacterial infections co-occurring with SARS-CoV-2 infection. A review of the literature on PubMed, Cochrane Library and Medline between 2000 and 2021 revealed 56 published articles indicating that a link between dental plaque and COVID-19 complications was probable. Furthermore, they indicated that propolis may minimize COVID-19 severity by reducing dental plaque accumulation. The possibility that improved oral health could reduce the risk of COVID-19 complications should be of interest to scientists.


Subject(s)
Biofilms , COVID-19 , Dental Caries , Dental Plaque , Mouth Diseases , Propolis/therapeutic use , Animals , Anti-Infective Agents/therapeutic use , Biofilms/drug effects , COVID-19/drug therapy , COVID-19/microbiology , Dental Caries/drug therapy , Dental Caries/microbiology , Dental Plaque/drug therapy , Dental Plaque/microbiology , Humans , Mouth Diseases/drug therapy , Mouth Diseases/microbiology , Oral Health
13.
Oral Health Prev Dent ; 19(1): 411-423, 2021 Jan 07.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1403453

ABSTRACT

PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of COVID-19 fear on oral health status. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 1227 participants were enrolled in the study. The online survey link was circulated and responses were received. The questionnaire comprised a total of 24 closed-ended questions, which were divided into three sections. The first section focused on demographic information, the second section on the fear of COVID-19, and the third section focused on oral hygiene habits, dental complaints, and tendency to go to the dentist during the COVID-19 pandemic. RESULTS: Participants who had a higher fear score compared to other respective populations during the corona virus pandemic started brushing more regularly, started to use oral care products more regularly (p = 0.001), increased sugary food consumption (p = 0.001), increased meat consumption (p = 0.017), increased vegetable consumption (p = 0.019), had increased tooth hypersensitivity, had increased toothache, had increased swelling/abscess on face due to tooth decay (p = 0.001), had increased restoration failures, had increased problems with prostheses (p = 0.007), had increased bleeding and pain in the periodontal tissue, had increased oral malodor, had increased bruxism (p = 0.001), had a dental problem but hesitated to visit a dentist, and thought that dental clinics are at risk of COVID-19 contamination (p = 0.001). CONCLUSION: Fear of COVID-19 was higher in participants who started to pay more attention to their oral hygiene habits, had a change in food consumption frequency and rate, had an increase in oral and dental health complaints, and had dental problems but hesitated to visit a dentist.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Oral Health , Fear , Humans , Pandemics , SARS-CoV-2
14.
PLoS One ; 16(9): e0257035, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1398938

ABSTRACT

In several nations, caries in pre-school children remain a significant oral health issue. In an outbreak period such as the Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), remote contact and education aimed at the prevention of oral diseases and the preservation of children's oral health are more relevant than ever. Currently, the amount of published applications is far higher than the published scientific studies while the problems of usability remains vulnerable. The goal of this paper was to comprehensively document the phase of development and usability testing of a mobile application for diet and oral health, namely Gigiku Sihat, which was primarily intended to be used by parents and guardians of pre-school children. The mobile application was developed using the System Development Life Cycle principle. Apart from searching for the available oral health application on Android platform, the initial requirement gathering process consisted of situational analysis, concept generation, content development, and features and functional requirement determination. The mobile application design and implementation evolved at each phase before being finalised. Gigiku Sihat was successfully developed in the Bahasa Malaysia. Finalised Gigiku Sihat was installed on mobile devices to determine the usability using translated and validated System Usability Scale questionnaire namely Skala Kebolehgunaan Aplikasi Mudah Alih (SKAMA). The mean score usability with score of 68 and above was deemed to have good usability. This study found that Gigiku Sihat mean (SD) usability score was 77.0 (14.18). The results were promising as they showed that Gigiku Sihat had a good usability. Thus, the development of this mobile application focusing on diet and oral health served as a new source of oral health education and provided a necessary foundation in developing future improved mobile application development for parents in the prevention of early childhood caries.


Subject(s)
Mobile Applications/statistics & numerical data , Oral Health/statistics & numerical data , Adult , COVID-19/epidemiology , Diet/statistics & numerical data , Female , Humans , Malaysia , SARS-CoV-2/pathogenicity , Surveys and Questionnaires/statistics & numerical data , User-Centered Design , User-Computer Interface
15.
J Am Dent Assoc ; 152(9): 713-716, 2021 Sep.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1392112

Subject(s)
Oral Health , Humans
16.
Periodontol 2000 ; 87(1): 11-16, 2021 10.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1379599

ABSTRACT

The landscape in dentistry is changing as emerging studies continue to reveal that periodontal health impacts systemic health, and vice versa. Population studies, clinical studies, and in vitro animal studies underscore the critical importance of oral health to systemic health. These inextricable relationships come to the forefront as oral diseases, such as periodontal disease, take root. Special populations bring to bear the multimodal relationships between oral and systemic health. Specifically, periodontal disease has been associated with diabetes, metabolic syndrome, obesity, eating disorders, liver disease, cardiovascular disease, Alzheimer disease, rheumatoid arthritis, adverse pregnancy outcomes, and cancer. Although bidirectional relationships are recognized, the potential for multiple comorbidities, relationships, and connections (multimodal relationships) also exists. Proposed mechanisms that mediate this connection between oral and systemic health include predisposing and precipitating factors, such as genetic factors (gene polymorphisms), environmental factors (stress, habits-such as smoking and high-fat diets/consumption of highly processed foods), medications, microbial dysbiosis and bacteremias/viremias/microbemias, and an altered host immune response. Thus, in a susceptible host, these predisposing and precipitating factors trigger the onset of periodontal disease and systemic disease/conditions. Further, high-throughput sequencing technologies are shedding light on the dark matter that comprises the oral microbiome. This has resulted in better characterization of the oral microbial dysbiosis, including putative bacterial periodontopathogens and shifts in oral virome composition during disease. Multiple laboratory and clinical studies have illustrated that both eukaryotic and prokaryotic viruses within subgingival plaque and periodontal tissues affect periodontal inflammation, putative periodontopathogens, and the host immune response. Although the association between herpesviruses and periodontitis and the degree to which these viruses directly aggravate periodontal tissue damage remain unclear, the benefits to periodontal health found from prolonged administration of antivirals in immunocompromised or immunodeficient individuals demonstrates that specific populations are possibly more susceptible to viral periodontopathogens. Thus, it may be important to further examine the implications of viral pathogen involvement in periodontitis and perhaps it is time to embrace the viral dark matter within the periodontal environment to fully comprehend the pathogenesis and systemic implications of periodontitis. Emerging data from the coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic further underscores the inextricable connection between oral and systemic health, with high levels of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 receptor noted on oral tissues (tongue) and an allostatic load or overload paradigm of chronic stress likely contributing to rapid breakdown of oral/dental, periodontal, and peri-implant tissues. These associations exist within a framework of viremias/bacteremias/microbemias, systemic inflammation, and/or disturbances of the immune system in a susceptible host. A thorough review of systemic and oral diseases and conditions and their mechanistic, predisposing, and precipitating factors are paramount to better addressing the oral and systemic health and needs of our patients.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Periodontal Diseases , Animals , Dysbiosis , Female , Humans , Oral Health , Pregnancy , SARS-CoV-2
17.
Int J Environ Res Public Health ; 18(8)2021 04 18.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1378408

ABSTRACT

The oral health of older adults is an important factor affecting their overall health and quality of life. This study aimed to identify the characteristics of oral health of older adults living at home in rural areas and investigate factors affecting oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL), especially oral dryness and oral health knowledge and behavior. A descriptive correlational study was conducted. In total, 117 participants were included in the final analysis. Data were collected using questionnaires for oral dryness, oral health knowledge and behavior, and OHRQoL. In addition, oral dryness was measured by mechanical measurements. Oral health knowledge was positively correlated with oral health behavior (r = 0.18, p = 0.029) and OHRQoL (r = 0.25, p = 0.003). In addition, a positive correlation between oral health behavior and OHRQoL (r = 0.24, p = 0.005) was observed. Multiple regression analysis revealed that subjective oral dryness (ß = -4.99, p = 0.001) had a significant effect on OHRQoL. To improve OHRQoL in the rural elderly, health providers should pay attention to oral dryness and comprehensively evaluate it. The development of prevention programs and continuous education that can improve oral health knowledge and behavior is also required.


Subject(s)
Quality of Life , Xerostomia , Aged , Cross-Sectional Studies , Humans , Oral Health , Surveys and Questionnaires
18.
Front Public Health ; 9: 635081, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1359252

ABSTRACT

Managing the oral health of children during the time of a health emergency linked to the current COVID-19 pandemic presents specific problems. A high number of non-specific effective infection control protocols are available in dental settings. It is of fundamental importance to implement specific protocols relating to those clinical situations that normally do not represent an emergency but which now fall into that category. The aim of this study was the comparison of data obtained from the Regional National Health Fund (NFZ) relating to the number and the type of procedures in the oral health management of children aged 0-18 years from the Wielkopolska region, with the months of March and April of 2019 being compared with those of the, respective, pandemic period of 2020. The results showed statistical differences in the number of performed procedures when comparing 2019 and 2020; especially in April (n = 53,077 in 2019 but only n = 2,287 in 2020), when lockdown restrictions reached their highest level and when only 30% of the dental clinics for children were open for patients in the Wielkopolska region of Poland. Regarding surgical cases, there were no differences in percentage frequency between April 2019 and 2020 in terms of extractions. However, an increase was observed in abscess incisions (3.5-17.8%) and surgical dressings (1.5-10.07%). There was a decrease in the total number of performed conservative dentistry procedures in April 2020, but temporary fillings in primary and permanent teeth showed a prominent increase: from 6.4% in 2019 to 19.3% in 2020; and 5.8-11.4%, respectively. Pulp treatment and mucosal lesions therapy fall into the dental emergency category during this COVID-19 pandemic. These cases have shown an increase from 3.2% in 2019 to 12.8% in 2020 for pulp treatment, and from 2.3 to 4.3% for the treatment of oral mucosal lesions. As suspected, after the lockdown was implemented, the number of pediatric dental cases were low. Moreover, the analysis revealed differences in the profile of clinical situations that represented the emergency cases and the pandemic treatment protocols. Future implications suggest that dental prophylactic procedures be included in pandemic protocols with even dental services being limited to a form of urgent treatment. New approaches and treatment models should be implemented in the control of the infectious spread of the disease in the management of the oral health of children in this pandemic period.


Subject(s)
COVID-19 , Pandemics , Child , Humans , Infection Control , Oral Health , Pandemics/prevention & control , Poland/epidemiology , SARS-CoV-2
19.
Medicine (Baltimore) ; 100(32): e26713, 2021 Aug 13.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1358516

ABSTRACT

OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) on toothache patients through posts on Sina Weibo. METHODS: Using Gooseeker, we searched and screened 24,108 posts about toothache on Weibo during the dental clinical closure period of China (February 1, 2020-February 29, 2020), and then divided them into 4 categories (causes of toothache, treatments of toothache, impacts of COVID-19 on toothache treatment, popular science articles of toothache), including 10 subcategories, to analyze the proportion of posts in each category. RESULTS: There were 12,603 postings closely related to toothache. Among them, 87.6% of posts did not indicate a specific cause of pain, and 92.8% of posts did not clearly indicate a specific method of treatment. There were 38.9% of the posts that clearly showed that their dental treatment of toothache was affected by COVID-19, including 10.5% of the posts in which patients were afraid to see the dentists because of COVID-19, and 28.4% of the posts in which patients were unable to see the dentists because the dental clinic was closed. Only 3.5% of all posts were about popular science of toothache. CONCLUSIONS: We have studied and analyzed social media data about toothache during the COVID-19 epidemic, so as to provide some insights for government organizations, the media and dentists to better guide the public to pay attention to oral health through social media. Research on social media data can help formulate public health policies.


Subject(s)
COVID-19/complications , Social Media/statistics & numerical data , Toothache/complications , COVID-19/epidemiology , COVID-19/psychology , China/epidemiology , Data Mining/methods , Data Mining/statistics & numerical data , Humans , Oral Health/standards , Oral Health/trends , Toothache/epidemiology , Toothache/psychology
20.
Biomed Res Int ; 2021: 5369133, 2021.
Article in English | MEDLINE | ID: covidwho-1348197

ABSTRACT

Objective: This study is aimed at describing a score to assess infection control structures in Oral Health Teams (OHT) in Primary Health Care (PHC) in Brazil. Methods: Secondary data from a national external evaluation of PHC conducted in 2017 and 2018 were analyzed. The construction of the score used 14 variables, divided into the following: structural characteristics of the PHC, infection control equipment under conditions of use, and biosafety supplies in sufficient quantity. The questions were mostly dichotomous (yes/no). Descriptive analyses were carried out to characterize the OHT and factor analyses to reduce the number of observed variables to a specific number of factors. Results: Among 20,301 health units with OHT, 4,510 (22.2%) units did not have washable floors, ceilings, and walls; 8,406 (41.4%) did not have a sealer; 16,780 (82.7%) did not have taps with noncontact activation, and 4,663 (23.0%) units did not have rubber gloves. Regarding personal protective equipment (PPE), 1,618 (8.0%) units did not have a sufficient quantity of basic PPE. Three factors were defined to explain the 14 evaluated variables. The South region had the best score of infection control, while the North had the worst. Conclusions: Regional inequalities in the failures in infection control structures identified in PHC with OHT were related to the physical structure, equipment, and supplies used for infection control and the absence of PPE for OHT.


Subject(s)
Dental Care/instrumentation , Infection Control/instrumentation , Personal Protective Equipment/supply & distribution , Brazil , Delivery of Health Care , Dental Health Services , Humans , Oral Health , Primary Health Care
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